2017 - 2018 Administrative Policy Manual Published February 1, 2018 
    
    Apr 20, 2019  
2017 - 2018 Administrative Policy Manual Published February 1, 2018 [ARCHIVED COPY]

Section 3 - Academic Affairs



3.1 General Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.1.

Georgia Gwinnett College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award baccalaureate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Georgia Gwinnett College.

The Commission should further be contacted to file a third-party comment at the time of the institution’s decennial review or regarding alleged non-compliance with a requirement or standard. Normal inquiries about the institution, such as admissions requirements, financial aid, educational programs, etc., should be addressed directly to the institution and not to the Commission’s office.

3.1.1 Substantive Change Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College welcomes the expansion of academic opportunities through the development of programs and/or courses offered to students. This process is specifically outlined in the Administrative Policy Manual Section 3.0 Academic Affairs, sub section 3.6 Creation and Elimination of Academic Programs and detailed further in the Faculty Manual Appendix 5 Curriculum Committee. GGC must report such intended changes to its major accrediting body, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC), and where required, obtain approval prior to the implementation of the programs and/or courses through the Substantive Change process. GGC is responsible to comply with the SACSCOC Substantive Change policy as a condition of its continued accreditation by SACSCOC. GGC has an Accreditation Liaison whose charge is to facilitate compliance with accreditation requirements.

Contained within SACSCOC Principles of Accreditation, Comprehensive Standard 3.12 specifically outlines the institution’s responsibility for compliance with the Commission’s substantive change procedures and policy. It is further delineated in 3.12.1 that the Commission be notified of changes in accordance with their policy. Additionally, SACSCOC provides within its institutional resources, a Policy Statement regarding Substantive Change for Accredited Institutions of the Commission on Colleges which outlines the process that must be followed.

Definition

Substantive change, as defined by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, “is a significant modification or expansion of the nature and scope of an accredited institution. Under federal regulations, substantive change includes:

  • Any change in the established mission or objectives of the institution
  • Any change in legal status, form of control, or ownership of the institution
  • The addition of courses or programs that represent a significant departure, either in content or method of delivery, from those that were offered when the institution was last evaluated
  • The addition of courses or programs of study at a degree or credential level different from that which is included in the institution’s current accreditation or reaffirmation.
  • A change from clock hours to credit hours
  • A substantial increase in the number of clock or credit hours awarded for successful completion of a program
  • The establishment of an additional location geographically apart from the main campus at which the institution offers at least 50 percent of an educational program
  • The establishment of a branch campus
  • Closing a program, off-campus site, branch campus or institution
  • Entering into a collaborative academic arrangement that includes only the initiation of a dual or joint academic program with another institution
  • Acquiring another institution or a program or location of another institution|
  • Adding a permanent location at a site where the institution is conducting a teach-out program for a closed institution
  • Entering into a contract by which an entity not eligible for Title IV funding offers 25% or more of one or more of the accredited institution’s programs”

Responsibility

Georgia Gwinnett College’s leadership has the fundamental responsibility to be generally aware of the substantive change policy, inform the College’s Director of the Office of Research, Sponsored Programs and Accreditation serving as the institution’s SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison, at the earliest point possible of proposals/changes that may be considered a substantive change for the College, and provide the liaison with any data, information, or prospectus necessary to comply with SACSCOC policy when requested.

The SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison will provide the leadership with information about the SACSCOC substantive change policy. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • maintaining current information concerning substantive change and sending information about substantive change to institutional leadership at least annually,
  • working with institutional leadership to determine whether a proposed change is substantive,
  • determining what action with respect to SACSCOC is needed when a change is substantive,
  • filing the appropriate notice or prospectus with SACSCOC, and
  • coordinating with SACSCOC and institutional leadership regarding any required follow-up action.

Notification of Proposed Changes

If a change is substantive, SACSCOC must be notified as much as 12 months in advance of implementing the change. Upon becoming aware of a proposed change that may be substantive, leadership of the unit proposing the change should notify the SACSCOC Liaison. The Senior Vice President for Academic & Student Affairs/Provost will provide the SACSCOC Liaison with a copy of the proposed change. The SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison in consultation with SACSCOC staff will then determine if the change could be considered a substantive change and the appropriate action will then be initiated.

Late Notification

If it is discovered that the change may be considered a substantive change and has been implemented without notification to SACSCOC, the appropriate institutional leadership has the responsibility to notify the SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison immediately. It is then the responsibility of the SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison to notify the SACSCOC President as provided in the SACSCOC Policy. To ensure that proposals/changes that may be considered substantive changes do not go unreported, the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost annually reviews changes that have been implemented to ensure that the appropriate notification to SACSCOC has been given if required.

3.1.2 Representation of Accreditation and Certification Status

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College has an institutional responsibility to adhere to SACSCOC policy regarding Accrediting Decisions of Other Agencies. SACSCOC “requires candidate and member institutions holding accredited or candidacy (pre-accredited) status from more than one U.S. Department of Education recognized institutional accrediting agency to keep each agency apprised of any change in its status with one or another agency. Any institution seeking or holding accreditation from more than one USDOE recognized institutional accrediting agency must describe itself in identical terms to each agency with regard to purpose, governance, programs, degrees, diplomas, certificates, personnel, finances, and constituents, and must keep each USDOE recognized accrediting body, including SACSCOC, apprised of any change in its status with one or another accrediting agency.”

Responsibility

Georgia Gwinnett College’s leadership has the fundamental responsibility to inform the College’s SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison at the earliest point possible of actions of other USDOE recognized accrediting bodies relative to accreditation or certification of its programs.

In order to comply with SACSCOC policy on the representation of accreditation and certification status the SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison will:

  • provide guidance with respect as to how Georgia Gwinnett College describes itself in identical terms to each USDOE recognized accrediting body with regard to purpose, governance, programs, degrees, diplomas, certificates, personnel, finances, and constituents,
  • be notified by appropriate institutional leadership regarding any accrediting actions pending or taken by any USDOE recognized accrediting body immediately,
  • provide as required by SACSCOC, evidence showing consistency in its representation of purpose, governance, programs, degrees, diplomas, certificates, personnel, finances, and constituents, and
  • file the appropriate notice with SACSCOC of any change in the institution’s status with one or another of its accrediting bodies.
 

3.2 Faculties

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.

3.2.1 Faculty Membership

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.1.

3.2.1.1 Corps of Instruction

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.1.1.

3.2.1.2 Administrative Officers

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.1.2.

3.2.1.3 Other Faculty Members

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College has filed with the Office of the Board of Regents a list of administrative offices which have ex officio faculty status.

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.1.3.

3.2.2 Election of Faculties

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.2.

3.2.3 Faculty Meetings

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.3 and see Faculty Manual of Policies and Procedures.

3.2.4 Faculty Rules and Regulations

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.4.

3.2.5 Termination of Faculty Employment

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Sections 3.2.5 and 8.3.9.

3.2.6 Regents Teaching and Service To Students Awards Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.6.

The Regents’ Teaching Excellence Award and the Regents’ Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Award recognize the finest among the University System of Georgia’s full-time instructional faculty for their demonstrated educational excellence in teaching and in the scholarship of teaching and learning. Nominees shall have a documented record of superlative teaching as well as a strong commitment to impacting student learning and the academic success of students. One (1) faculty member and one (1) department from each University System of Georgia institution may be nominated for each of the above awards; the nomination guidelines and submission procedures for each award are announced annually.

In addition, Georgia Gwinnett College has developed an Annual Awards Policy and Procedures as follows below.

3.2.6.1 Annual Awards Policies and Procedures

Reviewed May 26, 2016

In this section:

Introduction

Policies and Procedures for Faculty Awards

Eligibility

Procedure for Submitting Faculty Nominations and Portfolios

Criteria for Faculty Awards

General Guidelines

Teaching Award

Scholarship and Creative Activities Award

Student Engagement Award

Service Award

Faculty Award Recipients

Policies and Procedures for Student Awards

Eligibility

Procedure for Submitting Student Nominations and Portfolios

Criteria for Student Awards

General Guidelines

Leadership, Creativity, and Service Awards

Scholarship Awards

Freshman Award

Policies and Procedures for Staff Awards

Eligibility

Procedure for Submitting Staff Nominations

INTRODUCTION

Georgia Gwinnett College will recognize the outstanding performance of faculty, students, and staff at the fall convocation ceremony. Faculty awards will highlight outstanding performance in the areas of teaching, student engagement, scholarship and creative activities, and service. Student awards will highlight outstanding performance in the areas of scholarship (one award per school), leadership, service, and creativity. Finally, staff will receive recognition for providing outstanding service to faculty, students, and other staff in the GGC community.

Policies and procedures have been established by the Academic Schools. Those interested in submitting nominations for awards, should review all policies and procedures outlined in this document. Questions about the policies and procedures should be directed to the Chair of the Committee or one of the Faculty or staff members of the Committee.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR FACULTY AWARDS

The Annual Awards Committee will select up to five faculty members to receive awards at the convocation ceremony. Faculty awards will consist of the following:

1 Outstanding Teaching Award

1 Outstanding Scholarship and Creative Activities Award

1 Outstanding Student Engagement Award

1 Outstanding Service Award

1 Outstanding Part-Time Faculty Teaching Award

Eligibility

Faculty must meet all eligibility requirements in order to be nominated for a GGC award.

All nominees must be classified as full-time faculty at the rank of instructor, assistant, associate, or full professor for every award except the Outstanding Part-Time Faculty Teaching Award. Nominees for the Outstanding Part-Time Faculty Teaching Award must have taught at least 1 course at GGC during the Spring, Summer, or Fall semester immediately preceding the nomination period and must be classified as an adjunct faculty member at GGC.

All full-time faculty nominees must be actively teaching (not on sabbatical) for the year they receive a nomination.

Faculty may not receive the same award in two consecutive years.

Procedure for Submitting Faculty Nominations and Portfolios

Individuals interested in submitting a nomination or portfolio should follow the steps listed below. Unless otherwise explicitly stated herein, all faculty nominations must be based upon the summer semester of the previous year through the spring semester of the current year. The nominations should be submitted on or before the first Friday in February. Nominated faculty will be notified by the end of February. The deadline for faculty to submit portfolios is on or before the third Monday in March.

The Annual Awards Committee will announce a call for nominations for faculty awards.

Only students are eligible to nominate faculty members for the teaching (both full-time and part-time) and the student engagement awards. Students who are interested in nominating a faculty member for an award must complete and submit the appropriate teaching or student engagement nomination form to the Chair of the Annual Awards Committee.

Students, faculty, and staff can nominate faculty members for the scholarship and creative activities and the service awards. Those who are interested in nominating a faculty member for an award must complete and submit the official scholarship and creative activities or service nomination form to the Chair of the Annual Awards Committee.

The Annual Awards Committee will review all nominations and identify faculty who meet the eligibility requirements for the specified award.

Faculty who meet the eligibility requirements for the specified award will be notified and provided an opportunity to submit a portfolio which highlights their outstanding performance in the specified area. Please review all guidelines listed below when preparing portfolios.

*Please note that the faculty member selected for the outstanding teaching award at GGC will also be nominated for the Board of Regents teaching award.

CRITERIA FOR FACULTY AWARDS

General Guidelines

Nominated faculty must provide a cover letter addressing why they are deserving of the teaching, scholarship and creative activities, student engagement, or service award.

In addition to the cover letter, nominated faculty must follow the guidelines listed below for the specified award.

Nominees should include all relevant supporting documentation to highlight their outstanding performance in the specified area.

Faculty who are members of the Annual Awards Committee are ineligible to nominate or receive awards during their term on the committee.

Faculty must not be under any personal/academic disciplinary action at the time of selection or award.

Teaching Award

All nominated faculty for the teaching award must prepare a portfolio following the guidelines outlined by the Board of Regents. Follow the link listed below for specific information regarding criteria. http://www.usg.edu/faculty_affairs/awards/. Each nominee must request a support letter from the Dean of their school.

Scholarship and Creative Activity Award

Nominees must demonstrate that they have provided outstanding contributions to their discipline or profession.

Student Engagement Award

Nominees must demonstrate outstanding performance in the area of student engagement.

Service Award

Nominees must demonstrate outstanding performance in the service area. Specifically, nominees can provide supporting documentation illustrating their service contributions to the institution, discipline, profession, or community.

Part-Time Faculty Teaching Award

All part-time faculty nominated for the part-time teaching award must prepare a portfolio outlining his or her teaching accomplishments. The website listed above for the full-time teaching award may give nominees ideas for items to include, but part-time faculty may structure their portfolio as appropriate to suit their part-time status.

FACULTY AWARD RECIPIENTS

All faculty members selected for an award will receive a plaque and a monetary award for their outstanding performance at GGC. As an award recipient, you may be asked to speak at GGC’s Convocation ceremony.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR STUDENT AWARDS

The Annual Awards Committee will select up to eleven students to receive an award at the convocation ceremony. Award recipients will receive a plaque and a monetary award for their outstanding performance at GGC. Student awards may consist of the following:

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - School of Liberal Arts

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - School of Business

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - School of Science and Technology

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - School of Education

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - School of Nursing/Allied Health

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - Student Success

1 Outstanding Freshman Award

1 Outstanding Leadership Award

1 Outstanding Service Award

1 Outstanding Creativity Award

1 Outstanding Student Employee Award

Eligibility

Students must meet all eligibility requirements in order to be nominated for a GGC award.

For the scholarship (other than Student Success) and freshman awards students must have an overall cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above at the institution. For the leadership, service, and creativity awards as well as the student employee award, students must have an overall cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above.

For the scholarship (other than Student Success) awards students must have completed 75 credit hours.

Students must be enrolled at GGC during the period when they performed their leadership, service, and/or creative activities.

Students who are members of the Annual Awards Committee are ineligible to nominate or receive awards during their term on the committee.

Students may not receive the same award in two consecutive years, except for the scholarship awards which may be awarded in consecutive years.

Students must be in good academic and student conduct standing.

Procedure for Submitting Student Nominations and Portfolios

All individuals interested in submitting a nomination should follow the steps listed below. The nominations should be submitted on or before the first Friday in February. Students will be notified by the end of February. The deadline for submitting supporting documentation is on or before the third Monday in March.

The Annual Awards Committee will announce a call for nominations for student awards.

Faculty who are interested in nominating a student for an award must complete and submit the official student nomination form to the Chair of the Annual Awards Committee.

The Annual Awards Committee will review all nominations and identify students who meet the eligibility requirements for the specified award.

Students, faculty, and staff who are interested in nominating a student for the student employee award must complete and submit the official staff nomination form along with a support letter to the Chair of the Annual Awards Committee. The support letter should include detailed information about why the nominee is deserving of the student employee award.

Students who meet the eligibility requirements for the specified award will be notified and provided an opportunity to submit supporting documentation which highlights their outstanding performance in the specified area. NOTE: Students nominated for the student employee award are not required to submit any documentation to the Annual Awards Committee.

The Annual Awards Committee will review all supporting documentation and select one student for each award.

CRITERIA FOR STUDENT AWARDS

General Guidelines

Nominees must provide a cover letter addressing why they are deserving of the leadership, creativity, service, or freshman award.

Nominees should provide all relevant supporting documentation for the specified award.

Leadership, Creativity, and Service Awards

Nominees must demonstrate outstanding performance in the area of leadership, creativity, or service while attending GGC.

Scholarship Awards - Individual Schools

Nominees must demonstrate outstanding performance in the area of scholarship.

Nominees must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Nominees must have completed 75 credit hours.

Scholarship Award - Student Success

Nominees must have been enrolled in one or more Student Success courses during the academic year.

Nominees must have achieved outstanding performance in their Student Success course(s) and have demonstrated significant strides in personal growth.

Freshman Award

Nominees must demonstrate outstanding performance in the area of scholarship.

Nominees must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Nominees must provide one support letter from a GGC faculty member.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR STAFF AWARDS

The Annual Awards Committee will select two staff members to receive plaques and monetary awards at the convocation ceremony.

Eligibility

Staff must meet all eligibility requirements in order to be nominated for a GGC award.

Staff members who serve below the Director level or Associate or Assistant Dean levels are eligible for nomination; and those individuals who are nominated must be classified as full-time GGC staff members the year they are nominated. Employees of GGC as well as contract employees who work on the GGC campus for contractors are considered “staff” for purposes of this award.

Staff who are members of the Annual Awards Committee are ineligible to nominate or receive awards during their term on the committee.

Staff may not receive the same award in two consecutive years.

Staff must not be under any personal/academic disciplinary action at the time of selection or award.

Procedure for Submitting Staff Nominations

Individuals interested in submitting a nomination should follow the steps listed below. The nominations should be submitted on or before the first Friday in February.

The Annual Awards Committee will announce a call for nominations for staff awards.

Students, faculty, and staff who are interested in nominating a staff member for an award must complete and submit the official staff nomination form along with a support letter to the Chair of the Annual Awards Committee. The support letter should include detailed information about why the nominee is deserving of the staff award.

The Annual Awards Committee will review all nominations and identify staff members who meet the eligibility requirements for the specified award.

The Annual Awards Committee will review all completed forms and select two staff members to receive awards.

AWARDS COMMITTEE

NOMINATION FORMS  

 

3.3 Curriculum

3.3.1 Core Curriculum

Reviewed May 26, 2016

For specific requirements for Georgia Gwinnett College refer to Program Completion in the Georgia Gwinnett College Catalog. In addition to the 60 hour core curriculum all students are required to complete three credit hours of physical education that includes one credit hour of wellness (such as PHED 1101) and two additional credit hours of physical education. Veterans with 12 months or more active military service may request a waiver of the required physical education credits.

Students transferring to Georgia Gwinnett College should be aware of the following University System of Georgia policy:

  1. Students completing any core curriculum course at one USG institution or through eCore will receive full credit for that course upon transfer to another USG institution within the same major, even if a core area is not completed and even if it means giving transfer credit across areas (e.g., credit of a math course in Area C).
  2. All transfer students are required to complete ITEC 1001 (or higher IT course) unless completed at a prior institution. This is not an additional graduation requirement but will count toward completion of Area B, Area D, or the program of study.
  3. Assessment of the core curriculum by each institution is required as part of their accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and by the USG Comprehensive Program review process.

Students transferring into or out of Georgia Gwinnett College may use the table below to assure completion of all General Education requirements.

Georgia Gwinnett College General Education Requirements
Area A - Essential Skills (9 to 10 hrs) (Depending on major) ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 (English Comp I & II) and MATH 1001 (Quantitative Reasoning) or MATH 1111 (College Algebra) or MATH 1113 (Pre-Calculus) or MATH 2200 (Calculus I) or higher math (must receive a grade of “C” or better)
Area B - Institutional Option (4 hrs) Area B - Institutional Option (4 hrs)
Information Technology (4 hrs) ITEC 1001 (Introduction to Computing) or higher information technology
Area C - Humanities/Arts (6 hrs) Area C - Humanities/Arts (6 hrs)
Arts/Literature (3 hrs) MUSC 1100 (Music Appreciation) or ARTS 1100 (Art Appreciation) FILM 1005 (Intro to Film) or ENGL 2110 (World Literature) or ENGL 2100 (Trans-Atlantic English Literature)
Global Culture (3 hrs) RELN 1100 (World Religions) or GEOG 1101 (Human Geography) or one semester of intermediate level foreign language (2001 or higher in Spanish, French, or Chinese)
Area D - Science, Mathematics, and Technology (11 hrs) Area D - Science, Mathematics, and Technology (11 hrs)
Science (7 hrs) Choose one sequence: PSCI 1101K and PSCI 1102K (Physical Sciences I & II) BIOL 1101K and BIOL 1102 (Biological Sciences I & II) CHEM 1211K and CHEM 1212K (Principles of Chemistry I & II) CHEM 1151K and CHEM 1152K (Survey of Chemistry I &II)
Information Technology (4 hrs) ITEC 2110 (Digital Media) or ITEC 2120 (Introduction to Programming)
Area E - Social Sciences (12 hrs) Area E - Social Sciences (12 hrs)
History (6 hrs) Choose one US History course: HIST 2111 (U.S. History I) or HIST 2112 (U.S. History II) and one other course from the following: HIST 1111 (World History I), HIST 1112 (World History II), HIST 1121 (Western Civilization I), or HIST 1122 (Western Civilization II)
Human and Institutional Behavior (6 hrs) POLS 1101 (American Government) Choose one of the following (If proficiency in American Politics and Georgia history and constitution is demonstrated choose two of the following) PSYC 1102 (The Psychological Experience) or SOCI 1101 (Introduction to Sociology) or ANTH 1102 (Introduction to Anthropology) or ECON 2100 (Introduction to Economics)
Area F - Pre-Requisites for Major (18 hours) Requirements to be determined by the academic program. Must receive a grade of “C” or better.

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.3.1.

 

3.3.2 Student Success Courses

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See University System of Georgia Academic & Student Affairs Handbook Section 2.9 and Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.3.2.

In keeping with the admission policy of the University System of Georgia and Georgia Gwinnett College, students who lack the fundamental skills needed for success in college level courses may be admitted to the college, provided they enroll in Student Success courses specifically designed to meet their unique needs. Student Success courses are part of GGC’s Learning Support program, which is designed to prepare students for, or to assist students with, collegiate work. Institutions must serve students who fall below USG placement standards and have the flexibility to develop more rigorous academic criteria with which their students must comply. Learning Support programs are intended to serve students who need additional support in mathematics or English (reading/writing). Students who may be served within the Learning Support program are:

  • Students who do not meet USG criteria to exempt Learning Support placement.
  • Students who are determined by the institution to need academic assistance even though they are eligible to be admitted without Learning Support requirements under USG policy.
  • Students who elect to enroll in Learning Support courses in order to prepare for core curriculum courses.

3.3.2.1 Student Success Courses in English (Reading/Writing) And Math

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The School of Transitional Studies offers Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) courses designed to prepare students for college-level work.

