2023-2024 Administrative Policy Manual Published August 22, 2023 
    
    Jul 25, 2024  
2023-2024 Administrative Policy Manual Published August 22, 2023

Section 4 - Student Affairs



Institutional Responsibility

Policy Number: 4.1.1
Effective Date: February 28, 2023
Revision History: Reviewed May 26, 2016

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

GGC adheres to Board of Regents Policy Manual 4.1.1 Institutional Responsibility.

II. Scope

All members of the GGC community should be aware of and comply with this policy.

 

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Policy Number: 4.1.1.1
Effective Date: February 28, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016; June 30, 2012
Policy Contact(s):  Associate Provost for Student Affairs and Dean of Students

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Georgia Gwinnett College has as its primary mission the development of an intellectual community within an environment that values honesty, fairness, integrity, and respect for others. In accordance with the American Council on Education statement on Academic Rights and Responsibilities, GGC welcomes intellectual pluralism and the free exchange of ideas. GGC encourages debate over complex and difficult issues about which individuals disagree. Such discussions will be held in an environment characterized by openness, tolerance, and civility. As such, GGC recognizes its responsibility to provide a secure learning environment which allows members of the community to express their views in ways which do not disrupt the operation of the College.

Standards for Georgia Gwinnett College students are higher than those of communities not engaged solely in scholarly pursuits. Upon accepting enrollment, GGC students acquire rights in, as well as responsibilities to, the Georgia Gwinnett College Community. These rights and responsibilities, embraced by the GGC community in the spirit of the institution’s mission, are considered critical to producing graduates inspired to contribute to local, state, national, and international communities and graduates who are prepared to anticipate and respond to an uncertain and changing world.

Specific student rights include:

  • The right to access technology, classrooms, information resources, and instruction in various active-learning environments which enhance the student learning experience.
  • The right to attend classes in an environment which promotes active-learning and student engagement.
  • The right to communicate ideas in written and oral form free of discrimination as defined by federal, state, local, and institutional regulations.
  • The right to express diverse opinions, to think creatively and critically, in inter- and multidisciplinary contexts, in ways which do not infringe on the rights of others.
  • The right to participate in activities, programs, and leadership opportunities designed to enhance academic, social, and personal development while providing practical opportunities for the application of knowledge.
  • The right to access established academic and administrative policies and procedures for presenting, addressing, and resolving student concerns, complaints, and grievances.
  • The right to participate in an institutional system of shared governance designed to inspire and encourage student development through community participation on judicial boards, programming boards, and other institutional boards.
  • The right to be free from unreasonable intrusion in personal, health, safety, or student disciplinary records, in accordance with APM 10.9 Student Education Records Management.

Students are not only members of the academic community but are also members of the larger society. Students retain the rights, guarantees and protections afforded to, and the responsibilities held by, all citizens. A student may be subject to prosecution by local, state, or federal law enforcement agencies irrespective of whether the College initiates student integrity proceedings in a given situation.

As members of the College community, students have the responsibility to:

  • Adhere to local, state, and federal laws.
  • Act in a manner that demonstrates integrity and respect for others and the campus environment.
  • Follow the College conduct regulations contained in the Student Handbook: Rights, Responsibilities, and General Information.
  • Adhere to the principles contained in the Honor Statement.

It is furthermore an expectation of the College Community that students will engage in learning opportunities inside and outside the classroom, participate in on-going assessment of the campus learning environment, utilize the campus mentoring program, and ultimately, contribute to the to the local, state, national, and international community.

The Georgia Gwinnett College community recognizes that every situation a student may encounter may not be anticipated in a written document. In order to provide direction for the expectation that students demonstrate integrity and respect for others and the campus environment, Georgia Gwinnett College has created a Student Code of Conduct as a means of clearly articulating student rights, responsibilities, and expectations.

The Student Code of Conduct provides useful information to students, clubs and organizations that have been charged with violating a conduct regulation. All procedures for responding to possible violations of conduct regulations, including specifics of the student integrity process, a listing of possible sanctions, complaint, and appeals procedures are included in the Student Handbook: Rights, Responsibilities, and General Information. These procedures have been established to ensure due process and fundamental fairness to all involved in the College’s student integrity process.

Georgia Gwinnett College has adopted conduct regulations for individuals and organizations and has established a student integrity process to foster an active learning environment designed to enhance academic, social, and personal development while protecting the rights and privileges of all students. When a student, club or organization is suspected of violating a conduct regulation, the Division of Student Affairs is responsible for investigating alleged conduct regulation violations and coordinating the student integrity process.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC students.

III. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies and Procedures

BOR Policy Manual 4.6.5 Standards for Institutional Student Conduct Investigation and Disciplinary Proceedings
BOR Policy Manual 6.7 Sexual Misconduct Policy
BOR Policy Manual 6.26 Application for Discretionary Review

 

Student Complaints

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College has procedures for resolving written student complaints. The complaint may be alleging the student’s rights have been abridged by violating college rules and procedures. Students who disagree with a decision made by a college official and wish to file a written complaint should contact the Office of the Dean of Students or follow the appropriate appeal procedure under the “Appeals” section later in this handbook. Grievances will be directed to the next level of authority above which the complaint or decision was made.

Please note, a student may not file a complaint under this section if the subject matter is covered under another institutional policy or complaint procedure.

Filing a Written Student Complaint

The student is encouraged to first discuss the matter with the other party. Every effort should be made to follow the chain of command in the resolution of the complaint first. If the student wishes to pursue the grievance, the student should file a written complaint online at student complaints. The Dean of Students or his/her designee will review the complaint and a decision shall be given to the student within 10 working days after the matter has been presented. The time may be extended for extenuating circumstances.

Appeals of the Student Complaint Process

If the complaint cannot be resolved to the satisfaction of the student, the student may file an appeal in writing with the Office of the Senior Associate Provost for Student Affairs (SAPSA) stating the reasons and grounds for the appeal within 10 working days of receiving the decision of the Dean of Students or his/her designee. The appeal shall be reviewed by an ad hoc panel comprising at least three (3) persons. One (1) must be a student; the others may be a faculty member or administrator as deemed appropriate by the SAPSA. The panel shall assemble to hear the complaint and decide by a majority vote based upon the information presented. The panel shall make a decision within 10 working days from the appeal hearing and shall inform the student in writing of their decision. If the person directly involved is not satisfied with the decision, he or she may file an appeal in writing to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs (SVPASA)/Provost within 10 business days. If the student wishes to appeal the SVPASA/Provost’s decision, he/she may then appeal to the President of the College submitting the same documentation as was submitted earlier in the process within 10 business days of the Provost’s decision. The decision of the President of the College is final.

Intellectual Diversity/Academic Freedom

In cases dealing with alleged Intellectual Diversity/Academic Freedom infractions, students are encouraged to follow the informal and formal procedures above. In matters where the student can demonstrate a justifiable reason(s) for why an initial concern could not be discussed with the other party, a written detailed grievance with a justification statement may be filed directly to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost for consideration within 10 business days of the alleged infraction. The Provost will respond to the student within 10 working days after receipt of the grievance. Upon receipt of a final decision by the Provost, the student may make a written appeal of that decision to the President of the College within five (5) business days. The decision of the President represents the final institutional decision.

Once the President’s decision has been rendered, any further appeal, if applicable, must be filed with Board of Regents in accordance with the procedures and timelines noted in published Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 8.6 Application for Discretionary Review.