  1. These courses include, but are not limited to, ENGL 0989: Foundations for English Composition, ENGL 0999: Support for English Composition, MATH 0987: Foundations for Quantitative Reasoning, MATH 0997: Support for Quantitative Reasoning, MATH 0989: Foundations for College Algebra, and MATH 0999: Support for College Algebra.
  2. No degree credit will be earned in Student Success courses, but institutional credit will be awarded.
  3. The following grades are approved for Student Success courses in English (reading/writing), and mathematics:
  • Passing course grades: A, B, C, S
  • Failing course grades: F, U, WF
  • Progress insufficient for completion of the course: IP
  • Academic progress satisfactory, but coursework incomplete: I
  • Withdrawal without penalty: W
  • Student auditing Student Success course that is not required but taken voluntarily: V

Georgia Gwinnett College may use any of these grades or symbols that it deems appropriate for its Student Success program. “D” is not allowed as a grade in Student Success courses.

3.3.2.1.1 Student Placement Test Scores Relative to Course Placement

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students taking courses or seeking to enter programs leading to the associate or baccalaureate degree must be evaluated for Learning Support placement in English (reading/writing) and mathematics. (See USG Academic Affairs Handbook Section 3.2.4 for test score information.) In all cases, students should be encouraged to submit test scores that can be used to exempt placement testing. New students with fewer than 30 semester hours are required to demonstrate proficiency in English (reading/writing), and mathematics to register for college-level courses. Those entering without transferable English credit (e.g., ENGL 1101) or mathematics credit (e.g., MATH 1001, MATH 1111) and scores below acceptable SAT/ACT minimums will be required to take a placement exam to determine the appropriate level of coursework. Students may take the placement exam twice.

Placement exams are administered by Testing Services. The University System of Georgia may mandate or recommend the use of specific placement exams (e.g., COMPASS, Accuplacer) and scores for placement into college-level courses. Georgia Gwinnett College may require students to take additional placement exams to refine placement of new students within the guidelines of the University System. Absent SAT, ACT, or other scores high enough to exempt placement testing, an approved placement exam (e.g., COMPASS, Accuplacer) will be used as the placement test.

When available, a Mathematics Placement Index (MPI) and an English Placement Index (EPI) will be calculated based on High School Grade Point Average (HSGPA), SAT or ACT and, when indicated, the COMPASS placement test or other approved placement test. (See USG Academic Affairs Handbook Section 3.2.4 for more information.)

For some students who score below the cutoff EPI or MPI, those students will be required to take the appropriate COMPASS or other approved placement tests. The placement test score will be combined with the HSGPA and SAT/ACT and the resultant EPI or MPI will be compared to the System level cut scores to determine students’ Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) placement.

Specific information about the placement exams and placement scores are available on the Georgia Gwinnett College website. The majority of students with Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) requirements will be placed into corequisite courses.

3.3.2.1.1.1 English Language Proficiency Requirements

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students whose secondary education was completed outside the United States system of education whose first language is not English may be admitted with acceptable foreign credentials and English language proficiency as demonstrated on a test of English language proficiency (e.g., TOEFL, IELTS). Please refer to the chart provided in USG Academic Affairs Handbook Section 3.2.6 for approved exams and minimum standards or some other USG-approved evaluations of English.*

*Institutions and departmental programs within the institution may set higher minimum test scores for admission.

Institutions such as GGC may develop procedures to determine whether there is a need for placement in Learning Support English and/or ESL courses for students who meet the minimum English Proficiency requirements. At GGC, entering students who are non-native speakers of English and who score below 480 on the verbal section of the SAT or below 21 on the English ACT are required to take the EAP placement test administered by Testing Services. The EAP placement test may be taken twice. Students with transfer credit for ENGL 1101 and no RHSC deficiency in English are not required to take the EAP placement test (See APM 3.3.2.2.1 Criteria for Determining EAP/ESL Placement).

Math admissions criteria–including the SAT or ACT–and placement criteria are required for international students.

An academically admissible applicant with credentials from another country who needs supplemental English language instruction (as indicated by an approved method for determining English Proficiency described above) may be admitted to a degree program on the condition that the student will receive the supplemental English language instruction in a System-approved program. This conditional admission is possible only at those institutions approved to provide English language instruction for non-native speakers of English. Programs of English as a Second Language (ESL) used under this provision must be approved by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer.

3.3.2.1.2 Policies for Students with Student Success Requirements

Reviewed May 26, 2016

3.3.2.1.2.1 Advising

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students enrolled in Student Success courses are provided help to develop their personal goals and appropriate curriculum plans. Students may be assigned a Student Success advisor in the Georgia Gwinnett College Advising Center to make sure they remain on track to exit their Student Success courses and succeed at Georgia Gwinnett College.

3.3.2.1.2.2 Student Success Courses Take Priority

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Each institution that admits students required by USG policy to enroll in Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) courses before or as they attempt core curriculum courses shall have program designed, at a minimum, to meet the specific needs of students who, according to USG placement standards, must enroll in Learning Support. GGC may set higher standards for placement, and the program may include other Learning Support components. It is the policy of the University System of Georgia that during each semester of enrollment, a student must first register for all required Student Success courses before being allowed to register for other courses. This policy also applies to part-time students. Two exceptions are possible:

  1. When two Student Success areas are required and the student is enrolled in at least one Student Success course, a freshman orientation course (e.g., GGC 1000) or physical education course or other activity or performance course may, if available, be taken that semester instead of another required Student Success course.
  2. In the event that a required Student Success course is not available, a student may enroll in a course for degree credit if the student has met the course requirements, subject to the written approval of the President or designee.

Students who have accumulated a maximum of 30 semester hours of college-level credit and have not successfully completed required Learning Support courses may enroll only in Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) courses until requirements are successfully completed. Students with transfer credit or credit earned in a certificate or prior degree program who are required to take Learning Support courses for their current degree objectives may earn up to 30 additional hours of college-level credit. After earning the additional hours, such students may enroll in Learning Support courses only. GGC may limit accumulation of college-level credit to 20 hours.

3.3.2.1.2.3 Prerequisites for College-Level Classes

Reviewed May 26, 2016

  1. Required Student Success classes can restrict the range of collegiate level courses students may take. Students who are required to enroll in Student Success courses are not permitted to enroll in credit courses that require the content or the skills of the prerequisite courses.
  2. The following core curriculum areas require students to complete or exempt certain Student Success requirements:
  • Completion or exemption from Foundations-level Student Success English is a prerequisite for Social, Natural, and Physical Science courses.
  • Completion or exemption from Foundations-level Student Success English or placement into corequisite English is required for placement into college-level English courses (ENGL 1101).
  • Completion or exemption from Foundations-level Student Success mathematics or placement into corequisite mathematics is required for placement into college level mathematics courses.
  • Completion or exemption from Foundations-level Student Success mathematics is a prerequisite for physics and chemistry courses.
  • GGC may set higher prerequisite standards, such as completion of Student Success requirements at the corequisite level.
  • Any courses with prerequisite of any other college-level course requires exit or exemption from related Student Success requirements. Exceptions to this policy are allowed for co-requisite programs that link Student Success courses and college-level courses.
  • Courses such as music, art, and film are open to students with Student Success requirements.
  1. Students who exceed the USG minimum requirements but are required by GGC to take Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) courses in order to prepare for core curriculum courses may, at the institution’s option, be exempted from any or all of the requirements specified in Section 3.3.2.1.2.3.b above. However, all such requirements imposed by GGC must be satisfied by the time the student has earned 30 semester credit hours or the student must enroll in course work that will satisfy the requirements every semester of enrollment until the requirements are satisfied. GGC has the authority to limit accumulation of college-level credit to 20 hours.

3.3.2.1.2.4 30-Hour Rule for Students with Student Success Requirements

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students who have accumulated a maximum of 30 semester hours of college-level credit and have not successfully completed required Student Success courses may enroll only in Student Success courses until requirements are successfully completed. Students with transfer credit or credit earned in a certificate or prior degree program who are required to take Student Success courses for their current degree objectives may earn up to 30 additional hours of college-level credit. After earning the additional hours, such students may enroll in Student Success courses only.

3.3.2.1.2.5 Withdrawal from Student Success Courses

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students with Student Success requirements who are enrolled in both Student Success courses and college-level credit courses and who withdraw from required Student Success courses are not required to withdraw from unrelated collegiate courses.

3.3.2.1.2.6 Maximum Number of Attempts And Suspension

Reviewed May 26, 2016

  1. An attempt is defined as an institutional credit course in which a student receives any grade or symbol except “W” or “WM”.
  2. If students do not complete requirements for Foundations-level English or mathematics in two attempts, they will be suspended for a calendar year. Suspended students may be considered for readmission before the end of one year if they can provide evidence that they have taken measures to improve their skills.
  3. Students who have been suspended from the institution without completing Student Success requirements may complete their Student Success requirements and additional collegiate-level work at SACSCOC-accredited TCSG institutions during the year of suspension.
  4. There are no limits on attempts in corequisite Student Success courses.

3.3.2.1.2.7 Transfer Students and Student Success Courses

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Time spent in Student Success course work in a disciplinary area is cumulative within the University System of Georgia. A transfer Student Success student with fewer than two attempts in Foundations-level English (reading/writing) and/or mathematics may be granted an additional semester in Foundations-level Student Success course(s) at Georgia Gwinnett College. Students who have been suspended from Georgia Gwinnett College may not be exempted from their required Student Success courses through transfer of course credit unless they are eligible for transfer admission under GGC’s regular transfer admission policies. Students who complete course work and exit an area of Student Success/Learning Support at any institution in the USG shall not be required to re-enter that area of Student Success upon transfer to GGC. For students transferring from SACSCOC-accredited TCSG colleges, exit will be considered according to guidelines issued by the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Officer of the USG.

3.3.2.1.2.8 Resuming College Work and Student Success Requirements

Reviewed May 26, 2016

  1. Students who leave a USG school for any reason may be re-admitted without Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) requirements if they meet one of the following conditions:
  • Students have completed all Student Success/Learning Support requirements at a SACSCOC TCSG institution and completion of Student Success/Learning Support requirements is documented on their TCSG transcript.
  • Students have earned transferable credit at a regionally-accredited non-USG institution for ENGL 1101 or 1102 (for completion of the Student Success/Learning Support English requirement) or an Area A mathematics course (for completion of the Student Success/Learning Support Mathematics requirement). Georgia Gwinnett College will decide whether to grant Area A credit for courses taken elsewhere.
  • Students have completed Student Success/Learning Support requirements at another USG institution and completion of Student Success/Learning Support requirements is documented on their transfer transcript.
  1. Students who leave Georgia Gwinnett College and return without having satisfied their Student Success requirements in the interim may be readmitted to the college under the following conditions:
  • Students who have been suspended for a calendar year for failure to complete a Foundations-level Student Success course within two attempts have two options on their return: See 3.3.2.1.6.
  • Students with Student Success requirements who voluntarily leave Georgia Gwinnett College for periods of less than one calendar year will return to the level of Student Success (Foundations-level or corequisite) they were in immediately prior to their absence:
    • Time spent in Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) course work in a disciplinary area is cumulative within the USG. Students who return to Georgia Gwinnett College less than one calendar year after one attempt in Foundations-level Student Success will return on their second attempt in the Foundations-level Student Success course.
    • Students who had completed requirements for Foundations-level Student Success and had been recommended for corequisite Student Success may reenter at the corequisite support level.
  • Students in Student Success who voluntarily leave Georgia Gwinnett College for periods of one calendar year or more must be retested with the COMPASS or other approved placement test in any previously unsatisfied Student Success area:
    • Such students may be readmitted without a Student Success requirement if they meet the institutional criteria for exemption.
    • Students who do not score high enough on the placement test to exempt Student Success requirements may be placed in either Foundations-level or corequisite courses.
    • Students placed in Foundations-level Student Success may be readmitted and allowed up to two additional attempts in Foundations-level Student Success in both English and mathematics, as applicable, if individual evaluation indicates that the student has a reasonable chance of success on readmission.
  1. Students readmitted under this provision are subject to the 30-hour limit on college-level coursework and may not take credit work if they had earned 30 or more credit hours during their previous period(s) of enrollment and have not completed Student Success requirements in the interim (See 3.3.2.1.2.4).
  2. Completion of transferable Area A courses in English or mathematics from any institution will eliminate further Student Success requirements in that area upon transfer back to Georgia Gwinnett College.

3.3.2.1.2.9 Reporting and Recording Learning Support Status on Transcripts

Reviewed May 26, 2016

All students enrolled in Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) courses will be reported in the USG Data Warehouse as having Learning Support requirements or enrolling as volunteers.

USG procedures for Learning Support programs require that records of each student’s Learning Support placement evaluation and current status be maintained in a USG-approved format. Transcripts of all students evaluated for Learning Support need to include placement and current status information for each Learning Support area as described in USG Academic Affairs Handbook Section 2.9.3.

3.3.2.1.3 Exit Policies for Student Success Courses

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students will exit Student Success (corequisite Learning Support English or Mathematics) requirements by successfully passing the corresponding Area A collegiate-level course with a grade of C or better. Because registration for the next semester occurs before final grades are calculated, students may initially register for college-level courses but then not exit the Student Success requirements that are prerequisites for the college-level courses. It is the responsibility of the student to amend his or her class schedule by removing the college-level courses for which the student has not satisfied the prerequisites and register for any required Student Success courses from which the student did not exit. There are no limits on attempts in corequisite Student Success courses.

3.3.2.1.4 Voluntarily Enrolling in Student Success Courses

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students who are required to take Learning Support courses in an area may not register as auditors in any Learning Support course in that area. Students who are not required to take Student Success courses in a disciplinary area may elect to enroll in Student Success courses in the non-required area for institutional credit or on an audit basis. Such students are limited to a maximum of two attempts if they elect to enroll in Foundations-level English (reading/writing) or mathematics but are not subject to the requirements specified in 3.3.2.1.5. There is no limit on attempts for students who elect to enroll in corequisite Student Success courses. An attempt is defined as an institutional credit course in which a student receives any grade or symbol except “W.” See USG Academic Affairs Handbook Section 2.9.1, Part IV, K-L: “Voluntary Enrollment in Learning Support Courses.”

3.3.2.1.5 Student Success Suspension in English And Mathematics

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students placed into Student Success courses must complete requirements for Foundations courses for English (reading/writing) or mathematics in two semesters (an attempt being defined as an institutional credit course in which a student receives any grade or symbol except “W” or “WM”) or the student will be suspended for one calendar year. During this time, students are expected to take measures to improve their skills before being readmitted to Georgia Gwinnett College. Suspended students may be considered for readmission before the end of one year if they can provide evidence that they have taken measures to improve their skills. Students who have been suspended from the institution without completing Student Success requirements may complete their Student Success/Learning Support requirements and additional collegiate-level work at SACSCOC accredited TCSG institutions during the year of suspension. There are no limits on attempts in corequisite Student Success courses.

3.3.2.1.6 Readmission from Student Success Suspension

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students who have been suspended for a calendar year for failure to complete a Foundations-level Student Success course within two attempts may apply for readmission. Readmitted students have two options on their return:

  • Students may return to placement in the Foundations-level Student Success course and have two more attempts.
  • Students may take the COMPASS test or other approved placement test and accept the resulting Student Success placement. If placed in Foundations-level Student Success, they will have two more attempts to complete this level.

Students suspended from the institution without completing Student Success requirements may not be exempted from the Student Success course requirements through transfer of course credit unless they are eligible for transfer admission under GGC’s regular transfer admission policies.

3.3.2.1.7 Students with Special Needs Required to Enroll in Student Success Classes

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students with documented learning disorders as defined in the Academic & Student Affairs Handbook, Section 3.11.1, who are required to enroll in Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) courses must fulfill all stated requirements, including placement testing (COMPASS or system-approved alternate) and course requirements. General and specific guidelines for documentation of learning disorders appear in Section 3, Appendices D and E of the USG Academic Affairs Handbook. Students will be provided with appropriate testing and/or course accommodations as described in the USG Academic Affairs Handbook Section 3.11.5, “Learning Support Considerations.”

Appropriate course and testing accommodations should be made for students with sensory, mobility, or systemic disorders. See USG Academic Affairs Handbook Section 2.9.1, Part IV, T-U: “Students with Special Needs” for additional information.

3.3.2.2 Student Success Courses in English For Academic Purposes/English as a Second Language

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students whose native language is not English must show proficiency in English before being admitted to the college. Students who graduated from a high school outside the United States must present a satisfactory score on an approved English language proficiency exam (e.g., TOEFL, IELTS). Students with scores that admit them to Georgia Gwinnett College will be placed in either English for Academic Purposes/English as a Second Language (EAP/ESL) or collegiate-level English courses depending on their placement test results (See 3.3.2.2.1).

3.3.2.2.1 Criteria for Determining EAP/ESL Placement

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Entering students who are non-native speakers of English and who score below minimum scores for collegiate-level English placement on the verbal section of the SAT or the English ACT are required to take the EAP placement test administered by Testing Services. The EAP placement test may be taken twice. Students with transfer credit for ENGL 1101 and no RHSC deficiency in English are not required to take the EAP placement test.

3.3.2.2.2 English For Academic Purposes/English as a Second Language (EAP/ESL) Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The English for Academic Purposes/English as a Second Language (EAP/ESL) program provides instruction in academic English, including reading, writing, and communication skills, for non-native speakers of English. The EAP program is designed to prepare students in the language skills necessary for successful academic work at Georgia Gwinnett College.

3.3.2.2.3 EAP/ESL Prerequisites for College-Level Classes

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Students who are enrolled in EAP courses may have restrictions on collegiate-level courses they may take while enrolled in EAP courses. Students should consult the Georgia Gwinnett College Catalog to determine course prerequisites.

3.3.2.2.4 EAP/ESL Registration Takes Priority

Reviewed May 26, 2016

During each semester of enrollment, EAP/ESL students must first register for all required EAP courses before registering for other courses. This policy applies to full-time and part-time students, and any exceptions must be approved through the office of the dean.

3.3.2.2.5 EAP/ESL Withdrawal Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

EAP/ESL students may withdraw from one or more EAP courses. They will not be withdrawn from unrelated collegiate courses as long as they remain enrolled in a minimum of one EAP course. Students who withdraw from all EAP courses will also be withdrawn from all unrelated collegiate courses.

3.3.2.2.6 EAP/ESL Exit Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

In order to exit the EAP program, students must either exempt or achieve passing grades in the upper level EAP course(s), including any required final exit exams. Final exams in EAP courses may be given after registration for the following semester, and students may have registered for courses for which their current EAP courses are prerequisites. Because of this, if students enrolled in EAP courses do not pass their final exams in those courses, they may not exit and thus be unable to take some collegiate-level courses the next semester. It is the responsibility of students in Student Success classes like EAP to amend their schedule to reflect their exit results.

 

3.3.3 Instruction Offered Externally

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College does not offer instruction externally.

 

3.3.4 United States and Georgia History And Constitutions

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.3.4.

All colleges and universities sustained or in any manner supported by public funds shall give instruction in the history of the United States, in the history of Georgia, and in the essentials of the United States Constitution and the Constitution of Georgia, and no undergraduate student in any college or university shall receive a certificate of graduation or a degree without successfully completing course work or previously passing a satisfactory examination on the history of the United States and the history of Georgia, and upon the provisions and principles of the United States Constitution and the Constitution of Georgia.

United States and Georgia History Exams

Eligibility to Take History Tests

The tests are designed to allow students to meet the legislative requirement of demonstrating knowledge of US and Georgia history, only if they failed to fulfill it in the normal course of completing their general education requirements.

Students will be required to take the US History test or to take an additional specific history course if they completed the Area E history requirement without taking a US history course

Students will be required either to take the Georgia History test or to take an additional specific history course if they fall into one of the following categories:

  1. Students who received US History AP credit which exempted their taking the General Education Area E required history courses.
  2. Students who completed a US History course in fulfilling the Area E history requirement at a non-USG system school.

Students may take either test only twice in their academic career, and not more than once per semester. If they fail a test twice, they MUST take an additional course that meets the legislative requirement.

Overview of US History Test

This computer-based test contains multiple choice questions that replicate a rigorous final exam in a course that meets the US History legislative requirements. Thus the test format includes 33 US history multiple choice questions worth 3 points and one question worth 1 point for a total of 100 points. The thirty-four questions are generated from a test bank of over 900 questions.

Overview of Georgia History Test

This computer-based test consists of 40 multiple choice questions that focus on the political and social history of the state from prehistory to contemporary experience.

Alternatives to Taking Test

Students may take history courses at Georgia Gwinnett College that meet the legislative requirement. These courses currently include the US History surveys (HIST 2111 and HIST 2112) and HIST 3265 (Georgia History).

 

3.3.5 University System and Technical College System Of Articulation Agreement

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.3.5.

3.3.5.1 Associate Degrees, Diplomas & Certificates

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.3.5.1.

3.3.5.2 General Education Course Transfer

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.3.5.2.

 

3.4 Calendar of Academic Activities

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.4.

3.4.1 Semester System

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.4.1.

3.4.1.1 Georgia Gwinnett College Credit Granting Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The credit hour at Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) is the unit by which course work is measured. All courses originate at the school level and are reviewed based on the standards set forth by the College Curriculum Committee’s Policy and Procedures.

GGC adheres to the view by the Department of Education indicating that learning outcomes are the final and most important result of varied educational platforms, and that individual institutions set standards for granting academic credit. Specific learning outcomes are assessed by each school.

A variety of teaching platforms (traditional day, evening, weekends) are available to the traditional and nontraditional students at GGC. Below are the typical formats used by GGC with the indicators of engaged learning time per credit to which the institution adheres. In addition, selected courses are offered in split sessions in the fall and spring semesters or mini sessions in the summer. The contact time for these different formats is equal to the full semester as per the chart below. Georgia Gwinnett College participates in eCore through the University of Georgia initiative (INGRESS). Contact hours for eCore courses are defined by the University System of Georgia.