 

4.1.1.1.2 Academic Integrity Policy for Academic Dishonesty Matters

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The following are conduct regulations related to academic integrity:

  1. Academic Dishonesty. Examples of specific prohibited actions include but are not limited to the following:
  1.  Academic Misconduct: Performing, attempting to perform, or assisting another in performing any act of academic dishonesty.
  2. Cheating: This act of dishonesty includes but is not limited to giving information to or taking information from other students during examinations. Cheating is also committed when students copy from unauthorized sources and/or represent some other person’s work as their own. Collaboration on out-of-class assignments or examinations is considered to be cheating if prohibited by the professor.
  3. Plagiarism: This category includes copying material from unpublished or published sources, including electronic resources, and submitting that material as the student’s own work. Students are responsible for identifying the proper source and for giving credit to that source anytime that they present ideas which are not their own.
  4. Unauthorized Use or Possession of Materials or Resources: Students must not use or possess unauthorized materials or resources in an academic activity. This act includes but is not limited to use/possession of a cheat sheet when not authorized to do so or use/possession of any other resources or materials during an examination, quiz, or other academic activity without the express permission of the faculty member, whether access to such resources or materials is through a cell phone, other electronic device, or any other means.
  5. Collusion: This act of dishonesty includes but is not limited to buying or selling material which will be misrepresented as a student’s own work. In addition, students who fail to report known acts of academic dishonesty on the part of others are responsible for collusion.
  6. Previously submitted material: Students must not submit work which has been or is being concurrently submitted, in whole or in part, in another class without first having received the permission of all the professors involved.
  7. Misrepresentation or falsification of material: This act includes but is not limited to misrepresenting, fabricating, or altering academic material, such as transcripts, diplomas, grades or records, professors’ or administrators’ signatures or initials. In addition, students must not take an examination or test in the name of another student or present another student’s work as their own.
  8. Misrepresentation of circumstances: Students must not misrepresent personal circumstances (e.g., illness, conflicting responsibilities, etc.) to avoid meeting academic responsibilities or to gain an academic advantage.

Procedures for Resolving Violations of the Academic Integrity Policy

All violations of the Academic Integrity Policy shall be resolved via the Faculty Adjudication Process and/or the Formal Resolution (Student Integrity Board hearing through the Office of Student Integrity) as outlined below.

Any member of the community may report an alleged violation. A violation may be reported to the instructor of the course in which the alleged act occurred, to the dean of the school with which the course is affiliated, or to a staff member within the Office of Student Integrity or Dean of Students Office. An individual who suspects a student of academic misconduct may at any time contact the Office of Student Integrity to receive assistance with any aspect of the academic integrity process. All reports should be in written form.

When an instructor believes that a student has violated the Academic Integrity Policy in one of the instructor’s classes, the instructor must first contact the Office of Student Integrity to report the alleged violation and determine whether to proceed with the Faculty Adjudication Process or the Formal Resolution (Student Integrity Board hearing). The instructor should also notify the dean of the school of the alleged violation.

Faculty Adjudication Process

The Faculty Adjudication Process should be utilized when the student does not have any prior academic dishonesty cases (in which the student was found responsible) and if the behavior does not warrant more than academic sanctions. If the instructor and dean believe a student’s behavior may warrant a suspension, expulsion, or other nonacademic sanction, the case should be referred to a Formal Resolution (Student Integrity Board hearing). After the instructor, dean, and the Office of Student Integrity have established that the case should be resolved through the Faculty Adjudication Process, the following steps should be followed:

  1. The instructor will complete the Faculty Adjudication Form.
  2. The instructor will notify the student of the need to meet to discuss the allegations (via email or other written form).
  3. The student shall then have five business days from the time of the notification to contact the instructor to schedule a meeting. If a student drops or withdraws from a course in which he/she is found responsible of an academic dishonesty violation, the College reserves the right to assign the student a grade of “WF” for that course.
  4. The instructor shall then meet with the student. Both the student and the instructor may invite an advisor to be present during this meeting and any phase of this process; however, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in the process. During the meeting, the instructor will share the completed Faculty Adjudication Form and all other evidence with the student. The student will have the opportunity to speak and share any additional information with the instructor.
  5. At the conclusion of the meeting, the instructor will make a decision regarding the allegation. The standard of proof shall be preponderance of evidence. One of the following actions should result from this meeting:
  1. The instructor determines that no violation of academic dishonesty occurred. The instructor will notify the student via email or other written form that no violation occurred. The Office of Student Integrity and the dean of the school will also be notified. The matter shall then be closed.
  2. The instructor determines that the student is responsible for the violation of academic dishonesty and assigns an academic sanction (refer to Sanctioning Guidelines). The student is then asked to sign the Faculty Adjudication Form. The instructor must then send the completed Faculty Adjudication Form and all other evidence/documentation to the Office of Student Integrity.
  3. If the student chooses to not schedule a meeting or fails to attend a scheduled meeting, the student will be found responsible for the violation of academic dishonesty. The instructor must send the completed Faculty Adjudication Form and all other evidence/documentation to the Office of Student Integrity.
  1. Once the Faculty Adjudication Form and other evidence/documentation are received by the Office of Student Integrity, a staff member in the office will send a decision letter of responsibility and sanctions to the student, the instructor, dean of the school, Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost, Senior Associate Provost for Student Affairs, and Dean of Students. A copy of the decision letter will also be filed in the student’s conduct record within the Office of Student Integrity.

Sanctioning Guidelines for Academic Dishonesty Violations

The appropriate sanction(s) for a violation of academic dishonesty must be decided on a case-by-case basis as appropriate by academic discipline, teaching method, course level, academic classification, maturity of the student, and degree of misconduct. The instructor may issue any of the sanctions listed below separately or in combination:

  1. Failure of the course
  2. Reduction of final course grade
  3. No credit (“0” for assignment)
  4. Reduction of points earned on the assignment
  5. Retake/replace assignment
  6. Reprimand: Stated disapproval or a warning issued to the student
  7. Referral to educational seminar/workshop.

The Office of Student Integrity will monitor any sanction deadlines assigned.

Appeals of Faculty Adjudication Process

Students wishing to appeal a decision from the Faculty Adjudication Process must file an appeal with the appropriate dean. The student will have 15 calendar days from the date of the decision letter to submit the written appeal (including all supporting documentation) to the dean. An interview with the student and/or the course instructor may be a part of the dean’s decision. The dean will issue a decision letter to the student within 15 calendar days of the date the appeal was submitted or refer the case to a Formal Resolution. A copy of this letter will also be sent to the instructor and the Office of Student Integrity.

If the student wishes to appeal the dean’s decision, he/she may then appeal to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost within 15 calendar days of the decision. The Provost will issue a decision letter to the student or remand the case back to a Formal Resolution. If the student wishes to appeal the Provost’s decision, he/she may then appeal to the President of the College within 15 calendar days of the Provost’s decision. The decision of the President of the College is final.

In instances where the campus is closed for holidays or other reasons, the timelines noted herein will be extended.

Formal Resolution (Student Integrity Board Hearing)

If the instructor, dean, and the Office of Student Integrity establish that the case should not be resolved through the Faculty Adjudication Process, the case will be referred to a Formal Resolution (Student Integrity Board hearing) via the Student Integrity Process outlined later in this Code.

 

Student Voting Privileges

Policy Number: 4.1.3
Effective Date: February 28, 2023
Revision/Review History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact(s): Associate Provost for Student Affairs/Dean of Students

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Students are encouraged to vote in all federal, state, and local elections. A student whose class schedule would otherwise prevent him or her from voting will be permitted an excused absence for the interval reasonably required for voting.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all students.

III. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

BOR Policy Manual 4.1.3 Student Voting Privileges

   

Fraternities and Sororities

Policy Number: 4.1.4
Effective Date: April 18, 2023
Revision History: None
Policy Contact: Director of Student Involvement and Student Center

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Georgia Gwinnett College recognizes that involvement in fraternities and sororities provides students with the opportunities to make new friends, develop leadership skills, serve the community, get involved on campus, and enhance academic potential. Greek letter organizations are built on a foundation of scholarship, service, and leadership, which align with GGC’s mission and institutional values. The mission of Fraternity and Sorority Life at Georgia Gwinnett College is to promote service, scholarship, sisterhood/brotherhood through social fraternities and sororities. Students involved in Greek letter organizations will have the opportunity to develop leadership and professional skills while making meaningful connections. By participating in social fraternities and sororities, students will experience a higher level of engagement at Georgia Gwinnett College. For specific guidelines on fraternities and sororities at GGC, consult the Fraternity and Sorority Life Handbook.

II. Scope

Each fraternity and sorority must familiarize themselves with the content of the Fraternity and Sorority Life Handbook and comply with policies, procedures, and expectations.

III. Roles and Responsibilities

Chapter officers are responsible for educating individual members, including new members, and alumni/ae about these policies. Chapters may be held responsible for the actions of members and guests that do not comply with stated policies.

 

 

Students with Disabilities and Disability Services

Policy Number: 4.1.5
Effective Date: February 28, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Director of Disability Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

As required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), Disability Services at GGC ensures non-discrimination by facilitating the necessary modification or accommodations for qualified students with disabilities. GGC follows the established USG common standards and procedures for evaluating and administering accommodations for students with documented disabilities. These standards and procedures can be found in the Board of Regents Academic and Student Affairs Handbook. GGC is committed to providing opportunities for all students to reach their full potential, both academically and personally, by ensuring an equal educational experience and equivalent access to classes and campus life. Any student with a documented disability or special need who requires assistance or accommodations based on their disability, should notify and register with Disability Services as soon as possible upon acceptance to the College.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC faculty, staff, and students as well as any associated vendor or contractor who may be providing services or events to GGC students.

III. Definitions

Qualified Students with Disabilities: A qualified student with a disability is one who has met the minimum requirements of the program with or without accommodations and has submitted their documentation that meets the common USG standards and followed the established procedures to register with Disability Services at GGC.

IV. Roles and Responsibilities

Ensuring non-discrimination is a shared responsibility with all areas of the College faculty, staff, and constituents. Disability Services is the established office for facilitating accommodations with students who self-identify and register with the College. Faculty are responsible for ensuring accessible content and teaching strategies within their individual classrooms. Collaboratively, facilities, operations, procurement, auxiliary, student affairs, information technology, admissions, and all other administrative offices on campus also have a responsibility for non-discrimination and ensuring practices  meet the common need for inclusion of people with disabilities. 

V. Compliance

An employee or course instructor’s failure to comply with the Disability Services policy may result in a violation of the state or federal laws as well as GGC policies.

VI. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

Board of Regents Policy Manual 4.1.5 Student with Disabilities

 

Assistance Animals

Policy Number: 4.1.5.2
Effective Date: December 19, 2023
Revision History: April 18, 2023; Reviewed May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Associate Provost for Student Affairs and Dean of Students; Director of Payroll and Benefits

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC”) is committed to making reasonable accommodation to afford people with disabilities an equal opportunity to access its programs, services, and activities. This policy covers the requirements for permitting Assistance Animals at GGC.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC students and employees.

III. Definitions

Assistance Animal: “Assistance Animals” include all Service Animals, Service Animals in Training, and Emotional Support Animals.

Emotional Support Animal: An “Emotional Support Animal” is an animal that provides emotional support that eases one or more identified symptoms or effects of a person’s disability. Unlike Service Animals, Emotional Support Animals are not trained to perform work or tasks, and they include species other than dogs and miniature horses.

Pet: A “pet” is any animal kept for ordinary use and companionship. Service Animals and Emotional Support Animals, as defined in this policy, are not considered pets. Pets are prohibited indoors on the Georgia Gwinnett College campus.

Service Animal: A “Service Animal” means any dog or miniature horse that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. The work or tasks performed by a Service Animal must be directly related to the person’s disability. The provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship does not constitute work or tasks for the purpose of this definition.

Service Animal in Training: While a Service Animal is being trained, it is a “Service Animal in Training.”