Academic Activity Formula

(1)= 50 minutes

1= hour of credit
Meeting Plan Minimum Instructional Minutes Per Day Minimum Engaged Learning Time Per Credit Per semester
Classroom (1)-1 15 Weeks: 3 meetings per week 50 minutes per day 750 minutes
Classroom (1)-1 15 Weeks: 2 meetings per week 75 minutes per day 750 minutes
Classroom (1)-1 15 Weeks: 1 meeting per week 150 minutes per day 750 minutes
Laboratory (2)-1 15 Weeks: 1 meeting per week 100 minutes per day 1500 minutes per credit hour in classroom
Internship (3)-1 15 Weeks Varies per internship; however minimum of 450 minutes of time on task per week 2250 minutes per credit hour
Externship (3)-1 15 Weeks Varies per externship; minimum of 450 minutes of time on task per week 2250 minutes per credit hour
Student Teaching ( 8 CR)   15 Weeks Minimum of 2400 minutes of field time on task each week 5015 minutes per credit hour

3.4.2 Uniform Academic Calendar

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.4.2.

3.4.3 Religious Holiday Schedule

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual section 3.4.3.

In accordance with the University System of Georgia policies and procedures, Georgia Gwinnett College provides students the option of observing religious holidays unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the college. Students who miss class to observe a religious holiday during scheduled class times must make arrangements in advance with the faculty member. Faculty should be sensitive to the student issues regarding religious holidays and are encouraged to provide an alternative option for making up class work.

This policy is aligned with that of the USG Academic Affairs Handbook, Section 2.1, “Semester System, Uniform Academic Calendar, Cancellation of Classes, and Religious Holidays.” An excerpt dealing with the observance of religious holidays by students is provided below:

Religious Holiday Schedule

Decisions as to which religious holidays are covered by institutional policy are left to the discretion of individual USG institutions since the characteristics of the student body and faculty may vary considerably among institutions.

3.4.4 Exceptions

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.4.4.

 

3.5 Grading System

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.

3.5.1 Grade Point Average

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.1.

3.5.1.1 Grades Approved in Determining The Grade Point Average

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.1.1.

Georgia Gwinnett College shall use the Board of Regent’s Uniform Grading System with the additional grades of WA and FN.

The following grades are approved by the Board of Regents for use in institutions in the determination of the Grade Point Average. Georgia Gwinnett College has added the grade of WA and FN.

Grade Grade Point Average
A Excellent (4.00)
B Good (3.00)
C Satisfactory (2.00)
D Passing (1.00)
F Failure (0.00)
WF Withdrew failing (0.00)
WA Administrative Withdrawal (0.00)
FN Failure due to Non Attendance (0.00)

The minimum passing grade for most courses is the “D” grade. ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1111 (or equivalent courses) and all Student Success courses must be passed with a minimum grade of “C.” Courses in Area F of the Common Core as well as all courses in the student’s major must be passed with a minimum grade of “C.” In addition, courses that are pre-requisites to other courses require a “C” or better to meet the pre-requisite requirement.

3.5.1.2 Cumulative Grade Point Average

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.1.2.

The cumulative grade point average at GGC will be calculated by dividing the number of hours scheduled in all courses attempted in which a grade of A, B, C, D, F, WF, FN, or WA has been received into the number of grade points earned on those hours scheduled. The cumulative grade point average will be recorded on the student’s permanent record. Institutional credit shall in no way affect the cumulative grade point average.

3.5.2 Symbols Not Included in Determining the Grade Point Average

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.2.

The following grade symbols will be used in the cases indicated but will not be included in computing the student’s grade point average:

I = indicates an incomplete grade for the course due to non-academic reasons which prohibited the student from completing the requirements for a course. The assignment of the “I” grade is at the discretion of the course instructor and Dean but should only be assigned if the student has completed satisfactory work up to the last two weeks of the semester then faced extreme personal hardships in completing the semester. Prior to the last two weeks of the semester, the grade assigned should be “W” or “WF.”

Assignment of an “I” grade indicates that the instructor and the student have worked out a plan for completing the remaining course requirements unless otherwise stated in the incomplete contract. The deadline for removing an “I” grade is the last day of the following semester. If the “I” grade is not removed within the defined time period, the “I” converts to a grade of “F” and is then factored into the student’s grade- point average. Requests for the approval of extensions must be made to the office of the dean.

IP = indicates a student has made progress in a Student Success course, but not sufficient progress to meet the requirements for the next course in the Learning Support sequence. The “IP” grade is not included in the calculation of the student’s grade-point average.

K = indicates credit given by external examination (CLEP, AP, etc.). The “K” grade is not included in the calculation of the student’s grade-point average.

S = indicates successful completion of the Regents’ Writing Skills course and/or the Regents’ Reading Skills course and successful completion of the corresponding Regents’ Test. The “S” grade is not included in the calculation of the student’s grade-point average.

U = indicates unsuccessful completion of the Regents’ Writing Skills course and/or the Regents’ Reading Skills course and unsuccessful completion of the corresponding Regents’ Test. The “U” grade is not included in the calculation of the student’s grade-point average.

V = indicates that a student was given permission to audit this course. Students may not transfer from audit to credit status or vice versa. Students may register, however, on a credit basis for a course that has previously been audited.

W = indicates that a student was permitted to withdraw without penalty. Withdrawals without penalty will not be permitted after mid-semester except in cases of hardship as determined by the Registrar.

WM= indicates a student was permitted to withdraw under the Board of Regents policy for military service refunds. The use of this symbol indicates that this student was permitted to withdraw without penalty at any time during the term.

3.5.3 Grade Point Average Upon Academic Renewal

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.3.

Academic Renewal (AR) allows Georgia Gwinnett College degree-seeking students who earlier experienced academic difficulty the opportunity to make a fresh start and have one final opportunity to earn an associate or bachelor’s degree.

Application for Academic Renewal (AR):

  • Students must be admitted to GGC and have had a previous absence of three (3) years from GGC or a regionally accredited institution of higher education to apply for AR.
  • Students with transfer credit taken during the period of absence will receive transfer credit for all coursework eligible to be awarded; however only credit taken over three years ago is eligible for AR.
  • Students are encouraged to apply for AR as soon as possible after admission to GGC. Students may not apply for AR if they were admitted one full year or longer prior to their application for AR.
  • Students must have a GGC transfer grade point average (GPA) of less than 2.0 at the time of admission in order to be considered for AR.
  • Students who are approved for AR will be eligible to graduate with honors based on GGC’s policy regarding academic honors at graduation.
  • All previously attempted coursework continues to be recorded on the student’s official transcript.
  • GGC’s registrar will review the application and determine eligibility.
  • Students who are denied AR can appeal. Appeals will go to the AR appeal committee for a decision.

Procedures for Academic Renewal (AR):

  1. The Academic Renewal GPA will be used for determining academic standing and eligibility for graduation.
  2. To earn a degree, a student must meet the institution’s residency requirements after acquiring academic renewal status.
  3. At least 50% of work toward a degree must be completed after the granting of Academic Renewal status for a student to be eligible for honors at graduation.
  4. Academic credit for previously completed coursework – including transfer coursework taken more than three (3) years ago – will be retained only for courses in which an A, B or C grade has been earned.
  5. Retained grades are not calculated in a Renewal GPA. Such credit is considered in the same context as transfer credit, credit by examination and courses with grades of “S.”
  6. Courses with D or F grades must be repeated at the Academic Renewal institution if they are required in the student’s degree program. Further, all remaining courses for the current degree objective must be completed at the Academic Renewal institution, i.e., no transient credit will be accepted.
  7. Applicability of retained credit to degree requirements will be determined by the degree requirements currently in effect at the time Academic Renewal status is conferred on the student. Specific institutional program regulations must also be met.
  8. If a student does not request Academic Renewal status at the time of re-enrollment after a three (3) year or greater period of absence, the student may do so within one full calendar year.
  9. The Renewal GPA begins with the semester following re-enrollment.
  10. Reentry into any program is not automatic.
  11. If a student is denied Academic Renewal and subsequently does not re-enroll, he/she may resubmit an Academic Renewal application after no fewer than three semesters have passed since the initial petition.
  12. The granting of Academic Renewal does not supersede financial aid policies regarding Satisfactory Academic Progress.
  13. The granting of Academic Renewal does not supersede the admissions requirements of certain programs (e.g., teacher education, nursing) which require a specific minimum grade point average based upon all coursework.
  14. The Academic Renewal GPA will include all coursework taken since re-enrollment.
 

3.6 Creation and Elimination of Academic Programs

Reviewed May 26, 2016

3.6.1 Creation of Academic Programs

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.6.1. Also refer to Faculty Manual of Policies and Procedures Curriculum Committee Policies and Procedures Manual Appendix 5.

3.6.2 Termination of Academic Programs

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.6.2.

3.6.3 Comprehensive Academic Program Review

Reviewed March 3, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual section 3.6.3.

Section I: Comprehensive Program Review

An Overview of the BOR Policies for Comprehensive Program Review (CPR)

University System of Georgia policy requires that institutions have a “robust method of reviewing existing programs” and notes that the role of the System office is “to periodically examine these reviews in order to assure the Board of Regents that institutions are carrying out this responsibility in a way that ensures high academic standards are being met.” The following list summarizes the major expectations established by the CPR Task Force.

  • Institutions must develop a process approved by System Office that reviews all degrees offered by the institution.
  • The process will have an emphasis on program improvement. CPR must emphasize a “culture of evidence,” that is, indicators or outcomes collected, tracked and analyzed to help determine how to improve the quality of a program. The goal is for programs to seek improvement, not just decide if the program is high quality or not.
  • The CPR process will establish and evaluate program-level goals for diversity of students, faculty and staff. The review report should include an analysis of why goals are or are not met.
  • Institutional review of general education is required. In addition, institutions may elect and are encouraged to review groups of courses considered a program (e.g. English as a Second Language, 1st Year Experience, Senior Experience, etc.). These reviews should assure that desired student learning outcomes are being met.
  • Institutions will post program review results on a password protected institutional web site and the
  • System Academic Affairs System Office staff will have access to these sites.
  • Triggered program reports are informational reports to the institution’s leadership for review and follow-up as appropriate. They no longer require an institutional response to the System office.
  • Each new program will be reviewed within seven years (not to exceed ten) to allow institutions to include new programs into regular comprehensive review cycle (a successful new program is defined as on track, making adequate progress toward becoming firmly established; unsuccessful as not on track and making inadequate progress). If deemed unsuccessful, the institution should submit a plan and timeline for corrective actions.
  • Program accreditation reports cannot be substituted for CPR. However, institutions are expected to use information from the accreditation process for CPR purposes.
  • Academic Affairs System Office staff will perform institutional spot audits on institutional reviews posted to respective institutional web sites to ensure institutional decision making follows programmatic recommendations for improvement. The System Office emphasis is on quality assurance, facilitation and support.
  • Online programs should be reviewed by the same guidelines as on-ground programs.

GGC: Procedures for CPR

CPR at GGC is built onto the framework for Annual Program Review (APR). Each year, every academic program at GGC, including General Education and the Student Success Programs, prepares and presents an extensive review of its status from four perspectives:

  1. In relation to its own student learning outcomes,
  2. In relation to identified best practices and disciplinary trends,
  3. In relation to the strategic plan and vision of GGC, and
  4. In relation to its available resources and resource needs.

This annual report compiles data on student demographics, student learning, program productivity, faculty activity. Using these data, the program faculty and the Dean or Director of the area in which the program is housed review the program status, develop specific action plans in response to the resulting findings, and determine the resource implications of the actions plans. Both a written report and an oral presentation are provided to the Senior Vice President of Academic & Student Affairs/Provost. Full details on the expectations and procedures for APR are provided in Section II of this document.

On a cyclical basis, each program conducts a Comprehensive Program Review in conjunction with its APR. To conduct the CPR, the program adds the following elements to the APR.

  1. A longitudinal analysis of each major component of the annual report addressing specifically indicators of improvement over time and/or indicators of developing or unsolved problems.
  2. A focused analysis of the changes in student learning and/or program productivity following implementation of specific action plans. This analysis identifies the indicators that an action plan was intended to impact and assesses that impact to the extent possible. If the action plan did not produce the expected or intended improvements, the analysis addresses possible expectations and details the revisions to the action plan that will be made in response.
  3. A projection of the program’s anticipated status over the next several years based on the longitudinal analyses of the annual data.
  4. A comparison of the program’s overall demographic profile of students, faculty, and staff to the institutionally established diversity goals. If this comparison indicates that the goals are not being achieved, the CPR includes an analysis of potential explanatory factors including recruitment efforts and profiles of applicants, retained and non-retained students, faculty, and staff, and other data as appropriate.
  5. A report by an external review group may be included when appropriate or when requested by the Provost.

Section 2: Annual Academic Program Review

All GGC academic programs, including the Student Success programs (e.g., EAP, Reading, Learning Support) and the General Education program will conduct an annual academic program review and a periodic comprehensive program review. The purpose of the annual academic program review is primarily to provide a structure and opportunity for the faculty and leadership of each major program to consider the status of the program from four perspectives:

  1. In relation to its own student learning outcomes,
  2. In relation to identified best practices and disciplinary trends,
  3. In relation to the strategic plan and vision of GGC, and
  4. In relation to its available resources and resource needs.

The end product of this review is a clearly articulated set of short and long term responses.

The Process and Content of Academic Program Review

Academic Program Review at Georgia Gwinnett College will consist of two parts:

  1. A written report, the details of which are described in the following section below
  2. An oral presentation which will consist of 5 parts:
  1. Discussion of the best practices in the discipline that have been identified
  2. Discussion of the student learning outcome results for the year, including appropriate action plans in response
  3. Discussion of the results of the assessment of the strategic plan of the unit, including appropriate action plans in response
  4. Discussion of the resource implications of the action plans
  5. One other criterion from the written report which addresses either (a) a topic the discipline/unit considers important to the current state of the program or (b) a specific focus identified by the Provost.

Content of the Written Program Review

The key components, and specific instructions for each, are as follows:

  1. Vision for the Program

This portion of the review includes the current vision and mission for the program and notes any changes that have been made to the mission and vision. This section also includes

  1. descriptions of two or more best practices in your discipline that show potential for use at GGC along with a summary of theoretical and/or applied data supporting the selection of the specified practices and
  2. descriptions of current and upcoming trends in the discipline.

The best practices section of the review specifies the rationale for selecting each best practice, with a focus on both the theoretical foundations for the specific practice and examples of its implementation. Examples of implementation should include data on the characteristics of the program implementing the practice and data on the student learning outcomes of the program. Where possible, results of comparative studies demonstrating that the identified practice contributes to improved student learning outcomes should be included.

The disciplinary trends section of the review addresses the global and national character of the discipline and identifies growth areas, major shifts, and general movement in any of several areas, including but not limited to: pedagogy, theoretical frameworks, and career and/or graduate school opportunities.

It is likely that the information in this section remains fairly stable from year to year and requires only updating on an annual basis.

  1. Current Data Snapshot

The data snapshot compiles existing and available data about the program so that the faculty and leadership can consider the status and performance of the program in the context of each of the perspectives listed above. There are 5 components of the current data snapshot: student demographics; program productivity; student learning outcomes information and results; faculty information; and an analysis of the resources, leadership, and organizational structure of the program and the School within which it resides. Data and information are gathered from several sources over the course of Spring semester. The table below provides a list of recommended data to be included. Programs may wish to include other indicators and, in some years or programs, some data listed below may be unavailable.

Category Compiled by Description Estimated Timeline
Student Demographics Institutional Research Sex, Age, Ethnicity Mid-March
  Standard template to be constructed Mean GPA at 30 credit hours  
    Mean HS GPA  
    Mean Test (ACT/SAT) scores  
Program Productivity Institutional Research Number of applicants indicating intent to major in discipline

Number enrolled in pre-major or Area F courses

Number of Majors (separate by native to GGC and transfer in)
Mid-March
    Number of Graduates  
  Standard template to be constructed Mean Semester Load (student)  
    Number of FTE faculty  
    Mean Semester Load (faculty)  
    Mean student credit hours/faculty by semester  
    Program faculty/student ratio

Program mentor/mentee ratio
 
Student Learning Program Faculty Program outcomes: Summary of results February
    IEE outcomes: Summary and analysis of results from upper level courses March
    IEE (or GE)outcomes: Summary and analysis of results from Area F courses  
  Institutional Research Grade Distributions for

Lower Level (1xxx & 2xxx courses)

Upper Level (3xxx & 4xxx courses)
 
  Career Services and/or Program Faculty Job/Grad School placement of alumni April/Early May
Faculty Program Faculty and/or School Dean or Director Summary data on course evaluations April/Early May
    Summary data on faculty scholarship and service (grants, publications, etc.)  
    Faculty awards  
    Number who applied for and who received promotion

Recruitment data (# applicants/position; mean or median ratings for applicants
 
  Institutional Research Mean Faculty Salary Mid-March
    Mean Years at GGC  

The data snapshot concludes with a narrative description, prepared by the School Dean or Director, of the resources and the leadership and organizational structure of the program and the School within which it resides. This description is focused on articulating how the School and/or program allocates and uses its resources - money, space, time, personnel (and their specific skills) – to support the mission and the goals of the program.

  1. Program Strategic Plan Update

This section of the review provides a narrative analysis of the program’s role in supporting the College strategic plan, showing how the program level strategic goals serve to advance the College’s goals and plan. The program level strategic plan is reviewed with specific attention paid to identified or potential areas of growth and enhancement. The status of individual action steps within the strategic plan should be updated; completed action steps should be flagged and action steps that are behind schedule or that are due to be completed in the upcoming year should be highlighted.

The review and update of the program level strategic plan should be conducted by the faculty within the discipline.

  1. Comprehensive Review of Data

This section of the annual review provides the overall analysis of all data and information from the previous sections. In essence, this is a SWOT analysis of the current status of the program, explaining strengths, weaknesses, opportunities for growth, and threats to growth and viability- in relation to the four perspectives identified earlier? What opportunities for growth or enhancement can be identified? What conditions - on or off campus - present challenges to continued effectiveness and efficiency, to growth, or to enhancement of the program?

Although this section includes a narrative summary of the program’s student learning outcomes assessments for the previous calendar year, it considers operational needs and factors. A detailed analysis referencing best practices and disciplinary trends is particularly useful.

  1. Actions Needed

The final section of the review articulates the specific responses that would be appropriate responses to the comprehensive data review. This includes

  1. the previously articulated action plans that emerge from student learning outcomes assessment, but will also need to address actions in response to the strategic plan analysis and ideas arising from the review of best practices and disciplinary trends and
  2. an analysis of the resources required (people; funds; space; time; etc.) to mitigate the gap between the vision and the current state.
  1. Other

This section is reserved for discussion and supporting data for (a) any additional factors or information you consider important to the current state of the program or (b) the specified focus area for the year.

 

3.7 Regents Writing and Reading Skills Requirement

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.7.

 

3.8 Degrees

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.8.

3.8.1 General

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.8.1.

3.8.2 Graduate Degrees

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College does not offer graduate degrees.

3.8.3 Residence Requirement for Degree

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.8.3.

Georgia Gwinnett College requires all students to complete at least 25% of their overall semester hours of credit in residence prior to graduation. A student is defined to be “in residence” when he/she is taking Georgia Gwinnett College courses. Transient courses taken at another institution and courses transferred from other colleges are not considered to qualify a student as “in residence.”

Typically, the last thirty one (31) semester hours of a student’s academic program satisfies the requirement to be “in residence.” Alternative arrangements to using the last thirty one (31) semester hours of the student’s academic program must be approved by the appropriate School Dean with notification of the approval sent to the Registrar’s Office.

Under no circumstances will a student be permitted to graduate from Georgia Gwinnett College without satisfying the “in residence” requirement.

3.8.4 Honorary Degrees

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.8.4.

3.8.5 Diplomas Earned at Institutions Under Previous Name

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.8.5.

3.8.50 Posthumous Degrees

Reviewed February 16, 2016

A posthumous undergraduate degree may be awarded at the request of or with concurrence of the immediate family or guardian of the deceased and upon recommendation of the faculty. The following criteria apply:

  • The student had earned at least 90 semester hours of credit toward the degree, at least 30 of which were completed at GGC;
  • The student had earned at least 12 semester hours of upper-division coursework in his or her major;
  • The student’s GGC cumulative GPA was at least a 2.0.
 

3.9 Academic Advisement and Mentoring

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.9.

Each institution shall have a program for the advisement of its students. Academic advisement is the primary responsibility of the faculty and should be integrally related to the education process. Effective advisement shall be credited toward retention, tenure, and promotion. It shall be a specific topic of faculty evaluation (BR Minutes, 1980-81, P. 85).”

In keeping with its commitment to create a culture devoted to the holistic development of students, Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) embeds traditional academic advising (course selection and academic program planning) within a broader context of career planning, goal clarification, and personal growth. Georgia Gwinnett College has chosen the term “mentoring” for its academic advisement program to emphasize this focus on the whole student, rather than simply on academic matters.

Mission

The mission of the GGC Student Mentoring Program is facilitating student success, development, and retention by supporting the design and implementation of educational and career plans and enhancing student engagement in the academic community.

Academic Advising Model

In its broad definition of academic advising, the University System of Georgia asserts that academic advising “…represents…an opportunity for the faculty and the institution to express a special interest in both the personal and academic welfare of the students.” In keeping with this view, the overall goal of mentoring at GGC is to assure that all students achieve the Integrated Educational Experience (IEE) outcomes of the college:

  • Clearly communicate ideas in written and oral form
  • Demonstrate creativity and critical thinking in inter- and multidisciplinary contexts
  • Demonstrate effective use of information technology
  • Demonstrate an ability to collaborate in diverse and global contexts
  • Demonstrate an understanding of human and institutional decision making from multiple perspectives
  • Demonstrate an understanding of moral and ethical principles
  • Demonstrate and apply leadership principles

In support of these goals, mentoring at GGC encompasses the three broad areas of academic advising, career advising, and personal growth. Within these three broad areas, the outcomes of mentoring are:

Academic Advising

  • Development of academic program plans appropriate for students’ anticipated majors and career goals.
  • Progression toward completion of academic requirements and graduation at a reasonable rate.
  • Awareness of policies and procedures pertinent to completion of students’ planned academic programs.
  • Awareness of special academic opportunities such as study abroad, internships, etc.