IV. Compliance
  1. Service Animals
    1. Service animals will be permitted to accompany people with disabilities in all areas of GGC’s facilities where students, members of the public, and other participants in services, programs or activities are allowed to go, including laboratories and the cafeteria, without prior approval or registration. GGC does not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a Service Animal. Institutional representatives may not require a Service Animal to demonstrate its trained tasks or inquire about the disability status of the animal’s owner. GGC cannot ask about the nature or extent of a person’s disability to determine whether a person’s animal qualifies as a Service Animal. However, when it is not readily apparent that a dog is a Service Animal, GGC faculty and staff may make two inquiries to determine whether the dog qualifies as a Service Animal, which are:
      1. Is the Service Animal required because of a disability?
      2. What work or task has the Service Animal been trained to perform?
    2. A dog/miniature horse that exhibits behavior inconsistent with a trained Service Animal, or an individual owner who fails to maintain control of the dog/miniature horse, may result in the institution being allowed to revisit the question of whether the animal is a Service Animal.
    3. For additional information, please contact the appropriate office below:
      1. For students: Office of Disability Services
      2. For employees: Payroll and Benefits
  2. Service Animal in Training
    1. Georgia law allows Service Animals in Training to access GGC Facilities. The owner of a Service Animal in Training must follow the GGC registration procedure. Georgia law (O.C.G.A. § 30-4-2) allows trainers of Service Animals to be accompanied by the Service Animal in Training, but documentation from the training facility must be provided and the Service Animal in Training must have the appropriate required exams and vaccinations.
    2. For additional information, please contact the appropriate office below:
      1. For students: Office of Disability Services
      2. For employees: Payroll and Benefits
  3. Emotional Support Animals
    1. Emotional Support Animals are not allowed to accompany persons with disabilities in all areas of GGC, but they may reside in Student Housing with people who have disabilities and who have followed the required procedures for registration of the Emotional Support Animal each semester. Before an Emotional Support Animal can move into GGC Student Housing, a request must be submitted to GGC’s Disability Services office and approval must be granted (preferably 2 weeks prior to move in). Requests must include documentation stating general identifying information about the Emotional Support Animal and about the person with a disability requesting the Emotional Support Animal. Documentation must be from a provider who has a relationship with the individual and specific knowledge of the individual’s need along with information addressing whether the student has a disability that warrants an Emotional Support Animal. The full documentation criteria and procedures are set forth on the GGC website.
    2. Georgia Gwinnett College will permit Emotional Support Animals in Student Housing as an accommodation for residents (students or employees) with disabilities who meet the legal requirements for such animal under the Fair Housing Act (“FHA”), 42 U.S.C.A. § 3604(f), which is enforced by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (“HUD”).​
V. Responsibility
  1. GGC is not responsible for the care or supervision of Assistance Animals. People with Assistance Animals are responsible for the cost, care, and supervision of Assistance Animals, including:
    1. Compliance with any laws pertaining to animal licensing, vaccination, and owner identification;
    2. Keeping the animal under control and taking effective action when it is out of control; and,
    3. Feeding and walking the animal and disposing of its waste. Owners are required to bag waste and dispose of it in outdoor receptacle bins/dumpsters. Owners may not use the building internal trash chutes.
  2. GGC will not require any surcharges or fees for Assistance Animals. However, an owner of an Assistance Animal may be charged for damage caused by an Assistance Animal to the same extent that GGC would normally charge a person for the damage they cause.
  3. People with disabilities who are accompanied by Assistance Animals must comply with the same College rules regarding noise, safety, disruption, and cleanliness as people without disabilities.​
VI. Restrictions and Removals
  1. GGC may pose some restrictions on, and may even remove, Assistance Animals in certain instances. Restrictions or removals will be considered on a case-by-case basis in accordance with applicable laws, but an animal may have restrictions imposed or be removed if:
    1. It is out of control and effective action is not taken to control it;
    2. It is not housebroken (or in the case of an Assistance Animal that deposits waste in a designated cage or litter box, the owner fails to clean such cage or box such that the cleanliness of the room is not maintained); or,
    3. It poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others that cannot be mitigated by reasonable modifications of policies, practices, or procedures, or the provision of auxiliary aids or services.
  2. In considering whether an animal poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others, GGC will make an individualized assessment, based on reasonable judgment, current medical knowledge, or the best available objective evidence, to determine: (1) the nature, duration, and severity of the risk; (2) the probability that the potential injury will actually occur; and (3) whether reasonable modifications of policies, practices, or procedures will mitigate the risk.
  3. In the event that restriction or removal of a student’s Assistance Animal is determined to be necessary, the student will be notified by the Dean of Students or Student Housing as provided below and will still be given the opportunity to participate in the service, program, or activity without having the Assistance Animal present. Students may contact Disability Services to reevaluate their reasonable accommodation(s). 
  4. In the event that restriction or removal of an employee’s Service Animal is determined to be necessary, the employee will be notified by Payroll and Benefits and will still be given the opportunity to participate in the service, program or activity without having the Service Animal present. Employees may contact Payroll and Benefits to reevaluate their reasonable accommodation(s).
  5. If removal of an Assistance Animal is required from Student Housing, the owner will be notified in writing by Student Housing that the Assistance Animal must be removed from campus. The owner will be given 48 business hours to make arrangements for removal. If the owner does not comply, the College will remove the animal and relinquish the animal to a local animal shelter. If the owner fails to comply with the removal request, the owner may be referred to the Office of Student Integrity. If an owner has their Assistance Animal removed from Student Housing, they may be charged for damage caused by an Assistance Animal to the same extent that GGC would normally charge a person for the damage they cause. Removal of an Assistance Animal does not release a student from any Student Housing contractual obligations.
  6. Any Assistance Animal found unattended in or on any GGC property may be taken to a local animal shelter. Owners of animals that have been removed will be held responsible for payment of any fees required to secure the release of their animal.
  7. Assistance Animal owners may appeal restriction and removal decisions as set forth in Section IX below.
VII. Etiquette for Members of GGC Community
  1. To ensure equal access and nondiscrimination of people with disabilities, members of the GGC community must abide by the following practices:
    1. Allow Assistance Animals to accompany people with disabilities on campus where permitted;
    2. Do not ask for details about a person’s disabilities;
    3. Do not pet an Assistance Animal, as it distracts the animal from its work;
    4. Do not feed an Assistance Animal;
    5. Do not deliberately startle, tease, or taunt an Assistance Animal; and,
    6. Do not separate or attempt to separate a person from their Assistance Animal.
  2. If you have a disability that may be affected by the presence of animals, students please contact the Office of Disability Services and employees please contact Payroll and Benefits. GGC is committed to ensuring that the needs of all people with disabilities are met and will determine how to resolve any conflicts or problems as expeditiously as possible.
VIII. Violations
  1. Should the owner neglect responsibility for maintaining the Assistance Animal’s health, cleanliness, or behavior, GGC will determine an appropriate action plan. This may include a meeting with the Dean of Students (students) or the Director of Payroll and Benefits (employees). Students in violation of this policy may be referred to the Office of Student Integrity. Faculty or staff members in violation of this policy may be referred to Human Resources.
  2. Any members of the GGC community who interfere with an Assistance Animal or the duties it performs may face sanctions under appropriate misconduct charges.
IX. Filing an Appeal or Complaint
  1. If the decision is made to deny a request for or remove an Assistance Animal covered by this policy, or if any other negative College decision related to an Assistance Animal is made, the affected owner may file a formal written grievance with the ADA/Section 504 Coordinator at TitleIX@ggc.edu. This appeal must be submitted in writing within 24 hours of notice of the decision. The decision of the ADA/Section 504 Coordinator will be the final institutional decision.
  2. If a current or prospective student, employee, contractor, visitor or other member of the public disagrees with the manner in which they or their Assistance Animal are treated by GGC personnel or a student, the person may contact the ADA/Section 504 Coordinator in the Office of Equal Opportunity and Title IX Compliance at TitleIX@ggc.edu.
  3. Anyone who wishes to file a complaint involving prohibited discrimination and/or harassment based on disability (or any other protected class) may also contact the Office of Equal Opportunity and Title IX Compliance at TitleIX@ggc.edu.
 

Admission of Persons Not Lawfully Present in The United States

Policy Number: 4.1.6
Effective Date: February 27, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

A person who is not lawfully present in the United States shall not be eligible for admission to any University System institution which, for the two most recent academic years, did not admit all academically qualified applicants (except for cases in which applicants were rejected for non-academic reasons).

II. Scope

All GGC staff, faculty and students should be familiar with this policy. 

III. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures
BOR Policy Manual 4.1.6 Admission of Persons Not Lawfully Present in the United States
 

Title IX/Sexual Misconduct Policy

Policy Number: 4.1.7
Effective Date: April 21, 2023
Revision History: August 14, 2017; June 30, 2016
Policy Contact: Equal Opportunity and Title IX Coordinator

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

In accordance with federal and state law including Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”), Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC” or “College”) does not discriminate on the basis of sex in any of its education programs or activities or in employment. The College is committed to ensuring a safe learning and working environment for all members of the College community. To that end, this policy prohibits Sexual Misconduct, as defined herein.

The College is committed to reducing incidents of Sexual Misconduct, providing prevention tools, conducting ongoing awareness and prevention programming, and training the campus community in accordance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (“Clery Act”) and the Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”). Prevention programming and training will promote positive and healthy behaviors and educate the campus community on consent, sexual assault, sexual harassment, alcohol and drug use, dating violence, domestic violence, stalking, bystander intervention, and reporting.

To affirm its commitment to promoting the goals of fairness and equity in all aspects of the educational and employment programs or activities, the College has developed internal policies and procedures that provide a prompt, fair, and impartial process. This policy applies to all College students and employees, visitors, and individuals doing business with the College, and it applies to conduct between students, between employees, and between an employee and a student.

When Sexual Misconduct does occur, all members of the College community, with the exception of Confidential Employees (defined below) are required to report it promptly through the procedures outlined in this policy.

All Inquiries, Reports or Formal Complaints of Sexual Misconduct or Sexual Harassment as prohibited by this policy, including, questions or concerns, may be made to:

Edith Collins
Director of Equal Opportunity and Title IX/Title IX Coordinator
TitleIX@ggc.edu

Georgia Gwinnett College
1000 University Center Lane
Building B, Suite 3720
678-407-5085

To raise a concern involving bias or conflict of interest by the Title IX Coordinator, or to report misconduct or discrimination by the Title IX Coordinator, contact the General Counsel and Chief Legal Affairs Officer, S. Rebekah Myers, legalaffairs@ggc.edu, or designee. Concerns of bias or a potential conflict of interest by any other employee associated with the Equal Opportunity and Title IX Compliance office should be raised with the Title IX Coordinator.

II. Scope

This policy applies to the employment or educational program and activities of College, to conduct that takes place on the campus or on property owned or controlled by the College, at College-sponsored events, or in buildings owned or controlled by College recognized student organizations. This policy may also be applicable to the effects of off-campus sexual misconduct defined by this policy that effectively deprive someone of access to the College’s educational program or work experience. The College may also extend jurisdiction to off-campus and/or to online conduct when the Title IX Coordinator determines that the conduct affects a substantial College interest. A substantial College interest includes:

  1. Any action that constitutes a criminal offense, as defined by law. This includes, but is not limited to, single or repeat violations of any local, state, or federal law;
  2. Any situation in which it is determined that the Respondent poses an immediate threat to the physical health or safety of any student, employee, member of the College Community or other individual;
  3. Any situation that significantly impacts upon the rights, property, or achievements of an individual or significantly breaches the peace and/or causes social disorder; and/or
  4. Any situation that is detrimental to the educational interests or mission of the College.