Career Advising

  • Identification of educational and career objectives commensurate with students’ interests and abilities
  • Exploration of academic and other requirements for students’ chosen careers.
  • Exploration of post-graduate educational or employment opportunities for students’ chosen careers.

Personal Growth

  • Awareness of on-campus support available to students.
  • Engagement in the co-curricular program of the college.
  • Demonstrate leadership in the classroom, college, and/or community.
  • Make appropriate life decisions and accept personal responsibility for the consequences of decisions.

Ultimately, Georgia Gwinnett College graduates will be informed, engaged citizens of the community who are inspired to a lifetime of service.

Role of Faculty

All faculty and selected staff are engaged in mentoring students. Effective mentoring is a critical element in the annual evaluation process for faculty. All GGC students are assigned a faculty mentor at the point of matriculation and continue to be mentored by a faculty member throughout their educational careers.

3.9.1 Minority Advising Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Academic & Student Affairs Handbook Section 2.7.1

SOURCE: Memorandum from Vice Chancellor to Presidents, 7/9/93.

 

3.10 Academic Textbooks

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.10.

 

3.15 Classroom Visitors Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Faculty members have the right to allow or deny visitors to their classrooms, except for authorized GGC personnel or external visitors who have been authorized by the administration to visit for a valid business purpose. Faculty should give their designated Dean the courtesy of sufficient advance notice when inviting high profile visitors to class. The Office of Enrollment Management may bring prospective students and other guests to classroom sessions, and as a courtesy, will notify instructors in advance of these visits. Occasionally a student may wish to bring a visitor to campus for participation in various events. The following requirements are applicable to all guests who wish to visit instructional areas while a class is in session.

  1. Visitors entering the classroom environment must comply with all GGC institutional policies and procedures.
  2. Students must obtain prior permission from the instructor before allowing visitors to enter the classroom. Approval or denial of a student’s request is within the sole discretion of the instructor. This policy is applicable to students wishing to have adults and/or children visit classroom sessions.
  3. Even with prior permission, instructors retain the right to ask a student’s visitor(s) to leave the classroom should it be deemed necessary or appropriate by the instructor. If a visitor does not leave the classroom when requested, the instructor may contact GGC security for assistance.
  4. Although visitors may generally observe classroom sessions, visitor participation in activity classes, laboratory sessions or studio work is discouraged, unless the visitor has been invited into the class as part of the curriculum. Visitor participation in other types of classroom activities may be approved or denied by the instructor.
  5. Child visitors must be under the supervision of their adult sponsor at all times. Children may not visit a class if they are ill. Nor may children be admitted to a classroom or lab area where dangerous substances or equipment are stored.

This policy is generally applicable to all areas of campus operations; however exceptions may be requested by a parenting student experiencing childcare emergencies. On an emergency basis, a parenting student with a documented childcare related emergency, may request options including but not limited to 1) an excused absence from class ; 2) an extension of time for completion of course assignment; 3) a hardship withdrawal and /or incomplete. Allowances granted under this section shall be for emergency childcare related exceptions and may be limited in number and scope per term.

It remains the responsibility of the parenting student to manage his/her ongoing child care needs. The College does not accept or infer responsibility for the care of children under this policy. Student parents must supervise their children at all times when on campus.

Notwithstanding the above, a parenting student may not bring a child to the classroom for any reason, without the express authorization of the professor or campus official. Laboratory and other high safety areas may be excluded from this exception and access to these areas may be denied to children at any time.

In the event exceptions are allowed by faculty or others, said Authorization may be revoked at any time by a campus official, as allowances under this section are not an automatic right. The allowances may be requested by the parenting student and considered or denied by the instructor/campus official based on the totality of the circumstances, safety factors, and/ or the operational needs of the College.

  1. No animals are allowed in classrooms or other instructional areas, except for service animals aiding a person with a disability. In accordance with ADA standards, Effective March 15, 2011, “Service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition.”

Students who invite visitors into the classroom or lab environment are expected to explain applicable rules, including but not limited to safety related policies and practices.

  1. By entering the classroom environment, all visitors accept assumption of the risks of exposure to normal classroom/lab exercises and/or related experiments.

If you have any questions concerning the GGC Classroom Visitor Policy, please contact the Office of the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.

 

3.50 Academic Freedom Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Academic Freedom Policy

It is Georgia Gwinnett College’s policy to publish academic freedom statement in all major policy documents that are used by the faculty, staff, and students. GGC is committed to the protection of Academic Freedom by providing grievance procedures that can be used in causes of violation of Academic Freedom. Grievance procedures can be found in section V of the Faculty Manual of Policies and Procedures.

Academic Freedom statement

As a liberal arts college dedicated to the holistic development of students and to the production of graduates who can anticipate and respond effectively to the changing world, Georgia Gwinnett College affirms the vital role of diverse perspectives in helping students to develop their own knowledge and their ability to evaluate knowledge claims critically. The administration, faculty, staff and students share responsibility for fostering a climate that is favorable to the free exchange of ideas and to the examination of conflicting ideas and interpretations using generally accepted disciplinary standards of inquiry. Freedom of speech and expression extends to all members of the academic community, subject to commonly accepted constitutional limits on speech that is libelous or slanderous, incites violence, or discriminates against or harasses others.

Academic freedom is essential to the integrity of intellectual inquiry and scholarly criticism, to the dissemination of knowledge, and to the search for truth and wisdom. It is the foundation upon which the all of the intellectual activity of the college rests. Faculty are free to pursue scholarly interests without fear of censure, discipline, or reprisal. This freedom extends to the display, publication, and performance of creative work. Faculty may speak freely on all matters of college governance, and may speak, work, or act as an individual in the public arena without fear of institutional discipline or restraint.

A fundamental goal of liberal arts education is the development of students’ skills of analysis and critical inquiry. To this end, faculty are free to teach and discuss any aspect of a given topic pertinent to the course being taught as a means of teaching students to explore and evaluate competing perspectives and interpretations as they learn to assemble their own informed judgments. Faculty have a concomitant responsibility to teach students to evaluate knowledge claims using standards of evidence accepted in their respective disciplines, and to promote respect for competing views offered by others. Students have the right to a safe classroom environment in which they can explore controversial ideas in an atmosphere characterized by openness, tolerance and civility, and where they will be graded only on the intellectual merits of their work.

The College has established formal grievance procedures for addressing claims of unfair academic treatment by any member of the campus community.

Our view of academic freedom incorporates the principles of academic freedom stated by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP, 1940) as follows:

  1. The teacher is entitled to full freedom in research and in the publication of the results, subject to the adequate performance of [his/her] other academic duties; but research for pecuniary return should be based upon an understanding with the authorities of the institution.
  2. The teacher is entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing [his/her] subject, but [he/she] should be careful not to introduce into his/her teaching controversial matter which has no relation to his/her subject. Limitations of academic freedom because of religious or other aims of the institution should be clearly stated in writing at the time of the appointment.
  3. The college or university teacher is a citizen, a member of a learned profession, and an officer of an educational institution. When [he/she] speaks or writes as a citizen, [he/she] should be free from institutional censorship or discipline, but [his/her] special position in the community imposes obligations. As a person of learning and an educational officer, [he/she] should remember that the public may judge [his/her] profession and [his/her] institution by [his/her] utterances. Hence [he/she] should at all times be accurate, should exercise appropriate restraint, should show respect for the opinions of others, and should make every effort to indicate that [he/she] is not an institutional spokesperson.

The faculty also endorses the Statement on Academic Rights and Responsibilities published by the American Council on Education (2005).

 

3.52 Centers and Institutes

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College currently does not have Centers or Institutes but will at a later date. Policies will be developed prior to establishing Centers and Institutes.

 

3.53 Student Study Abroad and Service Learning Policies

Reviewed August 4, 2016

The following policies guide Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) students who wish to study or perform service abroad.

3.53.1 Types of GGC Study Abroad Programs

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College considers study abroad one of the most important experiences that the institution can offer its students. GGC sponsors a variety of study abroad programs, including spring break, maymester, summer, semester, and academic-year programs. These programs fall under the following categories:

  1. GGC Faculty-Led Study Abroad Programs: The Office of Internationalization works with GGC’s academic schools to develop faculty-led study abroad programs. These programs are primarily spring break, maymester, and summer programs led and taught by GGC faculty members. The programs tend to focus on a particular topic or theme and generally attract between 10 and 20 students, though some programs may be larger. These programs grant GGC resident credit, and no course substitution or transient permission is necessary. Students participate in lectures, site visits, excursions, and tours as part of the program. These programs can last between ten days and six weeks. Students find the programs a great way to get to know their professors and other GGC students while earning GGC credits and grades. Financial aid and scholarships are available.
  2. GGC Exchange Programs: Currently, GGC has formal exchange agreements with these foreign universities: Hanyang University (South Korea), Sookmyung University (South Korea), Vytautas Magnus University (Lithuania), Thai Nguyen University of Technology (Vietnam), University of Prizren (Kosovo), Nguyen Tat Thanh University (Vietnam), and such other universities as may be added from time to time. GGC exchanges will offer semester or academic-year studies at a foreign university, and classes may be taught in the host language, English, or both. Exchange programs are among the most affordable study abroad options, as the costs are comparable to spending the semester at GGC. Students who are very independent tend to do well on exchange programs. These programs offer a high level of cultural immersion as GGC students take their courses at the overseas partner institution with local students. Financial aid and scholarships are available. Courses taken through GGC exchanges or with GGC exchange partner universities count as transfer credit.
  3. USG Affiliate Programs: In cases where one of the above-referenced GGC programs does not suit the student’s academic needs or interests, the student may choose from many other programs within the University System of Georgia such as the USG European Council programs or the USG Asia Council programs.
  4. GGC International Internships and Independent Study: Students interested in pursuing credit-bearing international internships or independent study under the supervision of a GGC professor should contact the Office of Internationalization. There are some additional requirements related to insurance and documentation, since the student is not on an organized study abroad program. No course substitution or transient permission is necessary. If a student pursues a non-GGC-supervised international internship, course approval and transient permission is required.

3.53.2 Study Abroad Program Selection and Approval

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Study Abroad Intake Process: Getting Started Account

The first step for GGC students interested in studying abroad is to contact the Office of Internationalization (OI) in order to create a Getting Started account in Terra Dotta. Students should make an appointment to visit in person. The Office of Internationalization’s goals for this initial intake process are as follows:

  1. Set appropriate student expectations regarding program options and requirements.
  2. Explain in detail the various study abroad program options available to GGC students.
  3. Verify that applicants are GGC students who meet the basic requirements, including number of collegiate credit hours and GPA. Students will also understand that certain study abroad programs may require a higher GPA or have other prerequisites.
  4. Discuss the basics of studying abroad, including choice of destination, types of programs, financial aid, availability of scholarships, credit transfer, passport/visa issues, and health and safety abroad.

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that, through his/her advisor, this is the right course of study.

If the student needs to receive course approval, s/he will work with his/her designated point of contact (POC) for study abroad to make sure courses will count towards his/her academic program. If a student selects a non-GGC study abroad program, the student must obtain approval from his/her POC or faculty mentor as well as the appropriate dean. After this, depending on the type of program, the student will do one of the following:

  • For GGC Faculty-led Study Abroad Programs
  1. Meet with the faculty leading the study abroad program for initial approval to participate in the program.
  2. Apply for the program in Terra Dotta.
  3. Forms to be completed in Terra Dotta:
  1. GGC Institutional Study Abroad Application Form
  2. Education Abroad Emergency Contacts
  3. Education Abroad Participant Health Statement
  4. Liability Participant Agreement-Adults OR Liability Participant Agreement-Minors
  5. Financial Aid Form (optional)
  6. Passport Information (including visa information for non U.S. citizens)
  • For Affiliate Programs and Non-GGC Study Abroad Programs
  1. Apply for the program in Terra Dotta.
  2. Complete and submit the following forms in Terra Dotta:
  1. Study Abroad Course Approval Form (in order to receive credit approval)
  2. Education Abroad Emergency Contacts
  3. Education Abroad Participant Health Statement
  4. Liability Participant Agreement-Adults OR Liability Participant Agreement-Minors
  5. Financial Aid Form (optional)
  6. Passport Information (including visa information for non-U.S. citizens)
  7. Supplemental Education Abroad Information
  8. Copy of any and all forms completed for program provider
  9. GGC Request for Transient Permission Form** or a Consortium Agreement Form (unless advised otherwise)
  10. Course Substitution Form
  1. Obtain signatures of approval as part of their study abroad application and Individual advisement process from the following:
  1. School Point of Contact (POC) for study abroad
  2. School Dean
  3. Wellness Center Representative
  4. Office of Internationalization Assistant Director for Education Abroad

Note: Students for both GGC faculty-led study abroad programs and non-GGC study abroad programs are required to submit their applications within the published deadlines, as well as attend all mandatory pre-departure orientations.

3.53.3 Service-Learning Programs

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Service learning is a form of study abroad, except that it may or may not be credit bearing. It focuses on contemporary global and transnational issues and emphasizes human connection, thereby challenging notions of nations and cultures. Service learning incorporates community work into students’ educational experiences, by providing real-world learning experiences that enhance students’ academic learning while providing a tangible benefit for the community in which activity occurs. The only existing international service learning program at GGC is the Global Civic Engagement Program, a non-credit service learning program which offers students non-credit experiences in activities which address human needs or learning about an international community. In many instances, the community and student/institution are equal partners. The program requires students to dedicate thought, time, and ability to working with communities to learn about local challenges, while digging into complicated questions of power, injustice, and inequality in a global context. Each gains from the other by having significant opportunities to reflect on their service and experiences and engage theory and knowledge reflexively with the experience. The Global Civic Engagement Program is organized by the Office of Internationalization; however, other GGC faculty/staff members may also establish and lead their own service-learning programs.

Service Learning Intake Process

Students interested in participating in a GGC service-learning program should do the following:

  1. Meet with the faculty or staff member leading the program for initial approval to participate in it.
  2. Complete and submit a GGC Institutional Service-Learning Application in Terra Dotta.

Note: Students for both study abroad and service learning programs are required to submit their service-learning applications within the published deadlines, as well as attend all mandatory pre-departure orientations.

3.53.4 Eligibility and Requirements

Reviewed August 4, 2016

  1. GGC students who wish to participate in study abroad programs must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5; students who wish to participate in service learning abroad must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0.
  2. Students may not be on any form of academic probation, suspension, dismissal, warnings, or continued probation.
  3. Certain study abroad programs may require higher GPAs or other prerequisites.
  4. Students must have achieved the required GGC GPA by the application deadline of the study abroad program.
  5. GGC students are eligible to study abroad participate in service-learning programs after completing a minimum of 24 collegiate credit hours by the program application deadline. Transfer students must complete a minimum of one full-time semester at GGC before they may study or serve abroad. International students wishing to study abroad should consult the Office of Internationalization to verify that their student visa will allow them to study or serve in the proposed host country.

3.53.5 Transfer Credit for Study Abroad

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Credit vs. Non-Credit: Not every experiential program abroad is credit bearing. For an education abroad program, students must be sure to verify whether it is credit bearing or not. If it is credit bearing, students must verify how many credits and whether the credits will transfer to their GGC program of study.

Affiliate Programs and Non-GGC Programs: GGC has agreements with several affiliate program providers, and students are encouraged to consider using one of these providers. For non-GGC and affiliate study abroad programs, courses will be reflected on another institution’s transcript and will count as transfer credit at GGC. Please note the following important policies:

  1. Completed GGC Request for Transient Permission or a Consortium Agreement Form (unless advised otherwise), Course Substitution, and Study Abroad Course Approval forms are required prior to registering for the program. These forms allow students to plan how courses will transfer in. They also enable students to maintain student status at GGC for financial aid and other purposes.
  2. Courses may transfer as major, minor, core, or elective credit. The appropriate GGC school(s), in collaboration with the Registrar’s Office, will determine how the course(s) will transfer and how the course(s) will be applied towards degree requirements.
  3. GGC students should contact the Office of Internationalization as early in the planning process as possible to review the steps required for completing the transfer credit or transient permission approval process.
  4. Transfer credit will be given only for courses that are from accredited U.S. universities/colleges and/or operated by approved GGC study abroad affiliates or consortia.
  5. Other USG Programs: These programs include all public colleges and universities within the state. GGC students may be eligible to participate in study abroad opportunities through these institutions. Students should consider the following regarding USG programs:
  • USG programs tend to be around the same cost and are often led by a faculty member from the host USG institution.
  • To participate in a program through another USG institution, students will need to apply as “transient” students to that school as well as apply to their particular study abroad program.
  • Each institution is different, so students should pay special attention to the instructions given to them by the contact person for that specific USG study abroad program.
  1. Foreign Language Programs/Schools: In order for credit to transfer to Georgia Gwinnett College, it must originate from an accredited institution of higher learning in the US or be evaluated by one of the approved credential/evaluation services.

3.53.6 Financial Aid and Requirements

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Financial Aid

GGC students can use their federal and state aid, including the HOPE Scholarship, for study abroad. Financial aid can be used on any study abroad program for which the student will receive academic credit. Students studying abroad for an academic year are eligible to apply for both the fall and spring grant competitions. Interested students should make an appointment to meet with Office of Internationalization or Financial Aid.

Important Note: While most students are able to use financial aid to assist with the cost of studying abroad, it is very likely that the student will need to cover these expenses up front and be reimbursed at a later date by financial aid or other scholarships. Due to federal regulations, these funds very rarely come through in time to use them to cover study abroad expenses in advance. Students should be aware of this and make arrangements to have their expenses covered in the meantime.

Securing Financial Aid for Study Abroad

Students should complete their FAFSA application well in advance of their term abroad. They should verify how their financial aid package will apply to their study abroad program. This is easily accomplished by meeting with a Financial Aid counselor.

International Education Fee (IEF) Stipends

The GGC Study Abroad Grant Program is funded by a mandatory international education fee (IEF). The program has limited funds, and applications will be accepted as long as there are funds. Application deadlines are as follows:

Term Abroad Deadline
Fall April 15
Spring November 15
Maymester/Summer March 15

Criteria for IEF Stipends: All IEF stipend applicants must:

  1. Have been enrolled the previous semester and be working toward completion of a degree program at GGC,
  2. Have earned 24 credit hours,
  3. Have a minimum institutional GPA of 2.5 (transfer GPA not considered),
  4. Be in the process of enrolling in a study abroad program for which they will receive academic credit.

Note:

  • Meeting eligibility requirements and submitting an application do not guarantee an award.
  • IEF funds may not be used towards study in countries that are currently under a U.S. Department of State Travel Warning.
  • Maximum number of awards per student during his/her time at GGC: 2

Award Amounts: If approved for an IEF stipend, students may receive the following amounts:

  • Less than 28 days: $500
  • 28-41 days: $700
  • 42 days or longer: up to $1,500 (depending on availability of funds)

Considerations for determining award amounts for programs lasting four weeks or longer:

  • Financial need (based on applicant’s financial aid package),
  • Program sponsor (GGC or other),
  • Program location (traditional or non-traditional),
  • Previous international experience and OI funding,
  • Number of credits being earned (applicable only to maymester and summer programs)

Other Study Abroad Scholarships & Funding Sources: Students should contact the Office of Internationalization to inquire about other types of external scholarships and funding sources.

3.53.7 Education Abroad Student Pre-Departure Checklist

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Be sure to check off all applicable items below before you depart for your program:

  1. Obtain/renew your passport and make sure it is signed and valid for at least six months after your return.
  2. Obtain a visa, if required.
  3. Determine whether your file is complete for your study abroad program with the Office of Internationalization.
  4. Meet with your academic advisor or school Point of Contact to discuss your course selection and have them approve your selection (see Study Abroad Approval Form).
  5. Finalize your financial aid (if applicable).
  6. For semester programs: Make necessary housing arrangements at GGC for your return.
  7. Learn about your host country.
  8. Pay any remaining program balance on your study abroad program.
  9. If you are registered at GGC: Pay your tuition and fees before departure.
  10. Obtain a medical release from your doctor allowing you to travel to the host country (if this is required).
  11. Finalize registration for courses if necessary.
  12. Register with the US Department of State Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).
  13. Reconfirm your flight(s) to your destination.
  14. Check your airline for any baggage restrictions.
  15. Make a copy of your passport and other important documents for your family.
  16. Make a list of all contact information in your host country. Carry a copy with you and leave one with your family.
  17. Bring copies of insurance cards, medical prescriptions, passport/visa, ID cards.
  18. Inform your credit card company and/or bank of your travel dates.

3.53.8 Summary of Student Obligations (Mandatory) for Study Abroad And Service Learning

Reviewed August 4, 2016

For study abroad: Students ensure that, through their academic advisors, they choose the right course of study.

For service learning: Students ensure that, through their advisors, they choose the right service program.

All students:

  1. Complete, sign, and submit to the Office of Internationalization all required forms, including an application form, a Waiver of Liability, and the pre-departure checklist for their program within the published deadlines. Electronic forms must also be duly completed and submitted.
  2. Submit to the Office of Internationalization all required documents.
  3. Obtain signatures of approval as part of their study abroad application and individual advisement process.
  4. Attend all mandatory pre-departure orientations.
  5. Sign up for the US Department of State Smart Traveller Enrollment Program.
  6. Take all recommended travel prophylaxes/shots, and according to the recommended schedule.
  7. Secure and take with them all required travel documents, including passport, visa, and health card. Failure to do so would result in the student not traveling. GGC is not responsible for ensuring participants have the appropriate travel documents.
 

3.54 Study Abroad and Service Learning Policies and Procedures For Program Directors

Reviewed August 4, 2016

3.54.1 Introduction

Reviewed August 4, 2016

The Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) Office of Internationalization (OI) has prepared this manual to serve as a guide to faculty and staff as they develop and/or administer short-term study abroad or overseas service-learning programs. Faculty-/staff-led programs are designed by faculty or staff and administered by OI. Many of the policies in this manual emanate from the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.

Study abroad and service-learning programs can be a life-changing experience for students and faculty and are a dynamic process that requires much preliminary work. In keeping with the objectives of the Georgia Gwinnett College Student Mentoring Program, study abroad and service-learning advisement at GGC are committed to “facilitating student success, development, and retention by supporting the design and implementation of educational and career plans and enhancing student engagement in the academic community.”

In addition, study abroad advisement is aligned with the University System of Georgia’s assertion that academic advising “…represents…an opportunity for the…institution to express a special interest in both the personal and academic welfare of the students.” In keeping with this view, study abroad advisement at GGC is structured to support participating study abroad students’ achievement of the Integrated Educational Experience (IEE) outcomes of the college.

3.54.2 Terminology

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Education Abroad is an umbrella term for all experiential learning programs which occur in a different country.

Study Abroad refers to a credit-bearing program of study in a foreign country. Participants earn grades for the course(s) they take, and the grades may or may not transfer to the participant’s home campus (see section below for specifics).

Service Learning refers to an experiential program in which students participate in an organized activity which meets identified community needs which enable participants to have a better understanding of course content, a broader appreciation of the discipline, and a better sense of civic duty. Service learning may or may not be credit bearing.

Provider-organized Programs are those which rely partly or entirely on third-party providers for logistical arrangements, including receiving program deposits/fees, travel (international and in country), accommodations, meals, coordination of the educational and cultural components, and safety and security.

Non-Provider-organized Programs are organized and led by the program director, who is responsible for all or most of the logistical arrangements. Generally, prior to leading the group abroad, the faculty director(s) should be thoroughly familiar with the program and site, as well as have an in-country coordinator to assist him/her with logistical arrangements before, during, and sometimes after the program. With this type of support, the faculty may sub-contract various program services.

A Program Director is a faculty or staff member responsible for writing the proposal and establishing the program. For faculty-led programs without third-party support, the program directors must have another faculty or staff member on the program as back-up in case of emergencies.

3.54.3 Policies for Faculty-Led Study Abroad and Service-Learning Programs

Reviewed August 4, 2016

The following policies and procedures guide Georgia Gwinnett College faculty and staff who wish to develop and lead a study abroad or service-learning program. These policies and procedures should not be considered an exhaustive document, but should function as a guide for potential program directors. At GGC, only full-time faculty or staff (also referred to as a program director in this manual) may lead or direct study abroad or service-learning programs. Also, only full-time faculty members may teach in a credit-bearing program.

Any GGC full-time faculty or staff member who wishes to develop a study abroad or service-learning program should work closely with his/her dean or supervisor and the Office of Internationalization to ensure that he/she is following the essential steps in the development and approval process and that the program meets University System of Georgia and GGC requirements. No GGC faculty or staff member may lead more than two programs abroad in a single academic year.

3.54.3.1 Academic Integrity for Credit-Bearing Programs

Reviewed August 4, 2016

For all credit-bearing programs, the faculty member must ensure that it is academically substantive and that credit awards are in line with the program curriculum, contact hours, and assignments. The responsibility for ensuring academic credit rests with the dean. Course plans should both take advantage of the international setting and ensure academic rigor. Among the factors to consider are the following:

  • Contact Hours: When calculating contact hours, field experiences that have academic value and are led by faculty can be incorporated with classroom instruction. One hour of field experience counts as a half-hour of classroom instruction. It is standard practice to reduce the number of classroom contact hours required for credit when the learning is taking place abroad. The usual calculation is to reduce the normal number of contact hours by 20%. If 3 semester credit hours normally require 45 contact hours, then 45 X 80% = 36 (the number of contact hours required for a study abroad program that carries 3 semester credit hours).
  • Class Attendance: Typically, fewer (or no) absences should be allowed on short-term credit-bearing programs.
  • Syllabus: The syllabus will be prepared during the initial proposal development stage. Reading assignments for students before the international trip and pre-departure orientations and/or classes should be included, so students may take maximum advantage of the overseas experience. While overseas, faculty should not depend on the availability of electronic media they normally would use on campus.
  • Evaluations: Continuous formative program evaluation is essential for early problem discovery, troubleshooting, and eventual program success. Weekly informal on-site program wrap-up evaluations by the program director are recommended. Evaluation forms should be prepared and distributed to students in a timely manner. The forms should address accommodations, meals, field trips, class facilities, course materials, texts, and quality of instruction and program administration. Student journals may be employed as part of the evaluation process.

3.54.3.2 Logistical Considerations

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Considerations in Program Logistics

  • Program Model: experiential, on-the-go study program in several locations, or structured classroom work with outings?
  • Location: housed in one place or be on the move; any U.S. Department of State warnings or travel advisories?
  • Affiliation Abroad: connected with a partner institution abroad, contracting with an independent service provider, or using contacts of the program director?
  • Duration: how many weeks and exact dates of the program, including travel days?
  • High-Risk Activities: Programs including activities during which students may be at risk of physical injury such as horseback riding, surfing, scuba diving, mountain climbing, or swimming as part of the program-related activities should consider a rider insurance policy to cover the increased risk and liability exposure to the institution. Program directors should consult with the Office of Internationalization if they plan to include these types of activities in the program design.
  • Climate: what is it like at that time of year; if the weather might affect program activities?

Considerations in On-site Arrangements

  • Where and what kind of accommodation is available: hotel, youth hostel, homestay, university residence halls, conference facilities?
  • Meals included with accommodation or an additional expense?
  • Ground transportation: cost, safety, and reliability of the transport mode; maximum number of passengers on buses?
  • Classroom space and rental cost
  • Cultural and educational outings
  • Accessibility for students with disabilities
  • Participants: maximum and minimum limits; open to non-GGC students; open to non-degree students; expectations for participation
  • Group Travel: For programs with group flights, the program director should have at least one designee accompany the group to the overseas location. If the return trip is not a direct flight to a U.S. port of entry, the program director or his/her designee should accompany the students back home.

Considerations in Academic Content

  • Structure: if the program tied to a semester course as a “trailer” or a stand alone?
  • Credit: how many credits available?
  • Selection of Courses: Will the course(s) offered apply to major, minor, or general education requirements; or will the course(s) be considered elective credit? Is a new course being created or housed under an umbrella course? Are there prerequisites to the course?
  • Contact Hours: readings, assignments, and meetings before departure; each credit requires the provision of a minimum of 12 contact hours of instruction per 3 credit-hour course (i.e., 80% of the on-campus requirement).

Considerations in Information to Students

  • Course Requirements: work students will need to complete to earn credit; how they will be graded?
  • Itinerary: a day-to-day itinerary should be provided for students prior to departure.
  • Selection Criteria: minimum GPA; upper- or lower-class students; open to non-GGC students; must be a major or minor in the program.
  • Known Risks or Dangers: information about road conditions, areas of disease, forces of nature (earthquake region, avalanches, extreme heat or cold, typhoons, etc.); political or social instability must be researched and made known to participants.
  • Pre-departure Orientation: attendance required.

Resources

  • Faculty are welcome to review past faculty-led program proposals from OI.
  • For more ideas and information, the following resource is available from OIE:
    Spencer, Sarah E., and Kathy Tuna, eds. The Guide to Successful Short-Term Programs Abroad. Washington, DC: NAFSA: Association of International Educators, 2002.
    Bolen, Mell C. A Guide to Outcomes Assessment in Education Abroad. Forum on Education Abroad, 2006.
    Brewer, Elizabeth, and Kiran Cunningham, eds. Integrating Study Abroad into the Curriculum: Theory and Practice across the Discipline. Sterling, Virginia: Stylus, 2009.

3.54.4 Faculty Compensation For Study Abroad

Reviewed August 4, 2016

The following compensation policy applies to both GGC programs and USG programs. Faculty members serving under an academic year contract will be eligible to earn up to 30% of their base salary (or the GGC standard rate per three-credit hour course) during the summer months for teaching on a summer study abroad program. Faculty members serving under a twelve-month fiscal year contract are ineligible for summer pay. If faculty are teaching a study abroad course during fall or spring semester and the course is part of their normal teaching load, the faculty will not receive extra pay. If the course is considered a course overload during the fall or spring semester, the faculty will receive instructional overload pay in the spring of the academic year in which the course is taught. The applicable extra compensation amount for overload duties shall be disclosed at time of notification to the employee, or as soon as possible. For contract employees, the extra compensation shall be noted on the Academic Year and Fiscal Year Contract Addendum. In addition, limited summer non-teaching assignments may be offered for study abroad programs. If a faculty member’s services are needed beyond the full-time academic year commitment, a separate written agreement will be offered covering information on the study abroad program; said agreement shall govern the service commitment and level of compensation. Faculty members will be compensated according to the following conditions:

  • The GGC standard rate of base pay salary for teaching a three- or four-credit hour non-laboratory study abroad course during summer
  • Up to five percent of base pay salary for teaching a one-credit hour laboratory study abroad course during summer
  • Compensation for study abroad courses not covered by the above two conditions will be determined by recommendation of the Dean and approval by the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost (Sr. VPASA/Provost).
  • Compensation for non-teaching summer assignments or special programs will be determined by recommendation of the Dean and approval by the Sr. VPASA/Provost.
  • Extra compensation is not provided for teaching a course during fall or spring as part of teaching load.
  • The instructional overload will be applied in the spring for teaching a course as an overload in fall or spring.

Should the number of students who are accepted and paid in full drop below the requisite head count of 10 (non duplicated headcount) GGC students per faculty member, then the faculty member must receive approval from his/her dean to continue the program with under 10 students. With approval from the dean to continue with a program with less than 10 students, the faculty member will be paid based on the pay scale below (which in turn is based on the number of students who paid the program fees in full), or the faculty member may choose not to participate in the program. If any GGC faculty member is a USG Council administrator in any capacity, s/he will not be paid anything additional for the administrative role.

Number of Students Compensation (for 3 Credit Hours)
8-9 students 1% less than standard pay
6-7 students 2% less than standard pay
5 students or fewer $300 per student per class

3.54.5 Student Recruitment for USG Programs

Reviewed August 4, 2016

GGC faculty receiving approval to teach in any of the University System of Georgia’s (USG) summer study abroad programs are required to consult and collaborate with the Office of Internationalization in developing their recruitment plans. Proposers must commit to investing additional time in the recruitment of students during fall and spring semesters. Recruitment activities include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Participating in the study abroad information sessions, sponsored by the Office of Internationalization
  • Speaking in the faculty member’s classes and those of his/her colleagues
  • Participating in the annual GGC study abroad fair (fall)
  • Distributing program and course material to prospective participants
  • Encouraging prospective participants to set up an appointment with the Office of Internationalization to begin the study abroad approval process

3.54.6 Program Proposal Development and Approval

Reviewed August 4, 2016

The approval process is modeled on the recommendations of NAFSA: Association of International Educators, the premier national organization in education abroad. These policies and procedures, once successfully completed, will not only enable programs to be approved, but will also serve as tools in the ongoing management of programs.

Program Directors should begin the approval process at least 18 months prior to the first term they wish to offer their program; otherwise, GGC cannot guarantee that the program will be approved in time.

3.54.6.1 Preliminary Proposal

Reviewed August 4, 2016

  1. Proposers should complete the brief preliminary proposal included in this document. The Office of Internationalization will provide suggestions for evaluating the viability of a program prior to preparing a preliminary proposal. Proposers should submit this proposal through their school, securing the approval and signature of the dean or supervisor. Such approval indicates the school supports the idea and need for the program, the proposer’s qualifications to direct the program, and its general fit within the curriculum or, for service-learning programs, the department or GGC as a whole.
  2. If the school dean or supervisor approves the proposal, the proposer should submit the detailed proposal–both electronically and in signed hard copy–to the Director of Internationalization by April 1 of the preceding academic year.
  3. The Office of Internationalization will determine whether the proposal should move forward as is, not move forward, or be modified. The Director of Internationalization will discuss any concerns with the proposal with the proposer and his/her dean.

3.54.6.2 Format and Checklist for Faculty-Led Study Abroad and Service-Learning Preliminary Proposals

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Attach a brief description of the proposed program, including the following information:

  1. Nature and purpose of the program
  2. For credit-bearing programs: Description of the academic component, including type and number of credit hours to be awarded, number of contact hours, method of evaluation, course title(s) and number(s)
  3. For non-credit programs: Description of the service component, including location(s), project(s), number of contact hours, and method of evaluation
  4. Examples of program-related activities and excursions
  5. Projected number of students and faculty/staff
  6. Projected cost to each participant
  7. Amount and source of faculty/staff compensation
  8. Program affiliations
  9. Security and travel arrangements
  10. Country/countries and cities to be visited

3.54.6.3 Detailed Proposal

Reviewed August 4, 2016

  1. If the preliminary proposal is approved by the dean or supervisor and the Director of Internationalization, the faculty/staff member should prepare a detailed program proposal. The detailed proposal addresses academic matters (such as courses, instructors, and educational excursions), logistics (such as housing, meals, and ground transportation), risk management (such as safety, security, and the health and behavioral information that will be provided to students at orientation), affiliation arrangements (if the faculty member will be using private travel providers and/or host institutions), and fiscal viability as demonstrated by a detailed budget. Templates for these matters are in the appendix.
  2. The detailed proposal should be reviewed by the school dean or supervisor.
  3. If the proposal meets all general requirements, it is reviewed by the Education Abroad Program Safety Committee to ensure the proposal meets the necessary safety and security guidelines.
  4. The proposer will normally hear from the Office of Internationalization within two weeks of submitting the detailed proposal. If need be, the Director of Internationalization will dialog with the proposer(s) until the proposal meets the stated requirements. The proposal then goes to the Vice President for Business and Finance and the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost for recommendations, and finally to the President for approval. Upon approval, the proposal is returned to the Director of Internationalization, who notifies the proposer(s). Only after the proposer(s) receives notification from the Office of Internationalization of official approval, may they begin marketing the program and open an agency account in order to receive student fees. The Office of Internationalization and Accounting Services would gladly provide assistance with opening an agency account.

Note: If the program is not approved, the Office of Internationalization will notify the proposer in writing (with a copy to the appropriate dean or supervisor). The Director of Internationalization will be available to discuss the non-approval with the proposer. All proposals require approval by the following persons:

  1. School Dean or Supervisor
  2. Director of Internationalization
  3. Vice President for Business and Finance
  4. Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost
  5. President or designee

3.54.6.4 Format and Checklist for Faculty-Led or Service Learning Detailed Proposals

Reviewed August 4, 2016

In preparing the proposal, the faculty/staff member should address the following:

  1. Mission Statement for the proposed program
  2. Explanation of the nature and purpose of the program:

For credit-bearing programs:

  1. Description of the academic component
  2. Course title(s) and number(s)
  3. Number of contact hours (field trips count at ½ rate)
  4. Sample syllabus for each course

For service-learning programs:

  1. Description of the service component
  2. Plan for community engagement

For all programs:

  1. Methods for student evaluation
  2. Course-related field trips, activities and excursions
  3. Justification for any program that is less than one week long or carries less than 3 credits
  4. Faculty/staff member’s expertise relevant to the proposed program
  1. Off-campus programming experience of proposer
  2. Student behavior guidelines and/or policy contracts (sample contracts and handbooks)
  3. Projected number of students and faculty/staff members
  4. Program budget, including projected cost to each student (attach Excel spreadsheet)
  5. Room and board arrangements
  6. Source of faculty/staff compensation
  7. Description of program affiliations, host institutions, and service providers
  8. Travel arrangements, including all countries and cities to be visited
  9. Site visit report (if applicable)
  10. Security precautions and arrangements
  11. Recruitment plan
  12. Plan for administering the mandatory pre-departure and post-program evaluation

3.54.7 Fiscal Procedures

Reviewed August 4, 2016

A key element of running a study abroad or service-learning program is making sure there is enough money in the program budget to pay for all program costs and that the management of funds follows federal, state, and institutional guidelines. This section provides a procedure for the management of the finances of the program. Program directors should follow GGC and USG financial management guidelines.

3.54.7.1 Budgeting

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Sound budgeting avoids funding shortages and keeps student costs down. The following guidelines should be used to create a budget:

  1. Determine an enrollment number for which the program will be budgeted based on an estimate of student interest and the program capacity.
  2. Figure a total per-student package cost by dividing group expenses by the target number of students.
  3. If faculty/staff expenses/meals are not paid through another source, faculty/staff expenses and a daily food allowance (per diem) for each faculty/staff participant should be included in the calculation of the total per-student package cost. For a meal allowance, the Federal M&IE (meals and incidental expenses) rate should be used.
  4. A contingency fund cushion of 5%-10% (or minimum $100 per student) for administrative overhead, variation in exchange rates, and price fluctuations should be added to the total package figure.
  5. A conservative estimate for exchange rates should be used as rates may fluctuate.
  6. For study abroad programs: Do not include tuition or faculty salaries as part of the program budget; these will be handled through separate accounts.

3.54.7.2 Budget Items

Reviewed August 4, 2016

The following items (if they are parts of the program package) must be included in the study abroad budget:

  1. International Travel
  2. International Insurance (USG requires insurance)
  3. Accommodations
  4. Meals (for faculty/staff, this may be in the form of a per diem)
  5. In-country Travel
  6. Entrance Fees and Guided Tours
  7. Faculty Expenses
  8. Facility Rental
  9. Guest Lectures

3.54.7.3 Application Fees and Payment Schedules

Reviewed August 4, 2016

The following are guidelines for application deposits, student payment options, and payment schedules. Funds will be needed well in advance to cover items like airfare deposits and accommodation costs; however, many students will not be able to pay the entire package cost in one payment. Breaking up the package cost into an application deposit and two or more payments should help program directors obtain funds early enough to pay advance costs while maintaining program affordability. To that end, the following is recommended:

  1. An application should be considered incomplete without the application fee. The application fee may be refundable up to a certain date or may be non-refundable. A detailed refund policy should be included in the program literature. The remainder of the program fees may be broken down into two or more partial payments.
  2. Application fees should be added to the cost of program which students pay. The remainder of the package cost may be paid by check, money order, or credit card.

3.54.7.4 Account Management and Record Keeping

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Program directors must keep accurate financial records and follow guidelines on the use of student money established by the University System of Georgia and GGC. The following guidelines will help program directors manage their study abroad agency account and keep appropriate financial records:

  1. As soon as plans are underway to launch the program, an agency account in which to deposit program fees and from which to draft checks to pay for program expenses should be established.
  2. Arrangements should be made to receive reports from Financial Services or Accounting. In addition to these reports, the program director should maintain records to track the balance in the agency account.
  3. For credit-bearing programs: It is important that student tuition payments be kept separate from program fees. Charges for tuition/fees will appear on students’ accounts when they register for classes.
  4. All student program fees must be paid to “Georgia Gwinnett College.” If a check is returned, the program director will be notified and should then contact the student and try to collect payment. Payment due dates should be far enough in advance of the travel dates so that if a student is dropped for non-payment, that student’s air and hotel accommodations can be canceled without penalty.
  5. Once there are funds in an agency account, the program director may make payment requests for program services. The program director should maintain copies of all invoices and receipts. The Assistant Director for Education Abroad will provide guidance regarding the proper procedures.

3.54.7.5 Financial Aid

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Program directors should become familiar with the use of student financial aid and any available supplemental funding to pay for study abroad expenses. Students may use their state (including the HOPE Grant-only for GGC and USG programs), federal, and private financial aid packages to cover the costs of studying abroad for credit that will apply to their degree program. Therefore, program directors must ensure that the credit awarded through the study abroad program will advance students receiving financial aid toward completion of their degree programs.

Students who rely on financial aid should consult the Office of Internationalization and then the Financial Aid Office for guidance. Program directors should advise students that if money is needed for a summer program, they should make sure there will be enough funds available from their annual package to cover summer costs. Students who have not applied for financial aid should request information from the Financial Aid Office as soon as possible.

3.54.8 Pre-Departure Orientation

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Orientation: One of the best ways to ensure the safety of students and minimize the occurrence of litigation over negligence is for program directors to provide a thorough pre-departure orientation that clearly sets out expectations and consequences. The Office of Internationalization holds a separate mandatory general orientation for all students in each cycle (fall, spring, maymester, and summer). However, program Directors must also organize a separate program-specific orientation. Please work with the Office of Internationalization to provide a quality study abroad orientation.