Study-abroad programs and off-campus locations that are not within the College’s education program or activity are not covered by the Title IX regulations, but may constitute Sexual Misconduct under this Policy. Regardless of the location of conduct, the College will address notice and/or complaints to determine whether the conduct occurred in the context of its employment or educational program or activity and/or has continuing effects on campus or in an off-campus sponsored program or activity.

All members of the College community (as defined below) are responsible for understanding and complying with this policy. All vendors serving the College through third-party contracts are subject to these policies and procedures. This policy is not intended to infringe or restrict rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution including free speech under the First Amendment, or the due process clauses of Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

III. Policy Definitions

Amorous Relationships: The College follows APM 8.2.23 Amorous Relationships, which prohibits some forms of amorous relationships. However, amorous relationships that are not prohibited under GGC policy may still result in sexual harassment allegations. See APM 8.2.23 Amorous Relationships for additional information.

Coercion: The unreasonable pressure for sexual activity. When someone makes clear that they do not want to engage in certain sexual activity, that they want to stop, or that they do not want to go past a certain point of sexual interaction, continued pressure beyond that point can be coercive.

College Community: Students, faculty, and staff, as well as contractors, vendors, visitors and guests.

Complainant: A student, employee, or third-party who is reported to have experienced Sexual Misconduct as defined by this Policy.

Confidential Employees: Institution employees who have been designated by College’s Title IX Coordinator to talk with an alleged Complainant in confidence. The Title IX Coordinator has designated clinical staff at the College Counseling & Psychological Services (“CAPS”) and medical professionals and staff at Health Services as Confidential Employees. Clinical staff at CAPS and medical professionals and staff at Health Services are Confidential Employees only when acting in the capacity of their role as a counselor or health care provider.

Minimal reporting by Confidential Employees must be submitted in compliance with Title IX and the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (“Clery Act”).

Consent: Knowing, voluntary, and clear permission, by words or actions, to engage in sexual activity.

Individuals may perceive and experience the same interaction in different ways. Therefore, it is the responsibility of each party to determine that the other has consented before engaging in the activity. If consent is not clearly provided prior to engaging in the activity, consent may be ratified by word or action at some point during the interaction, but clear communication from the outset is strongly encouraged.

For consent to be valid, there must be a clear expression in words or actions that the other individual consented to that specific sexual conduct. Reasonable reciprocation may be implied. For example, if both individuals are reciprocating the same conduct, either individual may assume the other is consenting to that conduct. Consent can also be withdrawn once given, as long as the withdrawal is reasonably and clearly communicated. If consent is withdrawn, that sexual activity should cease. Consent to some sexual contact (such as kissing) cannot be presumed to be consent for other sexual activity (such as intercourse). A current or previous intimate relationship does not constitute consent. The existence of consent is based on the totality of the circumstances evaluated from the perspective of a reasonable person in the same or similar circumstances, including the context in which the alleged incident occurred and any similar, previous patterns that may be evidenced.

Examples of situations without consent include, but are not limited to, incompetence, incapacitation from alcohol and/or other drugs, fear, unconsciousness, intimidation, coercion, confinement, isolation, or mental or physical impairment. Minors under the age of 16 cannot legally consent under Georgia law. Consent is also absent when the activity in question exceeds the scope of consent previously given. Past consent does not imply present or future consent. Silence or an absence of resistance does not imply consent.

Education Program or Activity: Locations, events, or circumstances where the College exercises substantial control over both the Respondent and the context in which the Sexual Misconduct occurs and also includes any building owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the College.

Force: The use of physical violence and/or physical imposition to gain sexual access. Force also includes threats, intimidation (implied threats), and coercion that is intended to overcome resistance or produce consent.

Formal Complaint: A written statement, signed by a Complainant or by the Title IX Coordinator, alleging a Respondent engaged in Sexual Misconduct and requesting a College Investigation.

Formal Grievance Process: A method of formal process designated by the College to address conduct that falls within this policy, and which complies with the requirements of the Title IX Regulations (34 CFR Part 106.45).

Informal Resolution: A method of resolution that requires agreement by all Parties involved, as well as the College, and is designated by the College to address conduct that falls within this policy.

Incapacitation: A state in which an individual cannot make rational, reasonable decisions because they lack the capacity to give knowing/informed consent (e.g., to understand the “who, what, when, where, why, or how” of their sexual interaction). A person cannot consent if they are unable to understand what is happening or is disoriented, helpless, asleep, or unconscious, for any reason, including by alcohol or other drugs.

That the Respondent neither knew nor should have known the Complainant to be physically or mentally incapacitated may be raised as a defense. “Should have known” is an objective, reasonable person standard which assumes that a reasonable person is both sober and exercising sound judgment.

Incapacitation is determined through consideration of all relevant indicators of an individual’s state and is not synonymous with intoxication, impairment, blackout, and/or being drunk. 

Investigator: Person(s) charged by the College with gathering facts about an alleged violation of this Policy, assessing relevance and credibility, synthesizing the relevant evidence, and compiling this information into an investigation report.

Reasonable Person: A person using average care, intelligence, and judgment in the known circumstance (similar circumstances and with similar identities to the Complainant).

Respondent: An individual who has been reported to be the perpetrator of conduct that could constitute Sexual Misconduct under this policy.

Responsible Employees: All College employees (faculty, staff, student employees, and administrators), with the exception of Confidential Employees, must immediately report actual or suspected sexual harassment or misconduct defined by this policy to the Title IX Coordinator. Student employees who serve in a supervisory, advisory, or managerial role are considered Responsible Employees for purposes of this Policy (e.g., teaching assistants, residential assistants, student managers, orientation leaders, etc.). Employees must also promptly share all details of behaviors under this Policy that they observe or have knowledge of, even if not directly reported to them. Failure of a Responsible Employee to report an incident, defined by this Policy, of which they become aware, is a violation of College policy and that Responsible Employee can be subject to disciplinary action for failure to comply.

Retaliation: Any adverse action or threatened action, taken or made, personally or through a third party, in response to an individual who has filed a report or complaint, an individual who is the Respondent in any report or complaint, or any other individual who has assisted, engaged or participated in any manner in connection with a report, complaint or inquiry in this policy. Retaliation includes intimidation, coercion, threats, harassment, discrimination or any type of adverse action taken against any individual.

In addition, the College reserves the right to take disciplinary action against any College student or employee who intervenes, interferes or intrudes on the College process. This includes directly or indirectly contacting parties or witnesses and attempting to coerce, correct, change, deter, sway, or alter the memories, statements, or testimony of any individual.

Sexual Misconduct: Includes, but is not limited to, such unwanted behavior as dating violence, domestic violence, nonconsensual sexual contact, sexual exploitation, sexual harassment, and stalking. See further definition below.

Standard of Proof: Preponderance of the evidence threshold that is measured by the Hearing Board to determine if it is more likely than not a violation occurred.

Student: Any person pursuing academic studies at the College, including, but not limited to, any person currently enrolled, previously enrolled, or who is reasonably anticipated to seek enrollment at a future date, or a person who has applied to the College or has been accepted for admission.

Title IX Coordinator: Official designated by the College to ensure compliance with Title IX and this policy. References to the Title IX Coordinator throughout this Policy may also encompass a designee of the Title IX Coordinator for specific tasks.