Program Directors are responsible for scheduling pre-departure orientation sessions in cooperation with the Assistant Director for Education Abroad. Students are required to attend the Saturday OI orientation session provided for all students participating in international programs. At the end of the session, faculty/staff will have an opportunity to meet with their group briefly prior to dismissal. Program Directors should address the following topics in pre-departure meetings (including any others of their own):

  1. Education Abroad Student Pre-Departure Checklist
  2. Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI) insurance for all students and program directors
  3. Emergency contact and medical forms
  4. Medications: Advice to prepare a customized medical kit including prescription medications in labeled bottles, generic prescriptions for refill, and an extra pair of eyeglasses.
  5. Immunizations and visas
  6. Pre- and post-program evaluations
  7. Cross-cultural Issues
  8. Health and safety (including mental health): You may wish to distribute travel health information available from the Centers for Disease Control.
  9. On-site orientation
  • Cautions about alcohol and drug abuse and a warning not to carry, buy, or sell illegal drugs
  • Information about the physiological and psychological consequences of jet lag, culture shock, homesickness, loneliness, changes in diet, lack of exercise, and so on
  • General instructions for emergency medical situations: using an emergency telephone system (like 911) or calling an ambulance, a hospital or doctor, or an embassy or consular office
  • Prudent advice on how to minimize the possibility of being the victim of crime
  • Advice to avoid political activity
  • Region-specific health information such as the nature, prevention, and treatment of region-specific diseases; required and recommended vaccinations; food risks; and descriptions of persistent and epidemic diseases.
  • Retaining copies of the passport information page and Participant Information Form
  • On-site arrangements and services (e.g., housing, meals, ATMs, health care facilities, e-mail access)
  • How to locate routine and emergency professional medical help
  • Facts on local crime and the political situation. You should distribute the State Department’s Travel Advisories and Consular Information Sheets.
  • Retaining copies of the passport information page and Participant Information Form
  • Local vs. U.S. Laws: Students should be advised that they are subject to local–not U.S.–laws and that GGC or the U.S. Embassy can do little to help students who are caught breaking the law, other than visiting the student in jail.
  1. Rules of behavior and penalties (e.g., attendance policy, dress code, behavior expectations, and grounds for expulsion)
  2. Keeping track of troops
  3. It’s still academic!
  4. Airline and travel itinerary
  5. Review of course syllabi, evaluation criteria, and academic expectations (for credit-bearing programs)
  6. Scheduled activities vs. free time; making clear when and where GGC responsibility ends before, during, and after the program
  7. Survival language training for programs in non-English-speaking countries
  8. Information on the culture, history, politics of the country (-ies) or region(s) to be visited

The Office of Internationalization will address the following topics during the mandatory Saturday pre-departure orientation with students:

  1. Before you go (including contact information, finances, passports, and visas)
  2. While you’re there (including accessing your money, health abroad, medications and prescriptions)
  3. Safety
  4. Following host country laws
  5. Social media and education abroad
  6. Pre-departure survey
  7. Recognizing and dealing with culture shock; activities to develop cross-cultural understanding and skills
  8. Policies and procedures
  9. Health and safety
  10. Alcohol and drug use
  11. General travel tips
  12. GGC academic and financial policies (including registration, billing, financial aid, posting grades upon return)
  13. Once you return

3.54.9 Risk and Crisis Management

Reviewed August 4, 2016

No activity is risk free, but study abroad may involve unique risks to participants and a higher level of responsibility for program directors. This section describes how program directors can best protect their students from harm. Any issues regarding legal liability should be addressed to the Office of Legal Affairs (+1-678-407-5919).

3.54.9.1 How to Create A Reasonably Safe Program

Reviewed August 4, 2016

  1. Familiarity with Program and Site: The program director must be thoroughly familiar with the program; providers of services; and the cultural, political, and social conditions of the sites. The program director should investigate the security of all accommodations and the safety record of all transportation providers, research the security of all destinations and the areas through which the group will travel using ground transportation, monitor State Department U.S. Passports and International Travel site for any alerts and warnings. A site visit or planning trip well before the program start date is highly recommended.
  2. Supervision and Back-up: Program directors should make sure that someone is always in charge. An assistant director or in-country coordinator must be available in case the director is unable to function. Students should always be accompanied during group travel by the program director, assistant or co-director, host institution staff, country coordinator, or student leader to handle emergency situations. At least one person on location must be certified in first aid or CPR administration.
  3. No Student Left Behind: Under no circumstances may a student be left behind alone in a foreign country. There must be provision for a program director to be with the student.
  4. Insurance: Students participating on GGC study abroad or service-learning programs must carry the mandatory study abroad insurance (currently Cultural Insurance Services International (CISI). It covers medical expenses, evacuation, family visits, and repatriation of remains. The coverage must be made very clear to students upon application and during orientation. Program directors must include the cost of insurance in the program budget, so funds will be available for the insurance provider. The insurance will be purchased on behalf of the participants by the Office of Internationalization. The program director should also make sure he/she has copies of the Participant Information Forms from all student and faculty participants during the program.
  5. Certification in First Aid Administration: The program director must be certified in first aid (CPR) administration.
  6. Smart Traveller Enrollment Program: The program director should have all program participants sign up for the US Department of State Smart Traveller Enrollment Program.
  7. International Travel Registry: The program director should have all program participants compete and return to OI the International Travel Registry (Appendix D).
  8. Statement of Responsibility: All students who participate in study abroad program must sign an application form that includes a Waiver of Liability for their program. This document will be available in Terra Dotta.
  9. Alcohol Policy: Students are expected to follow the local laws governing the sale and consumption of alcohol in the country where they are studying. They are expected to exercise moderation and responsible conduct if they decide to consume alcohol. In addition, they should take special care to avoid excessive alcohol consumption because it impairs judgment and could possibly alienate members of their host community. Under no circumstances should a GGC faculty or staff member purchase for students or provide students with alcoholic beverages.
  10. Illness/Hospitalization: In case a student is hospitalized, the program director must take all necessary measures to ensure the student does not feel alone or isolated. If possible, and without violating the student’s privacy, the program director should ensure the student is with someone at all times.

3.54.9.2 Crisis Management

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Study abroad may involve unique risks to participants and a higher level of responsibility for supervisors. This policy provides procedures for handling crisis situations abroad. It should be noted that these procedures are mandatory. They are to be followed by ALL program directors in the situations described. PROGRAM DIRECTORS SHOULD REMEMBER TO TAKE THIS DOCUMENT WITH THEM ON THE PROGRAM AND REMEMBER TO DOCUMENT ACTIONS.

All of the crisis management protocols below require that Program Directors contact the Office of Internationalization (OI) as soon as possible.

  1. Log of Events - Program Director: In the event of a crisis or emergency abroad, the program director is required to begin keeping a log of events immediately. It is critical for information to be shared accurately and completely, as soon as possible.
  2. Log of Events - Director of Internationalization: During a crisis or emergency abroad, the Director of Internationalization will keep a log of all calls and activities. In his/her absence, the Assistant Director for Education Abroad will keep the log.
  3. Incident Report Form: In the event of a student incident involving excessive or illegal alcohol consumption, drug use, theft, assault, injury, illness, arrest, a behavior problem, or other serious situations involving a student, the program director will complete the Incident Report Form (Appendix F) and email/text it as soon as possible to the Director of Internationalization. The information will enable the Director of Internationalization to provide any necessary support. If necessary, the Office of Internationalization will provide the incident report to the Dean of Students and/or other College administrators.
  4. Cancellation of Programs: In the event of an emergency (such as civil unrest, a pandemic outbreak, a natural disaster, or the issuance of a travel warning after program approval), it will most likely be necessary to cancel or significantly alter a program for the safety of all program participants. The Director of Internationalization, in consultation with the Overseas Crisis Management Team, will make a recommendation to the Provost to continue or cancel the program.
  5. Emergency Notification System: In the event of an emergency or crisis abroad, the Program Director should contact the Director of Internationalization, who will contact appropriate members of the Overseas Crisis Management Team. If the Program Director cannot reach the Director of Internationalization, s/he should contact the Assistant Director for Education Abroad. If the Assistant Director for EA is unavailable, the call should be directed to the GGC Office of Public Safety at 678-407-5333. This number is answered 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. All known information about the emergency should be given, including contact information for the program director. The Assistant Director for Education Abroad will then contact the Director of Internationalization, who will activate the GGC emergency plan. The Director of Internationalization will determine if circumstances merit contacting the President and the Provost. From this point, only the Director of Internationalization will handle all communication with the program director for the duration of the crisis.
  6. Injury or Death of a Program Director: If a program director is admitted to the hospital while s/he is abroad and there is no other faculty/staff member on the program, the program director should notify the Director of Internationalization immediately, and s/he will activate the GGC emergency plan. If a program director dies while leading a program abroad, any other faculty/staff member on the program should notify the Director of Internationalization, who will activate the GGC emergency plan.
  7. Student Death: If a student dies while s/he is abroad, the program director should gather as much information as possible regarding the cause of death and contact the study abroad program director immediately. The program director should not attempt to contact the family directly. The Director of Internationalization will contact the Dean of Students who will contact the family. The study abroad program director will also consult with GGC’s Counseling and Psychological Services (+1-678.407.5592) to make arrangements for resources for the other program participants. The program director should make sure the student’s belongings are safely stored and notify the rest of the participating students. All circumstances surrounding the death should be kept private until the local police complete an official investigation.
  8. If there is an emergency, the program director should contact persons in the order listed below:
    1. Director, Office of Internationalization (Funwi Ayuninjam)
      • (Int’l Access) +1-678-407-5145 (Office)
      • (Int’l Access) +1-678-407-0292 (U.S. Cell, Office)
      • (Int’l Access) +1-336-712-0827 (U.S. Cell, Personal)
      • If a Title IX incident: Director of Diversity, Institutional Equity, and Title IX Program Administration
      • (Int’l Access) +1-678-407-5921 (Office)
    2. OI Assistant Director, Education Abroad (Cele Blair)
      • (Int’l Access) +1-678-407-5597 (Office)
      • (Int’l Access) +1- 404-406-7870 (Cell Phone)

3.54.10 Summary of Participant Obligations and Responsibilities

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Summary of Student Obligations (Mandatory)

  1. For study abroad: Students ensure that, through their academic advisors or school Points of Contact, they choose the right course of study.
  2. For service learning: Students ensure that, through their advisors or school Points of Contact, they choose the right program.
  3. Students complete, sign, and submit to the Office of Internationalization all required forms, including an application form, a Waiver of Liability, and the pre-departure checklist (see Appendix C) for their program within the published deadlines. Electronic forms must also be duly completed and submitted.
  4. Students submit to the Office of Internationalization all required documents.
  5. Students obtain signatures of approval as part of their study abroad or service learning application and individual advisement process.
  6. Students attend all mandatory pre-departure orientations.
  7. Students sign up for the US Department of State Smart Traveller Enrollment Program.
  8. Students take all recommended travel prophylaxes/shots, and according to the recommended schedule.
  9. Students secure and take with them all required travel documents, including passport, visa, and health card. Failure to do so would result in the student not traveling. GGC is not responsible for ensuring participants have the appropriate travel documents.

Summary of Program Director Responsibilities

  1. The program director participates in all related GGC training sessions, including one offered by the Director of Diversity, Institutional Equity, and Title IX Program Administration.
  2. The program director is certified in first aid (CPR) administration.
  3. The program director has all program participants sign up for the US Department of State Smart Traveller Enrollment Program.
  4. The program director has all students complete and return to OI the International Travel Registry (Appendix D).
  5. The program director verifies that each program participant has checked off all items on the pre-departure checklist (see Appendix C) no later than 2-3 days prior to departure.
  6. If a group flight: The program director verifies that all program participants have the required travel documents once the group assembles at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

3.54.11 Policies and Procedures Pertaining to International Exchange Agreements

Reviewed August 4, 2016

To promote international education at GGC, the College has a network of relationships with partner institutions abroad facilitated by the Office of Internationalization. These exchange relationships encourage students to study abroad, attract international students and faculty members to campus, and enable GGC faculty to teach and conduct collaborative and individual research at institutions abroad. GGC’s desire is to develop and cultivate relationships that support the College’s broad institutional and international mission through creating and maintaining a worldwide set of partners that will be utilized by the campus community. While GGC actively pursues additional international exchange agreements to promote these objectives, such agreements are approached with care. It is more beneficial to support quality programs than to maintain a long list of inactive partnerships.

3.54.11.1 Purpose

Reviewed August 4, 2016

The following describes policies and procedures for developing exchange agreements between any unit at GGC and an institutional partner located outside the United States, regardless of the nature of the exchange. Specifically, these policies will delineate GGC procedures regarding the establishment of international exchange agreements through an examination of guiding considerations, applicability determinants, and clarification of types of agreements. Procedures outlined include the role of the Office of Internationalization, guidelines for drafting an international exchange agreement, and steps for approval and authorization. A checklist and an exchange agreement worksheet are included to facilitate process negotiation and understanding.

3.54.11.2 Procedures and Considerations

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Before developing an exchange agreement, the potential for exchange and program compatibility should be considered in order to establish the feasibility and appropriateness of the desired agreement. The potential for exchange will be determined based on the ability to fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Significant exchange possibilities should exist in at least one of the following areas: student, faculty, or research.
  2. The initiative should have significant support from at least one academic program.
  3. If funding comes initially from external sources, e.g., federal grants, the institutional commitment should continue beyond the life of the grant unless explicitly stated that the relationship is active only during the administration of that grant.
  4. For student exchanges, potential should exist for long-term interest and activity.
  5. A benefit to GGC must be demonstrated.

The compatibility of the proposed exchange agreement with the mission and objectives of GGC will also be scrutinized. To that end, the following requirements should be fulfilled:

  1. If the proposed agreement is in a region or country where GGC already has similar programmatic exchange relationships, there must be a strong rationale for the establishment of the proposed agreement and a demonstrated benefit to the College.
  2. Proposing units/schools/departments at both institutions should possess comparable strengths and should show a strong willingness to sustain an on-going relationship.
  3. The proposed partner institution should offer comparable levels of study.
  4. There should be an expectation that academic credits earned at the host institution will be recognized at the home institution.
  5. Academic calendars of the two institutions should be taken into consideration.
  6. An infrastructure to administer the exchange at the host institution must be identified.

3.54.11.3 Procedures and Applicability

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Whenever any unit of GGC enters into an exchange relationship with a university or other institution located outside the territorial boundaries of the United States of America that involves, or might lead to, commitments of college resources of any kind, GGC must sign a written agreement with the partner institution. Such agreements are referred to as “Exchange Agreements.” These procedures apply to all Memoranda of Understanding (MOU), Faculty Exchange Agreements, and Student Exchange Agreements coordinated at GGC. An exchange relationship should be formalized under an Exchange Agreement if it involves any of the following components:

  1. The assignment of administrative staff, faculty, or student (research assistant or project assistant) support on an ongoing basis
  2. The commitment of institutional funds (from program or school) on an ongoing basis
  3. The exchange of faculty, staff, or students
  4. Extramural funding for research collaborations that presume/require specific institution-to-institution agreements

Exclusions: These procedures are intended to govern Exchange Agreements only. They are not intended to include the following types of arrangements:

  1. Development of projects for assistance and technical assistance related to research
  2. Relationships described and approved in their entirety through another campus agency, e.g., grant-funded projects
  3. Visiting professorships and lectureships, e.g., Fulbright program
  4. Brief visiting lectureships or informal exchanges, e.g., guest departmental lectures even if an honorarium is provided to the visiting speaker
  5. Relationships in which departments/units do not commit more than hospitality or the volunteer efforts of faculty or staff

Questions about the applicability of these procedures to specific proposals or projects that are not exchange agreements should be addressed to the Office of Internationalization (OI).

3.54.11.4 Types of International Agreements

Reviewed August 4, 2016

An International Exchange Agreement is a written document outlining the terms and conditions providing for an exchange of faculty, staff, students, or research activity between GGC and a university or other institution located outside the territorial boundaries of the United States of America.

Exchange Agreements may be negotiated unit to unit, school to school, or in a broad-based institutional capacity. A relationship that stipulates an actual exchange of students, faculty, and/or staff requires a formal Exchange Agreement. A relationship that reflects general collaboration without specific exchange components does not require an Exchange Agreement. Formal Exchange Agreements stipulate the details and implementation procedures for a specific program of exchange or collaboration and may in some cases involve a commitment of resources.

The academic population targeted in the Exchange Agreement determines whether a Student Exchange Agreement or a Faculty Exchange Agreement is appropriate.

  1. A Student Exchange Agreement is an international exchange agreement designed to include a mutual exchange of students between institutions for a term exceeding two years.
  2. A Faculty Exchange Agreement is an international exchange agreement designed to include an exchange of faculty or researchers between institutions for a term exceeding two years.
  3. A Pilot Exchange Agreement usually lasts for two years and allows both institutions to review their involvement before making a more substantial time commitment. In many cases, a Pilot Exchange Agreement will be implemented prior to a long-term Student or Faculty Exchange Agreement.
  4. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) recognizes a shared interest between parties in exploring together potential projects, funding, or other arrangements that may lead to specific projects. No clear projects or plans are delineated. MOUs are preliminary ceremonial documents drafted to reflect or promote good will between the parties and the intention to solidify specific obligations and commitments in an Exchange Agreement at a later date. However, an MOU is still a legally binding contract subject to the same authorization and campus approval procedures as a more specific Exchange Agreement.

Specific Exchange Agreements that implement an actual exchange specify the obligations and commitments of each party. Thus, a well-written, specific Exchange Agreement is always preferable to an MOU, because it reflects a genuine relationship, implements a real collaboration, and tends not to generate unrealistic expectations or misunderstandings between the parties.

3.54.11.5 Role of Internationalization in Formalizing an Exchange Relationship

Reviewed August 4, 2016

The Office of Internationalization (OI) provides consulting, review, and authorization services for any GGC unit seeking to formalize an exchange relationship with an international counterpart. The exchange process is a collaborative effort among various academic entities of GGC, individual faculty and staff, research groups, programs, and schools. Such entities are the engines that drive the establishment of relationships and that support them both intellectually and in terms of sustained interest.

Specifically, OI provides the following assistance regarding the drafting and procurement of international Exchange Agreements:

  1. Consults with academic entities on the establishment and terms of international agreements;
  2. Provides assistance in drafting agreements and in developing negotiation strategies;
  3. Collaborates with the Office of Legal Affairs to assess proposals to protect the proposing unit and the institution from unforeseen financial and administrative consequences; and
  4. As the President’s and Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost’s designee, serves as the main review and approval authority for International Exchange Agreements.

3.54.11.6 Guidelines for Drafting Exchange Agreements

Reviewed August 4, 2016

The issues that must be addressed in every Exchange Agreement and guidelines for their inclusion are these:

  1. Home Institution: The institution providing the exchange students
  2. Host Institution: The institution accepting the exchange students
  3. Parties: The agreement must accurately reflect the parties to be bound by the agreement. The parties should be listed by their official titles.
  4. Exchange Officers: OI is noted as the official representative of GGC when Student Exchange Agreements are involved; however, a college representative or faculty member may also be identified to assist with the administration of the specific exchange. In the role of “exchange officer” OI serves as the first point of contact for the institution in terms of official correspondence, managing quota balances, and compliance with college regulations affecting the exchange. A college representative or “faculty champion” also has a strong relationship with the exchange but does not have final authority to authorize a renewal agreement or a modification to an existing agreement. All proposed agreements and modifications must be approved by OI.
  5. Admission to GGC: Students inbound to GGC must be admitted as exchange students.
  6. Housing: The most common and preferred housing option for exchange students is on-campus housing. Typically exchange students must search for and pay for their own accommodations; however, OI will assist by providing nearby housing options if the exchange student indicates he/she does not intend to live on campus.
  7. Quotas: For student and faculty exchanges, the agreement should provide a specific range or “quota” for the number of participants expected. The agreement should describe the quota in terms of the academic calendar and be qualified with specific language concerning the number of semester-long exchanges involved.
  8. Balance of Quotas: The agreement should specify that the exchange will balance in terms of the number of participants. Even though this is not always possible, each partner institution should aim to host and send an equivalent number of participants each year. Every agreement should include language addressing the mechanism whereby an imbalanced exchange will be brought back into balance. It should be noted that the authorizing college has an obligation to GGC to ensure reciprocity over the term of the agreement.
  9. Duration: Agreements must be of a finite duration. Most agreements are made for a term of five years and pilot agreements for a term of two years.
  10. Degree Status: Generally, exchange visitors do not have the right to earn a degree at the host institution. The agreement should clearly state that participation in the exchange does not in itself entitle the participant to enter a degree program at the host institution. Typically, the visiting exchange students will have the same rights and responsibilities as a regular domestic student.
  11. Conduct: GGC students who participate in international exchange programs are required to agree to comply with all institutional rules, standards, and instructions for student behavior, including but not limited to those set forth in the APM 4.6.5 Student Code of Conduct.
  12. Work Plans: The agreement should address the parties’ expectations concerning the submission of a statement of the participants’ academic plans. Relevant components might include information regarding the individual’s previous background and training for work in a particular field; course work; the individual’s goal while on the exchange; curriculum vitae; and transcripts.
  13. Language Ability: The agreement must state the partnering institutions’ expectations concerning language preparation. In student exchanges, students inbound to GGC must meet minimum language proficiency requirements. Further, if the proposed partner represents an institution where English is not the language of instruction, then it will need to be clearly stated what the language of instruction is and what the expectation of the language proficiency must be.
  14. Tuition: For student exchanges, regular GGC tuition must be paid by one outgoing GGC student to cover the cost of one incoming visitor. The GGC student pays based upon full-time regular tuition and/or registration fees. If the student is a Georgia resident, then he/she will pay in-state tuition, and if the student is not a Georgia resident, he/she will pay out-of-state tuition. GGC tuition paid for one student (regardless of the student’s academic level and tuition category) covers the instruction costs for one international visitor. All student exchanges are based on semester tuition. Special fees must be paid by the student to the host institution.
  15. Access to University Resources: The agreement should describe any rights or limitations presented to participants while at the host institution. In general, “college-wide” agreements limit an exchange student’s access to certain programs and/or classes as would be the case for regular GGC students, including upper-division courses (if the exchange student’s level is equivalent to lower division), and access to courses only when the student has met all prerequisites. An individual entity developing an exchange should not draft an agreement that allows or encourages inbound participants to concentrate on high-demand (or impacted) academic course sequences without the express permission of the GGC school involved.
  16. Limitation of Financial Commitment: Each agreement should include language limiting the institution’s financial commitment to available funding and to the agreement’s specific terms.
  17. Stipends/Salary: If any compensation for participants is involved, such provisions must be stated clearly in the agreement. For faculty exchanges, the responsibility for salary support must be addressed as well as the terms of any additional compensation (such as summer salary, fringe benefits, honoraria, or travel allowance).
  18. Travel: Regardless of whether or not travel is provided as part of the exchange, the question of responsibility for participant travel must be addressed. If any portion of travel (for students or faculty) is to be provided by GGC, the provider must follow normal travel regulations and purchasing guidelines.
  19. Insurance: All participants, including incoming and outgoing students, researchers, and faculty, must have adequate health insurance that will be active while the exchange takes place.

OTHER: In negotiating Exchange Agreements, institutional procedures, policies, or other special considerations that might affect or shape the exchange’s terms should be taken into account. Several of these considerations are presented below:

  1. Immigration Issues: Both incoming and outgoing participants typically need visas issued by the host country in order to participate in an exchange program. Visa application procedures can be detailed and often require significant lead time that might affect application deadlines and scheduling. For participants inbound to GGC, appropriate documentation will be issued. All questions regarding immigration procedures should be directed to the Office of Internationalization (OI) for inbound and outbound students.
  2. Administrative Support: The unit or units developing an Exchange Agreement are responsible for some administrative support necessary to sustain the relationship. Examples of responsibilities include identifying GGC students interested in taking part in the exchange and advising both incoming and outgoing students regarding academic options. OI will provide administrative support in the form of processing applications and providing general assistance, including coordinating information sessions, pre-departure preparation, and assistance in disseminating program literature and documents.
  3. Review: The agreement must address the parties’ plans for reviewing the exchange program at appropriate intervals to assess the extent to which the program has met its academic and fiscal goals, the desirability of continuing the program, and whether amendments are advisable.

3.54.11.7 Authorization and Approval Process

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Exchange Agreements may be initiated by a school or by OI. School-initiated agreements must be approved at the school level before they go to OI, while OI-initiated agreements, which may apply to GGC as a whole, are approved directly by the Provost. School-level exchange agreements must be approved at the school level and authorized by the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost before the President or his/her designee signs them. As described below, agreements must first be approved at the school (or unit) level because of the potential commitment of that unit’s resources. All agreements must then be authorized by the Provost. School-level agreements signed by authorized representatives of GGC and a party or parties abroad represent legally binding contracts. Below are the steps in the approval and authorization process.

  1. School-initiated Agreements
  • The Originating Unit receives a signed letter from the appropriate Dean and completes the Procedural Checklist and Exchange Agreement Worksheet [See below] in preparation for a consultation with OI.
  • OI then assists in the development of a draft agreement. Suggestions will be made regarding interpretation of campus procedures and the most appropriate type of agreement depending on the circumstance. Often, an initial pilot agreement is developed that commits the College to a two-year program, after which it is determined whether or not to continue.
  • After review of the draft agreement, the Originating Unit presents the document to the respective Dean for his/her approval.
  • The Director of OI reviews the agreement on GGC’s behalf and recommends it for signing to the Provost.
  • The Director of OI forwards the agreement to the Office of Legal Affairs for feedback.
  • The Director of OI forwards the agreement to the other partner for review. If they make any modifications, the Director of OI reconciles the language with the Office of Legal Affairs, ensures agreement from the other partner and from the Office of Legal Affairs, and then forwards two originals of the agreement to the President for signing, via the Provost.
  • The Director of OI forwards the two originals to the other party, which returns one signed original to OI for filing.
  1. School-level Agreements
  • The Director of OI explores opportunities for international partnerships and shares them with deans who are likely to be interested in such partnerships. If the overseas curriculum is likely to be of interest to several GGC deans, the Director of OI seeks an opportunity to present it to the deans together.
  • If at least one dean supports the partnership, the Director of OI works with his/her overseas counterpart to draft an agreement.
  • The Director of OI forwards the agreement to the Office of Legal Affairs for feedback.
  • If the Office of Legal Affairs makes any substantive changes to the agreement, the Director of OI ensures concurrence from the other partner, and then forwards two original copies of the agreement to the President, via the Provost.
  • The Director of OI forwards the two originals to the other party, which returns one signed original to OI for filing.

OI will keep signed copies of agreements in a master file and will serve as the repository for all GGC Exchange Agreements.

3.54.11.8 Exchange Agreement Worksheet for School-Initiated Agreements  

3.54.12 Appendices

Reviewed August 4, 2016

Below are forms pertaining to the various programs discussed above. These are only samples. The ones bearing GGC letterheads are available in Terra Dotta and in the Office of Internationalization.

Appendix A - Preliminary Request for Approval  

Appendix B - Detailed Proposal  

Appendix C - Education Abroad Student Pre-Departure Checklist  

Appendix D - International Travel Registry  

Appendix E - Checklist for School-Initiated Agreements  

Appendix F - Education Abroad Student Incident Report Form  

 

3.55 I-Courses

Reviewed May 26, 2016

I-courses are those courses offered by GGC that have been intentionally designed to promote student learning and development in relation to the College’s 2013-2018 Quality Enhancement Plan. These courses are intended to provide students with opportunities to build intercultural competence and skill. As such, i-courses contain both a high level of international content and the requirements and activities needed to promote student success in achieving the desired learning outcomes at an appropriate level for a given course. The QEP Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) address three broad areas of competence: intercultural awareness (SLOs 1 and 2), communication and collaboration (SLOs 3 and 4), and application (SLO 5).

3.55.1 Operational Definition of An I-Course

Reviewed May 26, 2016

A course is considered an i-course if it:

  1. Has a score of three or four on the Content Rubric, indicating that over 30% of the course material is international or global in focus;
  2. Addresses a minimum of two of the QEP SLOs, drawn from two separate SLO categories as determined by the Outcomes Rubric.
    1. Category 1 is Cultural Awareness and includes SLOs 1 & 2,
    2. Category 2 is Communication and Collaboration and includes SLOs 3 & 4, and
    3. Category 3 is Application/Problem Solving and includes SLO 5.
  3. Expects students to demonstrate competence at a developmentally appropriate level, i.e.:
    1. For lower level courses, a minimum of two SLOs (in 2 of 3 categories) must be met at least at the novice level.
    2. For upper level courses, a minimum of two SLOs (in 2 of 3 categories) must be met at least at the developing level.

3.55.2 Verification of A Course as An I-Course

Reviewed May 26, 2016

A course must be verified as an i-course against the operational definition of an i-course above. A faculty member who develops or revises a course either through the Center For Teaching Excellence (CTE) Internationalized Learning Program (ILP) or individually may submit the course to the QEP Assessment Committee for review and verification. Required information and course materials are to be posted on the QEP Portfolio Course Repository for review. The QEP Assessment Committee will review the course once all materials are submitted and notify the submitting faculty member when a decision is made.

 

3.56 Global Studies Certification

Reviewed May 26, 2016

3.56.1 Global Studies Certification Admission Requirements

Reviewed May 26, 2016

To be accepted into the Global Studies Certification Program, a student must:

  1. Possess a 2.7 Cumulative GPA
  2. Have completed 24 hours of academic credit (with at least 12 hours completed at GGC)
  3. Complete/sign the Certification Agreement available in the Office of Internationalization. (This process involves the student, faculty mentor and Certification Coordinator.)

3.56.2 Global Studies Certification Program Completion Policies

Reviewed December 1, 2016

To complete the Global Studies Certification program, a student must:

  1. Complete at least six (6) hours in i-courses at the 3000 or 4000 level at GGC with a grade of “C” or better. NOTE: Students who took a course in 2012-13 through 2015-16 that is subsequently identified as an i-course may submit a request for the course to fulfill this requirement. The Certification Coordinator will verify whether the course qualifies as an i-course and respond to the student’s request.
  2. Complete the Global Studies Certification Capstone Course with at a grade of “C” or better. NOTE: Capstone Course Registration: Pre-registration for the Certification Capstone Course signals the completion of all other certification requirements.
  3. Complete a credit-bearing study abroad program, or a course offered in an international location, earning a grade of “C” or better and a minimum of 3-credit hours for the experience.
  4. Satisfy the foreign language requirement by demonstrating proficiency in at least one language other than the student’s native language. The foreign language requirement for the Global Studies Certification can be satisfied in any one of the following manners:
  • Two Courses at GGC: Completes two GGC courses at any level (in the same language) in Chinese, French or Spanish with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transfer Courses in Foreign Languages: Transfers into GGC with two courses at any level (in the same foreign language) in any USG recognized modern foreign language with a grade of “C” or better.
  • AP or IB Credit: Completes Advanced Placement (AP) or IB examinations and scores at the recommended score/level, he/she will receive academic credit in those circumstances and subsequently satisfy the Certification’s proficiency requirement.
  • CLEP Testing: Completes CLEP testing for a foreign language and scores at the recommended score/level to receive academic credit.
  • Language Testing International Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) or Writing Proficiency Test (WPT): Completes LTI testing and scores at the recommended level to test out of the GGC language requirement without credit. 

3.56.3 Global Studies Certification Language Proficiency

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The following reference charts provide additional descriptive factors regarding the range of proficiency standards to satisfy the foreign language requirement of the Global Studies Certification:

Language Category Based on Difficulty Class A:Western European Languages (Spanish, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Dutch, etc.) Class B: Other World Languages (Asian languages, Middle Eastern languages, Creole, indigenous languages of Africa and the Americas, Eastern European languages, etc.
Expected Proficiency Levels (See the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines) Intermediate Low (Reading, Writing, or Speaking) Novice Mid (Reading, Writing, or Speaking)
Satisfaction of Requirement With Foreign Language Credit Satisfaction of Requirement With Foreign Language Credit Satisfaction of Requirement With Foreign Language Credit
College Coursework 2 semesters in the same language, completed with a “C” or better1 2 semesters in the same language, completed with a “C” or better1
CLEP Score 50 (Spanish, French, and German)2 N/A
AP Scores 3, 4, or 5 (Spanish, French, ) 3, 4, or 5 (Chinese )
AP Scores 4 or 5 (Italian and German2) 4 or 5 (Japanese)
IB Scores HL 4/SL 5 (Spanish, French, and German) HL 4/SL 5 (Arabic and Chinese)

 

Language Category Based on Difficulty Class A:Western European Languages (Spanish, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Dutch, etc.) Class B: Other World Languages (Asian languages, Middle Eastern languages, Creole, indigenous languages of Africa and the Americas, Eastern European languages, etc.
Satisfaction of Requirement Without College Foreign Language Credit Satisfaction of Requirement Without College Foreign Language Credit Satisfaction of Requirement Without College Foreign Language Credit
Language Testing International Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) or Writing Proficiency Test (WPT) Intermediate Low Novice Mid
  1. Any level, need not be consecutive
  2. Credit in German is currently not awarded through the CLEP, although students are allowed to transfer in credit in German.
 

3.57 Demonstration of English/Reading Competency and Regents’ Writing Competency

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College has established standards and criteria for demonstrating competency in writing and in reading. Students with transfer credit for English 1101 and/or English 1102 will meet the criteria for demonstrating competency. Students’ records will be updated to show satisfaction of English/Reading Competency and Regent Writing Competency upon receiving transfer credit for English 1101 or 1102 (with a grade of C or better) or completion of English 1101 or 1102 at Georgia Gwinnett College (with a grade of C or better).

 

3.60 Georgia Gwinnett College Library Collection Development Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

3.60.1 Policy Overview

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose and Mission Statements

The purpose of this policy is to define the guidelines and procedures followed in building and maintaining the collections of the Georgia Gwinnett College Library. An important mission of the Georgia Gwinnett College Library is to create an up-to-date collection consistent with the curricular, instructional, and informational needs of the Georgia Gwinnett College community. This document provides an overview of selection criteria and policy. Specific guidelines for collection development in academic disciplines are contained in separate collection development policies. This policy is reviewed on a regular basis; as the needs of Georgia Gwinnett College change, this policy will change to meet those needs.

Georgia Gwinnett Library Mission Statement:

The mission of the Georgia Gwinnett College Library is to serve the information and research needs of the students, faculty, and staff of Georgia Gwinnett College, a four year unit of the University System of Georgia. The library also provides resources and services for the partners of the former Gwinnett University Center, Georgia Perimeter College and the University of Georgia, and serves as a resource center for the Gwinnett county community.

Georgia Gwinnett College Mission Statement:

Georgia Gwinnett College provides access to targeted baccalaureate level degrees that meet the economic development needs of the growing and diverse population of the northeast Atlanta metropolitan region. It emphasizes the innovative use of technology and active-learning environments to provide its students enhanced learning experiences, practical opportunities to apply knowledge, increased scheduling flexibility, and a variety of course delivery options. Georgia Gwinnett’s outstanding faculty and staff actively engage students in various learning environments, serve as mentors and advisors, and assist students through programs designed to enhance their academic, social, and personal development. GGC produces contributing citizens and future leaders for Georgia and the nation. Its graduates are inspired to contribute to the local, state, national, and international communities and are prepared to anticipate and respond effectively to an uncertain and changing world.

Users

The Georgia Gwinnett College library, located in Lawrenceville, Georgia, serves a wide variety of users. Primary users are the students, faculty, and staff of Georgia Gwinnett College who are involved in the teaching, research and service functions of the university. Library collections are developed and managed with the needs of Georgia Gwinnett College primary users in mind. Secondary clientele are those individuals or institutions that hold some affiliation with GGC. This group includes members of the University System of Georgia, as well as individuals holding valid Gwinnett County Public library cards. All of these users have certain borrowing privileges, but collections are not developed specifically for their needs.

History of the Georgia Gwinnett College Library

Georgia Gwinnett College opened its doors on August 18, 2006. It is the nation’s first four-year public college created in the 21st century, and the first four-year public college created in Georgia in more than 100 years. The new institution was built upon the work of the Gwinnett University Center (GUC) which was established in 1997 to provide University System of Georgia (USG) coordination in Gwinnett County with Georgia Perimeter College (GPC), which offered associate degrees, and with the University of Georgia (UGA), which offered some bachelor’s and graduate programs. In 2002, GUC opened its doors to more than 5,000 students enrolled in the partnership institutions - nine months earlier than projected and reaching the original five-year enrollment projection on opening day. In August of 2002, a $22 million signature building was completed, adding 100,000 square feet with18 state-of-the-art classrooms, a two-story library, and faculty offices. Soon, both Southern Polytechnic State University and The Medical College of Georgia began offering classes on the campus. The Gwinnett University Center Library served to support the work of students and instructors from all of the member institutions. In 2004, the Board of Regents (BOR) voted to create a new four-year state college in Gwinnett County. The County had doubled its population each of the past three decades, and was now home to nearly 700,000 people. With more than 8,000 enrolled students, the GUC was the ninth largest University System institution. On August 18, 2006 Georgia Gwinnett College opened with 120 juniors as its first students. The College’s first freshman class joined GGC in the fall of 2007. GGC currently serves over 8,000 students and the library supports eleven different degree programs and thirty-nine concentrations. The Georgia Gwinnett College library collection has evolved in concert with the growth of academic programs as well as the needs of a constantly increasing patron base. This policy serves to define the guidelines and procedures followed in building and maintaining a collection that will support the students, faculty and programs of the Georgia Gwinnett College community.

Objectives of the Collection Development Process

  • Provide a justification for structuring the collection.
  • Provide a justification for structuring the Materials budget.
  • Establish a consistent methodology for ensuring that all academic programs receive new and necessary materials.
  • Insure that due and proper consideration is given every request for materials.
  • Allow for the consideration as to how individual purchases serve the collection overall.
  • Allow for consideration as to how individual purchases support the curriculum.
  • Insure that the materials budget is spent wisely and following the planned allocation.
  • Allow for the orderly selection, receipt and processing of all materials.
  • Provide a framework for all parties involved in, or affected by, the collection development process.

3.60.2 Responsibility for Collection Development

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Ultimate responsibility for the selection, acquisition, and disposition of library materials rests with the Georgia Gwinnett College Library Director. Under the Director’s guidance, the day to day operations of the Collection Development area are managed by the Head of Collections. The Head of Collections is responsible for managing funds allocated for purchase of library materials and for the internal distribution of such funds. The Head of Collections is also responsible for determining what is purchased with library funds, based on need, appropriateness and financial considerations.

The building of an outstanding library collection is the joint responsibility of the professional library staff and the faculty. Collection development efforts should be made objectively, consistently, and with a systematic approach. Selection of materials is a cooperative procedure involving librarians and teaching faculty. Faculty requests for materials in support of courses taught will have priority, but faculty will also be urged to recommend purchases which will develop all areas of their discipline.

While faculty recommendations are welcomed and faculty help is solicited, the Georgia Gwinnett College Library faculty has the primary responsibility for selecting materials in academic and other areas not specifically represented in the curriculum. It is also the responsibility of the library staff to develop a well-balanced collection. Students are encouraged to submit requests, which will be given serious consideration if material requested meets the guidelines of this policy statement.

3.60.3 Selection Criteria

Reviewed May 26, 2016

3.60.3.1 Scope

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The scope of the collection is intended to:

  • support the academic and curricular needs of the College by collecting materials in a variety of formats and making them available for use;
  • provide a balanced collection in all fields of knowledge relevant to the educational mission of the College; and,
  • offer items of general educational and cultural enrichment which encourage the intellectual growth of students

Although the primary purpose of the Library is to support the curricular needs of the College, the Library is also responsive to the research needs of faculty and administrators. Material needed for this purpose may be purchased if it is considered to be of general and continuing interest. Otherwise, every effort will be made to obtain it through Interlibrary Loan or to identify relevant resources in area libraries and information centers. Scholarly works falling outside our collection areas, published or unpublished dissertations or materials of limited interest will not generally be purchased.

3.60.3.2 Relevance and Appropriateness

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The following criteria are applied to relevance and appropriateness for materials added to the library collection:

  • contribute to the instructional objectives of the College’s educational programs;
  • permanence or timeliness of the material;
  • accuracy of the material;
  • authoritativeness of the material or author;
  • reputation of the publisher or producer; and
  • duplication of information already in the collection.

3.60.3.3 Format

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The format of library materials is integral to their use by patrons, and furthermore their use to the collection as a whole. We recognize that as academic and institutional needs change and technology advances, the library will need to adapt to reflect those changes. The Georgia Gwinnett College Library will acquire information in the format that best serves the need of the college community. For information regarding the acquisition of electronic resources, please see the Electronic Resources Collection Development Policy. Materials requiring specific equipment for use will not be purchased unless the Library has the equipment necessary to make the material available for users.

3.60.3.4 Language

Reviewed May 26, 2016

English language publications are preferred for acquisition, however these exceptions apply:

  • Books that are primarily pictorial in content may be purchased without language restrictions.
  • Faculty requests for material in a specific language meant to support students studying the language.
  • Foreign language materials may be purchased in other subject areas if they are requested by students and/or faculty to support a specific instructional need.

3.60.3.5 Categories of Materials Not Acquired or Selectively Acquired

Reviewed May 26, 2016

In general, the library does not acquire the following materials:

  • Textbooks: The library does not automatically purchase textbooks unless a faculty request is received. If the library purchases textbooks, they are placed in the reference area within the collection. Selected textbooks may be purchased if they are considered a standard work in one of our program areas.
  • Videotape: Videotaped material is not routinely purchased
  • Filmstrips: The library does not purchase filmstrips.
  • 16 MM films: the Library due to financial, preservation and maintenance concerns does not purchase 16mm Films.
  • Microform or Microfiche.

3.60.3.6 General Selection Guidelines To Consider

Reviewed May 26, 2016

When lack of funds limit acquisitions, current publications and instructional value will be given priority over older out-of-print materials and essential materials directly supporting GGC courses will be given priority over research and general information materials.

Interlibrary loan or resource sharing, particularly for subjects that fall outside of a GGC program area, is considered an appropriate option to purchasing. Demand, instructional value, relevance, and cost are factors used in determining whether or not an item is ordered for purchase.

When available, hardcover editions of books will be procured in preference to paperback editions, unless cost or item specific considerations justify acquisition of the paperback edition.

3.60.3.7 Levels of Collection Development For Specific Programs

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Specifics as to levels of collecting intensity and density are reflected in each subject collection development policy.

3.60.3.8 Gifts

Reviewed May 26, 2016

All gifts of print and non-print materials to the Georgia Gwinnett College Library are accepted with the understanding that they are added after they have met the same criteria as materials which are specifically purchased for the collection. The GGCL will not accept gifts with conditions as to their disposition or location. The library retains the right to dispose of any unneeded materials regardless of how they are acquired.

The GGCL will acknowledge but cannot legally appraise gifts for tax purposes. Any appraisal for income tax purposes of a gift of books or other materials to the GGCL is the responsibility of the donor.

3.60.4 Collection Maintenance

Reviewed May 26, 2016

3.60.4.1 De-Selection

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The library recognizes the need to continually evaluate its collection in response to the changing nature and needs of the college curriculum through the de-selection, replacement, and repair of its titles.

De-selection is a necessary component of selection since it systematically provides the following results:

  1. Gives the library a reputation for reliability
  2. Gives the library a fresh, inviting appearance
  3. Creates a collection which is up-to-date
  4. Identifies books which need repairing, rebinding, or replacing
  5. Gives the best library service through a collection of quality

A unique set of withdrawal criteria is used for each type of library material and is listed later in this section. The following criteria are considered in deselecting materials from the collection:

  1. Poor physical condition; not suitable for rebinding
  2. Obsolescence of information
  3. Replacement by later edition
  4. Duplicate copies of a title no longer in demand
  5. Lack of space for materials
  6. Insufficient use
  7. Materials determined as missing
  8. Broken files of un-indexed journals/microfilm

General Collection. All superseded editions of the General Collection become candidates for withdrawal. Decisions to withdraw are made by the Head of Collections on a title-by-title basis.

All damaged, lost, and long overdue General Collection titles become candidates for withdrawal. Decisions to withdraw or replace are made on a title-by-title basis by the Head of Collections.

Reference Materials. The Collection Development Department has established specific withdrawal policies for many of the reference titles for which revised or superseded editions are regularly received. Decisions to withdraw other titles are made by the Head of Collections in consultation with the Coordinator of Research Services and the Library Director.

Serial and Standing Orders. Each year the Head of Collections will review the serial holdings and evaluate titles that are used infrequently. The Head of Collections will work with the Faculty to recommend titles for retention, addition or cancellation. These recommendations are based on a title’s value to the curriculum and budgetary considerations.

Non-print Materials. All damaged non-print materials become candidates for withdrawal. Decisions to withdraw or replace are made on a case-by-case basis by the Head of Collections.

3.60.4.2 Replacements

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Resources that are missing, lost or withdrawn because of wear will not automatically be replaced.

The librarian must consider the merit of item before replacement copies are authorized.