Sexual Misconduct Definitions

Sexual Misconduct (Not Title IX): “Sexual Misconduct” encompasses all unwelcome conduct based on sex or gender that is so severe and/or pervasive that it has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with a person’s College employment, academic performance, or participation in College programs or activities, or creates a working, learning, program, or activity environment that a reasonable person would find intimidating, hostile, or offensive.

Some Sexual Misconduct, that is sufficiently severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the College’s education program or activity and conduct that conditions an aid or benefit on unwelcome sexual activity, may also constitute Title IX Sexual Misconduct. Title IX Sexual Misconduct is a subset of Sexual Misconduct that rises to a level of severity, pervasiveness and offensiveness such that it is prohibited expressly by Title IX Regulations.

Types of Sexual Misconduct (Not Title IX)

  1. Non-Consensual Sexual Contact (Not Title IX): Any intentional sexual touching, directly or indirectly, without a person’s affirmative consent. Intentional sexual touching includes deliberate contact, under or over clothing, with the breasts, buttocks, groin, or genitals, or conscious and willful touching of another with any of these body parts; making another person touch any of these body parts under or over clothing; and the emission of ejaculate on the clothing or body of another person. This provision also includes fondling, as defined by the Clery Act.
  2. Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse (Not Title IX): Any sexual intercourse, however slight, that is without consent and/or by force. Intercourse includes, but is not limited to, any anal, oral or vaginal penetration by a penis, object, tongue or finger and oral copulation (mouth to genital contact or genital to mouth contact), no matter how slight the penetration or contact. This provision also includes rape, incest, and statutory rape, as defined by the Clery Act.
  3. Sexual Exploitation (Not Title IX): Non-consensual abuse or exploitation of another person’s sexuality for the purpose of sexual gratification, financial gain, personal benefit or advantage, or any other purpose. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:
    1. Invasion of sexual privacy
    2. Taking pictures, video, or audio recording of another in a sexual act, or in any other sexually-related activity when there is a reasonable expectation of privacy during the activity, without the consent of all involved in the activity; or exceeding the boundaries of consent, including the making or posting of revenge pornography
    3. Non-consensual photographing of individuals who are partly undressed, naked, or engaged in sexual acts and transmitting, distributing, or posting those photographs without an individual’s consent
    4. Observing unsuspecting individuals who are partly undressed, naked, or engaged in sexual acts
    5. Prostituting another person
    6. Knowingly transmitting a sexually transmitted disease (STD)
    7. Exposing one’s breasts, buttocks, groin, or genitals without affirmative consent or inducing another to do the same
    8. Causing or attempting to cause the incapacitation of another person (through alcohol, drugs, or any other means) for the purpose of compromising that person’s ability to give consent to sexual activity, or for the purpose of making that person vulnerable to non-consensual sexual activity
    9. Misappropriation of another person’s identity on apps, websites, or other venues designed for dating or sexual connections
    10. Forcing a person to take an action against that person’s will by threatening to show, post, or share information, video, audio, or an image that depicts the person’s nudity or sexual activity (including for financial gain and/or blackmail)
    11. Knowingly soliciting a minor for sexual activity
    12. Engaging in sex trafficking
    13. Knowing creation, possession, or dissemination of child pornography
  4. Sexual Harassment (Not Title IX):
    1. Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual contact or favors, conduct based on gender stereotypes, or other verbal, non-verbal, physical, or visual conduct of a sexual nature constitutes sexual harassment when:
      1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s academic, co-curricular, or campus life activities or of an individual’s employment;
      2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for academic or student life or employment decisions affecting that individual;
      3. The conduct is so severe and/or pervasive that it unreasonably interferes with a person’s College employment, academic performance, or participation in College programs or activities; or
      4. The conduct is so severe and/or pervasive that it creates an intimidating, hostile, demeaning, or offensive campus or living environment or employment setting.
    2. Depending upon the severity and/or pervasiveness of the conduct, sexual harassment may include, for example, subjecting a person to unwelcome sexual attention, physical or verbal advances, sexual flirtations or propositions, vulgar talk or jokes, degrading graphic materials, objects or verbal comments of a sexual nature about an individual’s appearance.
    3. Sexual harassment can occur regardless of the relationship, job title or respective sex, sexual orientation and/or gender identity of the parties.  
  5. Dating Violence (Not Title IX): Violence, on the basis of sex, committed by a person, who is in or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the Complainant. For the purposes of this definition Dating Violence includes, but is not limited to, emotional, mental, verbal, sexual or physical abuse, or the threat of such abuse.
  6. Gender Harassment (Not Title IX): Gender Harassment includes harassment based on actual or perceived sex, sexual orientation, sex-stereotyping, gender identity, gender expression, or pregnancy.  Such harassment may include acts of aggression, intimidation, or hostility, whether verbal, graphic, physical, or otherwise.  For purposes of this policy, Gender Harassment encompasses gender-based discrimination, including, but not limited to, exclusion from any employment or educational activity or experience. For purposes of this policy, a severe incident, even if isolated, can be sufficient. Examples of conduct that may constitute Gender-Based Harassment include, but are not limited to:
    1. A series of written, verbal, or electronic statements that disparage a person based on their actual or perceived sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, or pregnancy;
    2. Disparagement of a person based on perceived lack of stereotypical masculinity or femininity; 
    3. Threats of violence toward an individual based on their actual or perceived identity; within a protected class, or toward an entire sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, or pregnancy status as a group; and/or
    4. Defacing College property, or another individual’s property, with symbols or language intended or understood by a Reasonable Person to disparage or threaten a person or group based on sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, or pregnancy.

Title IX Misconduct

Title IX Misconduct is a subset of Sexual Misconduct that rises to a level of severity and pervasiveness such that it is prohibited expressly by Title IX Regulations. Conduct that does not meet this strict definition for Title IX Misconduct is still prohibited by this policy if it otherwise constitutes Sexual Misconduct. 

Federal law requires the College to define Title IX Sexual Harassment as including Sexual Assault (as defined in 20 U.S.C. 1092(f)(6)(A)(v)), Dating Violence (as defined in 34 U.S.C. 12291(a)(10)), Domestic Violence (as defined in 34 U.S.C. 12291(a)(8)), and Stalking (as defined in 34 U.S.C. 12291(a)(30)). The statutory definitions are the definitions that the College must and will use to decide whether reported conduct falls within the scope of Title IX Misconduct for purposes of this policy.

Alleged conduct is Title IX Misconduct (though it may also be Sexual Misconduct) only if:

  1. The alleged conduct was perpetrated against a person in the United States;
  2. The conduct took place within the College’s Programs or Activities; and
  3. At the time a Formal Complaint is filed, the Complainant was participating in or attempting to participate in the College’s programs or activities.

Types of Title IX Misconduct

Sexual Harassment (Title IX): Sexual Harassment, as an umbrella category, includes the offenses of sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking as defined by Title IX Regulations.