The following criteria are used when making decisions on replacements:

  1. The continued value of the particular title.
  2. The demand for the specific title
  3. The number of copies help
  4. Existing coverage of the subject
  5. The availability of newer or better materials on the subject
  6. Price of the replacement copy

3.60.4.3 Binding

Reviewed May 26, 2016

GGC Library does not bind materials.

3.60.4.4 Duplication

Reviewed May 26, 2016

More than one copy of a title may sometimes be required to meet special needs of the instruction program. While not encouraged because of budget restrictions, purchase of duplicate copies may occur in accordance with the following guidelines:

  1. Print Materials
  1. Multiple demand and heavy continual use of individual titles
  2. Reference titles that are in heavy demand
  3. Specific faculty requests
  1. Non-Print Materials
  1. Multiple demand and heavy continual use of individual titles
  2. Non-print is needed in a different format
  3. Specific faculty requests

3.60.5 Academic Programs

Reviewed May 26, 2016

3.60.5.1 Biology Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting the curricular and instructional needs of the Biology program at GGC.

Categories of concentration in the Biology Program are: General Biology, Cell Biology and Biotechnology, Biochemistry, Biology Teacher Track.

Material selected for Biology will overlap with that selected for other areas, e.g., Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology, Nursing, Social Work, Math, General Science, Chemistry, Physics, Technology and Education.

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of Biology:

Botany Medical Entomology
Zoology Environmental Toxicology
Mycology Biochemistry
Microbiology Genetics
Evolution Bioinformatics
Conservation Biology Limnology
Terrestrial Ecology Human Anatomy, Physiology and Histology
Biotechnology Neurobiology
Virology Industrial Microbiology
Developmental Biology Enzymology
Immunology Life Sciences
Ecology Pharmacology
Science Education Biology Education

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Languages: English is the primary language of collection emphasis.
  2. Treatment of Subject: Biography and general interest material will be selectively purchased. The emphasis is on building and maintaining a strong undergraduate collection. Although the collection covers all aspects of the biological sciences, current collecting emphasizes neuroscience, microbiology and immunology, biochemistry, bioinformatics, evolutionary and developmental biology, cellular and molecular biology, physiology and genetics. Items on individual species, viruses, and organisms applicable to the research of the department will also be collected selectively.
  3. Types of Materials: Selection will include monographs and periodicals, encyclopedias, dictionaries, proceedings/transactions of conferences/congresses/ symposia, and data collections. Collection of media formats such as videos, DVDs, computer software, etc. will be considered at the specific request of the faculty.
  4. Date of Publication: Primarily current imprints will be selected. Some retrospective acquisition of classic or standard works not already in the collection.

3.60.5.2 Business Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting the curricular and instructional needs of the Business program at GGC.

Categories of concentration in the Business Program are:

Accounting, Finance, General Business, International Business, Leadership, and Management Information Systems, and Marketing

Material selected for Business program will overlap with that selected for other areas, e.g., Technology, Psychology, Sociology, Math, General Science, Chemistry, and Education.

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of Business:

Statistics Management Information Systems
Global Business Finance
Marketing Management
Human Resources Corporate Social Responsibility
Organizational Behavior Operations and Project Management
Business Statistics Accounting and Reporting
Network Design International Finance
Macroeconomics Microeconomics
Business Communications Consumer Behavior

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Languages: English will be the primary language of the collection.
  2. Chronological Guidelines: The major emphasis is on the twenty-first century, but classical works about business in earlier periods will be considered to fill in gaps in the collection. Current and recent topics are of major interest, though historical materials are of some interest.
  3. Geographical Guidelines: While primary focus is on the United States, material is acquired to fulfill international topics as well.
  4. Treatment of Subject: Business histories, biographies of major business figures, and well-written popular works will be acquired. Classic and seminal titles in this field will be acquired selectively.
  5. Types of Materials: Most materials acquired will be in the form of books and periodicals and will include, in addition to monographs and serial publications, encyclopedias, dictionaries, atlases, directories, proceedings of conferences and congresses, transactions and reports of societies, statistical publications of the United States government, the United Nations, and statistical yearbooks from other countries.
  6. Case studies will be acquired selectively. Audio-visual materials as well as CD-ROM products and interactive video will be acquired when needed
Program Subdisciplines

Accounting

Financial Reporting
Auditing
Taxes
Management
Accounting Theory
Forensic Accounting
Finance Financial Management
International Finance
Investment And Stocks
Acquisitions
Budget Analysis
Financial Analysis
General Business Entrepreneur
Management
International Business Global Economy
Multicultural Business
Leadership Teams
Organizational Changes
Motivation
Creativity
Decision Making
Management Information Systems Technology In Business
Information Systems
Intelligent Systems Technology
Project And Operations Management
It Planning And Management
Application Systems Management
Data Management
Marketing Consumer Behavior
Market Research
International Marketing

3.60.5.3 Criminal Justice/Criminology Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting the curricular and instructional needs of the Criminal Justice/Criminology Program at GGC including the Program for Minor in Criminal Justice/Criminology.

Categories of concentration in the Criminal Justice/Criminology Program are:

Criminal Justice
Criminology
Liberal Arts

Material selected for Criminal Justice/Criminology Program will overlap with that selected for other areas, e.g., Technology, Psychology, Sociology, Math, History, Political Science and Education.

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of Criminal Justice/Criminology:

The Judicial System Comparative Crim. Justice Systems
American Police Systems Community Based Corrections
Corrections Criminal Law
Criminal Procedures Ethics
Criminal Justice Administration State and Local Government
Juvenile Justice Criminal and Deviant Behavior
White Collar & Cybercrime Victimology
Homeland Security and Terrorism Statistics for Social Sciences
Police and the Community  

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Languages: English will be the primary language of the collection.
  2. Chronological Guidelines: Historical, recent and current publication coverage is necessary for this collection. This collection will need to be updated on a regular basis due to the changing nature of the areas of study and their role in the national and international scheme.
  3. Geographical Guidelines: While primary focus is on the United States, there are secondary focuses on the international influence on human and institutional behaviors as well as the global social and political aspects of the programs.
  4. Treatment of Subject: Historical development of criminal justice and criminology, key theories and case studies, and well-written popular works will be acquired. Some emphasis on techniques and research methods involving the use of statistics, mathematical models, and computer applications is required. Classic and seminal titles in this field will be acquired selectively.
  5. Types of Materials: Most materials acquired will be in the form of books and periodicals and will include, in addition to monographs and serial publications, proceedings of conferences and congresses, statistical publications of the United States government, the United Nations, and statistical yearbooks from other countries.
  6. Audio-visual materials such as DVDs will be acquired upon faculty request.

3.60.5.4 Education Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting the curricular and instructional needs of the Education Program at GGC.

Categories of concentration in the Education Program are:

Early Childhood Education
Special Education
Teacher Certification Tracks
Subject Areas for Teacher Tracts are Biology, English, History, Mathematics, and Political Science.

Material selected for Education Program will overlap with that selected for other areas, e.g., Biology, Technology, Psychology, Sociology, Math, History, Political Science and English.

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the general subdisciplines of Education:

Critical/Contemporary Issues in Education Socio-Cultural Perspectives in Diversity
Teaching Exceptional Learners English Content Methods
Assessment Instructional Adaptation/Design
Leadership Models of Teaching and Learning
Opening of School Experience Characteristics of the Learner
Instructional Foundations  

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of Special Education:

Literacy, Language and Culture Characteristics of Learners w/Exceptionalities
Literacy Foundations Instructional Design/Delivery in Spec. Ed
Literacy Assessment Instructional Assessment/Adaptation in Spec Ed
Literacy Integration Instruction Foundations in Special Ed

These next sections are here if you want to clarify; however, basically covered by the section above “Material selected for Education Program will overlap…”

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of certification track material in Biology:

Botany Anatomy and Physiology
Zoology Evolution
Genetics Microbiology Biochemistry
Cell Biology Ecology Interdisciplinary Science Biotechnology

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of certification track material in English:

Language and Linguistics Modern Poetry and Drama
Ancient Literature to 1500 American Realism and Naturalism
Renaissance Literature Advanced Composition
Long Romantic Period  

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of certification track material in History:

America to 1789 The Atlantic World
America since 1945 History of the Middle East and India
History of Georgia History of China and Japan
Europe since 1789 Greece and the Ancient Near East
Ancient and Medieval Science Medieval Life, Religion and Thought

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of certification track material in Mathematics:

Discrete Mathematics Abstract Algebra I Abstract Algebra I
Geometry Real Analysis II
Probability and Statistics Differential Equations
Abstract Algebra Mathematical Modeling
History of Mathematics  

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of certification track material in Political Science:

Comparative Politics Georgia Politics
Internationals Relations Congress
Modern Political Thought The Presidency
US Foreign Policy America Since 1945

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Languages: English will be the primary language of the collection.
  2. Chronological Guidelines: Historical, recent and current publication coverage is necessary for this collection. This collection will need to be updated on a regular basis due to the changing nature of the areas of study.
  3. Geographical Guidelines: The primary focus of this collection is on the education system in the United States, however, the inclusion of multiculturalism into the school curriculum may require the inclusion of additional appropriate materials.
  4. Treatment of Subject: Historical development of education, key theories and case studies, and well-written popular works will be acquired. The tracks for Teacher Certification will require materials specifically selected for each appropriate area of concentration with the inclusion of instruction based material as well as age appropriate material. Some emphasis on techniques and research methods involving the use of statistics, mathematical models, and computer applications is required. Periodicals are emphasized and selected upon faculty request
  5. Types of Materials: Selection will include monographs and periodicals, encyclopedias, dictionaries, compendia, treatises, proceedings/transactions of conference/congresses/symposia, and data collections. Periodicals are of primary importance. Audio-visual materials as well as CD-ROM products and interactive video will be acquired when needed.

3.60.5.5 English Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting the curricular and instructional needs of the English program at GGC.

Categories of concentration in the English Program are:

English Language and Literature, English Writing and Rhetoric, English Interdisciplinary Studies, and Teacher Certification

Material selected for English will overlap with that selected for other areas, e.g., History, Film, Religion, Education, Journalism, Business, Politics, Psychology, Digital Media, and Education.

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of English:

American Literature British Literature
World Literature Writing for Media/Web
Creative Writing Composition
Technical Writing Logic
Reason Communications
Poetry Drama
Linguistics English Education

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Languages: English is the primary language of collection emphasis.
  2. Treatment of Subject: Biography and general interest material will be selectively purchased. The emphasis is on building and maintaining a strong undergraduate collection. Although the collection covers all geographic and chronological areas of Literature, current collecting emphasizes Anglo-American Literature, Composition, and Rhetoric.
  3. Types of Materials: Selection will include monographs and periodicals, encyclopedias, dictionaries, proceedings/transactions of conferences/congresses/ symposia, and data collections. Collection of media formats such as videos, DVDs, computer software, etc. will be considered at the specific request of the faculty.
  4. Date of Publication: Primarily current imprints will be selected. Classic or standard works will be acquired selectively.
  5. Chronological Guidelines: Items will be selected to ensure coverage of all the major time periods.
  6. Geographical Guidelines: Items will be selected to ensure coverage of all geographical are

3.60.5.6 Exercise Science Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting curricular and instructional needs of the Exercise Science Program at GGC.

Material selected for Exercise Science Program will overlap with that selected for other areas of study including but not limited to: Biology, Sociology, Math, Science, Nursing, Physics, and Anatomy.

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of Exercise Science:

Kinesiology Biology
Exercise Physiology  
Psychosocial Health and Wellness Human Motor Learning/Control
Exercise Testing and Prescription Physical Dimensions of Aging
Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Injuries Anatomy and Physiology
Fitness Assessment/Emergency Health CareCell Worksite Health Promotion

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Language: The primary language of the collection is English.
  2. Chronological Guidelines: The primary emphasis is on current materials.
  3. Geographical Guidelines: The major focus is on material related to the United States.
  4. Treatment of Subject: A strong undergraduate collection is the main focus. There is a strong emphasis on techniques of physical therapy. Works on the medical or biological aspects of exercise science will be included. Textbooks will be restricted.
  5. Types of Materials: Materials will primarily be acquired in the form of monographs. In addition to monographs, reference works such as encyclopedias and dictionaries of medicine, handbooks, abstracts, and indexes of exercise science may be necessary. Collection of media formats such as DVDs and computer software will be considered upon faculty request.
  6. Date of Publication: Emphasis is on materials published since 1995. Retrospective purchasing will be selective and will mainly include undergraduate medical standards.

3.60.5.7 History Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting the curricular and instructional needs of the History program at GGC.

Categories of concentration in the History Program are:

American History, History: Interdisciplinary Studies, Western Civilization, World History, and Teacher Certification

Material selected for History will overlap with that selected for other areas, e.g., Anthropology, Geography, Sociology, Politics, Economics, Literature, Film, Religion, General Science, and Education.

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of History:

American European
Asian African
South American Central American
Ancient Middle Eastern
Social/Cultural Political
Economic Foreign Policy
History Education  

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Languages: English is the primary language of collection emphasis.
  2. Treatment of Subject: Biography and general interest material will be selectively purchased. The emphasis is on building and maintaining a strong undergraduate collection. Although the collection covers all geographic and chronological areas of History, current collecting emphasizes U.S. History, Western Civilization, and World History.
  3. Types of Materials: Selection will include monographs and periodicals, encyclopedias, dictionaries, proceedings/transactions of conferences/congresses/ symposia, and data collections. Collection of media formats such as videos, DVDs, computer software, etc. will be considered at the specific request of the faculty.
  4. Date of Publication: Primarily current imprints will be selected. Classic or standard works will be acquired selectively.
  5. Chronological Guidelines: Items will be selected to ensure coverage of all the major time periods with an emphasis on U.S. History and Western Civilization.
  6. Geographical Guidelines: Items will be selected to ensure coverage of all geographical areas, with an emphasis on North America.

3.60.5.8 Information Technology Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting the curricular and instructional needs of the Information Technology program at GGC including the Program for a Minor in Information Technology.

Categories of concentration in the Information Technology Program are:

Business
Systems and Security
Software Development

Material selected for Information Technology will overlap with that selected for other areas, e.g., Business, Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, Math, General Science, Chemistry, and Education.

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of Information Technology:

Information Security Computer Graphics and Multimedia
Operating Systems Analysis and Design Networks
Web Development Databases
Human/Computer Interaction Programming
Ecommerce Embedded Systems
Computer Games User Centered Design
Software Development Artificial Intelligence
Software Testing and Q&A Computer Gaming Software Development

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Languages: English is the primary language of the collection.
  2. Treatment of Subject: A strong undergraduate collection is the main focus. Biography and general interest material will be selectively purchased. Upper division and research level materials will be considered at the specific request of the faculty.
  3. Types of Materials: Selection will include monographs and periodicals, proceedings/transactions of conference/congresses/symposia, and data collections. Audio-visual materials including CD-ROM products and DVDs will be considered upon request.
  4. Date of Publication: Regularly updating this collection with current publications is paramount. Some retrospective acquisition of classic or standards works not already in the collection may be required.

3.60.5.9 Math Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting the curricular and instructional needs of the Math program at GGC.

Categories of concentration in the Math Program are:

Applied Mathematics, Pure Mathematics, and Teacher Certification

Material selected for Math will overlap with that selected for other areas, e.g., Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Information Technology, Research Methods, and Education.

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of Math:

Abstract Algebra Linear Algebra
Differential Equations Mathematical Modeling
Applied Mathematics Probability & Statistics
Topology Discrete Mathematics
Geometry Real Analysis
Number Theory Logic
Math Education  

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Languages: English is the primary language of collection emphasis.
  2. Treatment of Subject: Biography and general interest material will be selectively purchased. The emphasis is on building and maintaining a strong undergraduate collection. Although the collection covers all aspects of the mathematical sciences, current collecting emphasizes basics of analysis and algebra, topology, number theory, logic, numerical analysis, dynamic systems and differential equations.
  3. Types of Materials: Selection will include monographs and periodicals, encyclopedias, dictionaries, proceedings/transactions of conferences/congresses/ symposia, and data collections. Collection of media formats such as videos, DVDs, computer software, etc. will be considered at the specific request of the faculty.
  4. Date of Publication: Primarily current imprints will be selected. Classic or standard works will be acquired selectively.
  5. Chronological Guidelines: The major emphasis is on the twenty-first century, but classical works about mathematics in earlier periods will be considered to fill in gaps in the collection. Current and recent topics are of major interest, though historical materials are of some interest.
  6. Geographical Guidelines: There are no geographical limitations on this collection.

3.60.5.10 Political Science Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting the curricular and instructional needs of the Political Science program at GGC.

Categories of concentration in the Political Science Program are:

American Government, Comparative Politics, International Relations, Legal Studies, and Teacher Certification

Material selected for Political Science will overlap with that selected for other areas, e.g., History, English, Business, Economics, and Education.

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of Political Science:

American Government Comparative Politics
International Relations Political Theory
Public Policy Georgia Government
Foreign Policy Legal Systems
International Development International Law
Conflict Resolution  
Political Science Education  

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Languages: English is the primary language of collection emphasis.
  2. Treatment of Subject: Biography and general interest material will be selectively purchased. The emphasis is on building and maintaining a strong undergraduate collection.
  3. Types of Materials: Selection will include monographs and periodicals, encyclopedias, dictionaries, proceedings/transactions of conferences/congresses/ symposia, and data collections. Collection of media formats such as videos, DVDs, computer software, etc. will be considered at the specific request of the faculty.
  4. Date of Publication: Primarily current imprints will be selected. Classic or standard works will be acquired selectively.
  5. Chronological Guidelines: The major emphasis is on the twenty-first century, but classical works about political science in earlier periods will be considered to fill in gaps in the collection. Current and recent topics are of major interest, though historical materials are of some interest.
  6. Geographical Guidelines: While the primary focus is on the United States, there are no geographical limitations on this collection.

3.60.5.11 Psychology Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting curricular and instructional needs of the Psychology Program at GGC.

Categories of concentration in the Psychology Program are:

Clinical/Personality
Cognitive/Neuroscience
Developmental/Educational
Social/Applied

Material selected for Psychology will overlap with that selected for other departments, e.g., Anthropology, Biology, Sociology, Communications, Nursing, Social Work, Business/Marketing and Education.

CGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of psychology:

Clinical Psychology Abnormal Psychology
Cognitive Neuroscience Developmental Psychology
Comparative Psychology Sports Psychology
Psychopharmacology Social and Applied Psychology
Psychopathology Forensic Psychology Human Diversity
Community Health, Assessment and Planning Health Psychology
Psychotherapy Cognitive Psychology Human Sexuality
Behavioral Neuroscience Industrial/Organizational Psychology
Biological Psychology  
Educational Psychology  

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Language: The primary language of the collection is English.
  2. Chronological Guidelines: The primary emphasis is on current materials. Some retrospective acquisition of classic or standards works not already in the collection will be considered.
  3. Geographical Guidelines: The major focus is on material related to the United States; however, this focus does include cross-cultural psychology. Interest is also placed on scholarly materials that are international and multi-cultural in scope.
  4. Treatment of Subject: Biographies of psychologists will be collected selectively. History of psychology will be collected broadly. There is a strong emphasis on techniques and research methods involving the use of statistics, mathematical models, and computer applications. Works on the medical or biological aspects of psychology, including psychiatry will be acquired selectively. Textbooks and works written on a popular level will be restricted.
  5. Types of Materials: Selection will include monographs and periodicals, encyclopedias, dictionaries, compendia, treatises, proceedings/transactions of conference/congresses/symposia, and data collections. Periodicals are of primary importance. Audio-visual materials as well as CD-ROM products and interactive video will be acquired when needed.
  6. Date of Publication: Emphasis is on materials published since 1995. Retrospective purchasing will be very selective.

3.60.5.12 Nursing Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Purpose:

This policy serves as a guide for the library in supporting curricular and instructional needs of the Nursing Department’s programs at GGC.

Categories of concentration in the Nursing Department are:

The nursing program’s concept-based curriculum supports a student-centered, invitational learning environment, which embodies eight domains of nursing care. These domains include: caring, professionalism, critical thinking, wellness and illness, leadership, culture and diversity, technology and informatics, and evidence-based practice.

Material selected for Nursing will overlap with that selected for other departments, e.g., Biology, Sociology, Social Work, Exercise Science, Chemistry, Math, and Psychology

GGC Library Collection Development will focus on the following subdisciplines of Nursing:

Health Assessment Gerontology
Nursing Research Child-bearing Family
Integrated Pathophysiology Mental Health
Nursing Professionalism  
Community Nursing Critical Care
Pharmacology Public Health
Pediatrics Nursing Leadership

General Collection Guidelines:

  1. Language: The primary language of the collection is English.
  2. Chronological Guidelines: The primary emphasis is on current materials.
  3. Geographical Guidelines: The major focus is on material related to the United States; however, this focus does include cross-cultural nursing. Interest is also placed on scholarly materials that are international and multi-cultural in scope.
  4. Treatment of Subject: Biographies of psychologists will be collected selectively. History of nursing will be collected broadly. There is a strong emphasis on techniques and research methods involving the use of statistics, mathematical models, and computer applications. Works on the medical or biological aspects of psychology, including psychiatry, will be acquired selectively. Textbooks and works written on a popular level will be restricted.
  5. Types of Materials: At the request of the Dean of Allied health and the Nursing Faculty, most materials acquired will be in the form of ebooks and periodicals with periodicals of great importance. Periodicals will be collected in electronic format unless print is the only format available. In addition to monographs and serial publications, reference works such as encyclopedias and dictionaries of psychology, handbooks, abstracts, indexes, and directories of psychologists and testing centers will be collected. Proceedings, reports of conferences, symposia, international congresses, etc., will be collected selectively. Governmental publications at the national, local and state level will be collected selectively. Purchase of dissertations and theses from other institutions will be very restricted. Collection of media formats such as videos, DVDs, computer software, etc. will be considered at the specific request of the faculty.
  6. Date of Publication: Emphasis is on materials published since 2005. Retrospective purchasing will be very selective.