Sexual Harassment under Title IX includes conduct on the basis of sex (including sexual orientation and sex stereotypes) or that is sexual in nature and that satisfies one or more of the following:

  1. Quid Pro Quo (Title IX):
    1. An employee of the College,
    2. Conditions (implicitly or explicitly) the provision of an aid, benefit, or service of the College,
    3. On an individual’s participation in unwelcome sexual conduct.
  2. Sexual Harassment (Title IX):
    1. Unwelcome conduct,
    2. Determined by a reasonable person,
    3. To be so severe, and
    4. Pervasive, and,
    5. Objectively offensive,
    6. That it effectively denies a person equal access to the College’s education program or activity. Severity, pervasiveness, and objective offensiveness are evaluated based on the totality of the circumstances from the perspective of a reasonable person in the same or similar circumstances (“in the shoes of the Complainant”), including the context in which the alleged incident occurred and any similar, previous patterns that may be evidenced. This definition is broad enough to potentially encompass forms of sex-based disparate treatment, even if not harassing in nature.
  3. Sexual Assault (Title IX):
    1. Any sexual act (see Appendix A) directed against another person (this would include having another person touch the Complainant sexually, forcibly, and/or without their consent. These dismissal requirements are mandated by the 2020 Title IX Regulations, 34 CFR §106.45),
    2. Without the consent of the Complainant,
    3. Including instances in which the Complainant is incapable of giving consent, such as: 
      1. Sexual intercourse with another person, including oral or anal sexual intercourse, or the use of an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slightly, the genital or anal opening of the body of another person, without consent of the Complainant, including instances where the Complainant is incapable of giving consent because of their age or because of their temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity;
      2. Touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the Complainant, including instances where the Complainant is incapable of giving consent because of their age or because of their temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity;
      3. Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law; or
      4. Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent (which is 16 in the state of Georgia).
  4. Dating Violence (Title IX):
    1. Violence,
    2. On the basis of sex,
    3. Committed by a person,
    4. Who is in or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the Complainant. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the Complainant’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. For the purposes of this definition-
      1. Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.
      2. Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
  5. Domestic Violence (Title IX):
    1. Violence,
    2. On the basis of sex,
    3. Committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the Complainant,
    4. By a person with whom the Complainant shares a child in common, or
    5. By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the Complainant as a spouse or intimate partner, or
    6. By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the Complainant under the domestic or family violence laws of Georgia, or
    7. By any other person against an adult or youth Complainant who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of Georgia. To categorize an incident as Domestic Violence under this policy, the relationship between the Respondent and the Complainant must be more than just two people living together as roommates. The people cohabitating must be current or former spouses or have an intimate relationship.
  6. Stalking (Title IX):
    1. Engaging in a course of conduct,
    2. On the basis of sex,
    3. Directed at a specific person, that
      1. Would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety, or
      2. The safety of others; or
      3. Would cause a reasonable person to suffer substantial emotional distress.         
    4. For the purposes of this definition-
      1. “Course of conduct” means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the Respondent directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
      2. “Reasonable person” means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the Complainant.
      3. “Substantial emotional distress” means significant mental suffering or anguish that may but does not necessarily require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.
IV. Roles and Responsibilities
  1. Equal Opportunity and Title IX Coordinator (“Title IX Coordinator”): Serves as the Title IX Program Administrator as well as the Nondiscrimination/Anti-Harassment Officer, the College’s Title VI Coordinator, and the College’s Title IX Coordinator.
    1. The Title IX Coordinator is the individual designated by the President with responsibility for providing education and training about prohibited discrimination and harassment to the College community and for receiving and overseeing the investigation of reports and complaints of discrimination and harassment in accordance with this policy. The Title IX Coordinator can be reached at the Equal Opportunity and Title IX Compliance office, located in Building B, Suite 3700, by phone at (678) 407-5085 or via email at titleix@ggc.edu.  
    2. GGC’s Title IX Coordinator oversees implementation of the College’s Sexual Misconduct Policy. The Title IX Coordinator has the primary responsibility for coordinating the College’s efforts related to the intake, investigation, process, resolution, and implementation of supportive measures to stop, remediate, and prevent sexual harassment and sexual misconduct in all forms prohibited under this policy.
    3. The Title IX Coordinator (and all employees associated with the Title IX Office) act with independence and authority free from bias and conflicts of interest. Employees are vetted and trained to ensure they are not biased for or against any party in a specific case, or for or against Complainants and/or Respondents, generally.
  2. Equal Opportunity and Title IX Compliance Investigator: The Equal Opportunity and Title IX Compliance Investigator shall be appointed to investigate individual complaints by the Nondiscrimination/Anti-Harassment Officer or his/her designee to conduct investigations pursuant to alleged violations of this Policy. The Equal Opportunity and Title IX Compliance Investigator also serves as the 504 Coordinator.
V. Reporting Sexual Misconduct
  1. A complainant of Sexual Misconduct may, but need not, make a criminal complaint with law enforcement officials; make a misconduct report with a Responsible Employee or Title IX Coordinator; or make both. A report may be made anonymously, although anonymous reports may make it difficult for the College to address the complaint. Any individual who believes that he or she has been a victim of Sexual Misconduct is encouraged to report allegations of Sexual Misconduct promptly.
  2. Reporting to Title IX Office
    1. Reports of Sexual Misconduct (including Title IX Sexual Misconduct) may be made by contacting the Title IX Coordinator. Any individual may make a report, but the College does not have notice of the report until information is known to a Responsible Employee or the Title IX Coordinator. Upon receiving a report, the Title IX Coordinator has full discretion to conduct inquiries into reports. The Title IX Coordinator may implement any necessary reasonable restrictions to address reported concerns.
    2. Every effort will be made by the College to preserve the privacy of reports. Privacy means that information related to a report will only be shared with a limited number of College employees who need to know. The privacy of student education records will be protected in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”), as outlined in the College’s FERPA policy. The privacy of employee records will be protected in accordance with Human Resources practices and policies. The College reserves the right to designate which College officials have a legitimate educational interest in being informed about incidents that fall within this Policy.
    3. Upon receipt of a report, the Title IX Coordinator will contact the Complainant. That contact will discuss the availability of supportive measures, the invitation to discuss their wishes with respect to implementation of supportive measures, and explain the process of filing a complaint. A report to the College does not automatically prompt an investigation.
    4. The Title IX Coordinator shall notify the USG System Equity Director (“System Director”) of any allegation(s) of Sexual Misconduct that could, standing alone as reported, lead to the suspension or expulsion of the Respondent(s). The System Director will work with the College to determine whether any support services or supportive measure(s) are necessary and to assign an investigator who will work under the direction of the System Director or designee, if directed by System Director. If an allegation is not initially identified as one that would lead to the suspension or expulsion of the Respondent(s), but facts arise during the course of the investigation that could lead to the Respondent’s suspension or expulsion, the Title IX Coordinator shall notify the System Director or designee. The System Director shall have the discretion to oversee the handling of the complaint.
    5. All Sexual Misconduct investigations involving a student Respondent, shall follow the investigation process set forth in BOR Policy Manual 4.6.5 Standards for Institutional Student Conduct Investigation and Disciplinary Proceedings.
    6. All Sexual Misconduct investigations involving an employee Respondent, shall be addressed utilizing Board and institutional employment policies and procedures including Human Resources Administrative Practice Manual, Prohibit Discrimination & Harassment.
  3. Unknown or Non-College Community Respondent
    1. If the Respondent is unknown or is not a member of the College community, the Title IX Coordinator will assist the Complainant in identifying appropriate resources and support options. If criminal conduct is alleged, the College may assist in contacting law enforcement if the individual would like to file a police report.
    2. If the Respondent is enrolled in or employed by another institution, the Title IX Coordinator may assist the Complainant in liaising with the appropriate individual at that institution, as it may be possible to allege violations through that institution’s policy.
    3. In addition, the College may take other actions as appropriate to protect the Complainant against third parties, such as barring individuals from College property and/or events.
  4. Filing a Formal Complaint
    1. When a Complainant has experienced Sexual Misconduct (including Title IX Misconduct), the Complainant may file a Formal Complaint with the Title IX Coordinator in person or by email. A Formal Complaint must be a written statement or electronic submission, signed by a Complainant or by the Title IX Coordinator, alleging a Respondent engaged in Sexual Misconduct and requesting initiation of a College Investigation.
    2. The Title IX Coordinator has discretion to file a Formal Complaint of reported Sexual Misconduct, even if the Complainant chooses not to participate in the process and/or does not wish to file a Formal Complaint, when the Title IX Coordinator determines the that the report includes conduct that poses a threat to the health, safety and well-being of the community. The Title IX Coordinator may consider the following factors: the seriousness of the alleged conduct, the Complainant’s age and/or whether there have been other complaints of Sexual Misconduct against the same Respondent.
    3. After a Formal Complaint has been filed by a Complainant or signed by the Title IX Coordinator, the College will commence its formal grievance process.
    4. Although there is no time limitation on filing a Formal Complaint to the Title IX Coordinator, if a significant amount of time has passed, the ability to investigate, respond, and provide remedies may be more limited or impossible. Therefore, if an investigation has been significantly impacted by the passage of time, the Title IX Coordinator may use discretion to document allegations for future reference, offer supportive measures and/or remedies, and/or engage in informal or formal action, as appropriate.
    5. All Formal Complaints shall be acted upon promptly by the College once received. Typically, Formal Complaint Investigations and subsequent adjudication can take 60-120 business days to resolve. Exceptions and extenuating circumstances can cause the process and resolution to take longer, but the College will avoid all undue delays within its control. If the general timeframes will be delayed, the College will provide written notice to the parties of the delay, the cause of a delay, and an estimate of the anticipated additional time that will be needed as a result of the delay.
    6. OCR: Individuals also have the right to file an external grievance with:

Office for Civil Rights (OCR)
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20202-1100
Customer Service Hotline #: (800) 421-3481
Facsimile: (202) 453-6012
TDD#: (877) 521-2172
Email: OCR@ed.gov
Web: www.ed.gov/ocr

  1. College Reports
    1. Complainants of Sexual Misconduct who wish to file a report with the College should notify a Responsible Employee or the Title IX Coordinator. Responsible Employees informed about Sexual Misconduct allegations involving any student should not attempt to resolve the situation but must notify and report all relevant information to the Title IX Coordinator as soon as practicable. Confidential Employees are not bound by this requirement but may be required to report limited information about incidents without revealing the identities of the individuals involved to the Title IX Coordinator, consistent with their ethical and legal obligations, including the Clery Act.
    2. All members of the College community are encouraged to report incidents of Sexual Misconduct promptly. The Title IX Coordinator’s identity and contact information shall be published by each institution prominently on the College’s website, as well as in any relevant publication. The College may choose to have Deputy Title IX Coordinators to whom reports may be made, as well. The College encourages Complainants to report their complaints in writing, though oral complaints should also be reviewed, taken seriously, and investigated, to the extent possible. For the purposes of Title IX, all formal complaints must be made in writing and the Complainant must be participating in an education program or activity of the College. While complaints should be made as quickly as possible following an alleged incident of Sexual Misconduct, all reports should be accepted regardless of when reported.
    3. False Allegations and Evidence. Conclusively and deliberately false and/or malicious accusations under this policy, as opposed to allegations which, even if erroneous, are made in good faith, are a serious offense and will be subject to appropriate disciplinary action. This does not include allegations that are made in good faith but are ultimately shown to be erroneous or do not result in a policy violation determination. Additionally, witnesses and parties knowingly providing false evidence, tampering with or destroying evidence after being directed to preserve such evidence, or deliberately misleading an official who is investigating, can be subject to discipline. This includes informing witnesses of allegations and attempting to coerce, instruct, conceal or intervene in with witnesses’ statements and/or recollections, or persuading witnesses to recall or alter specific details or recollection.
  2. Law Enforcement Reports
    1. Because Sexual Misconduct may constitute criminal activity, a Complainant also has the option, should they so choose, of filing a report with campus or local police, for their own protection and that of the surrounding community. The College may assist the Complainant in reporting the situation to law enforcement officials. Filing a criminal report does not automatically constitute a report to the Title IX Coordinator.
    2. Complainants considering filing a report of sexual misconduct with law enforcement should preserve any evidence of Sexual Misconduct, including, but not limited to, the following:
      1. Clothing worn during the incident including undergarments;
      2. Sheets, bedding, and condoms, if used;
      3. Lists of witnesses with contact information;
      4. Text messages, call history, social media posts;
      5. Pictures of injuries; and/or
      6. Videos.
  3. Anonymous Reports. The College provides a mechanism by which individuals can report incidents of alleged Sexual Misconduct anonymously by completing a report online. Complainants should understand, however, that it will be more difficult for the College to investigate and to take action upon anonymous reports.  Additionally, all reports must comply with the requirements of the Title IX Regulations (34 CFR Part 106) which may bar GGC from further investigation of the report. 
  4. Complaint Consolidation. GGC reserves the right to consolidate complaints as to allegations of Sexual Misconduct against more than one Respondent, by more than one Complainant against one or more Respondents, or cross-complaints between parties, where the allegations of Sexual Misconduct arise out of the same facts or circumstances.
  5.  Complaint Dismissal
    1. Mandatory Dismissal of the complaint, as mandated by the 2020 Title IX Regulations, 34 CFR §106.45, will occur if, in their discretion, the Title IX Coordinator determines that:
      1. The conduct alleged in the formal complaint would not constitute Title IX Misconduct as defined above, even if proved; and/or
      2. The conduct did not occur in an educational program or activity controlled by the College (including buildings or property controlled by recognized student organizations), and/or the College does not have control of the Respondent; and/or
      3. The conduct did not occur against a person in the United States; and/or
      4. At the time of filing a formal complaint, a Complainant is not participating in or attempting to participate in the education program or activity of the recipient.
    2. Discretionary Dismissal may occur if, at any time during the process:
      1. A Complainant notifies the Title IX Coordinator in writing that the Complainant would like to withdraw the formal complaint or any allegations therein; or
      2. The Respondent is no longer enrolled in or employed by the recipient; or
      3. Specific circumstances prevent the College from gathering evidence sufficient to reach a determination as to the formal complaint or allegations therein.
    3. Dismissal of a Formal Complaint does not preclude action under another applicable College or USG policy. In the event of dismissal, the Title IX Coordinator may refer the matter to any other appropriate department. Upon any dismissal, the Title IX Coordinator will promptly send written notice of the dismissal and the rationale for doing so simultaneously to the parties.
  6. Amnesty. Individuals should be encouraged to come forward and to report Sexual Misconduct notwithstanding their choice to consume alcohol or to use drugs. Information reported by an individual during an investigation concerning use of drugs or alcohol will not be used against the particular individual in a disciplinary proceeding or voluntarily reported to law enforcement; however, individuals may be provided with resources on drug and alcohol counseling and/or education, as appropriate.
  7. Handling Reports of Sexual Misconduct. All reports of Sexual Misconduct must be made or referred to the Title IX Coordinator. The College’s complaint process for handling reports of non-Title IX Sexual Misconduct are available in GGC’s APM Section 12.1 Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy.
  8. Supportive Measures
    1. Supportive measures are non-disciplinary, non-punitive individualized services offered by the College as appropriate, as reasonably available, without fees, to restore or preserve access to the College’s employment or education program or activity, including measures designed to protect the safety of all parties and/or the College’s environment, and/or deter any Sexual Misconduct under this Policy.
    2. Once a student or employee makes a complaint or receives notice that a complaint has been made against him or her, or the Title IX Coordinator otherwise learns of a complaint of Sexual Misconduct, then the Complainant, Respondent and alleged Complainant (where applicable) should receive written information about supportive measures available at the College.
    3. The College will offer and implement appropriate and reasonable supportive measures to the parties. The College will maintain the privacy of the supportive measures, provided that privacy does not impair the College’s ability to provide the supportive measures.
    4. These supportive measures may include, but are not limited to:
      1. Referral to community-based service providers and/or resources
      2. Visa and immigration assistance
      3. Student financial aid assistance
      4. Providing campus safety escorts
      5. Providing specific transportation assistance
      6. Implementing No Contact Directives between the parties
      7. Academic support, extensions of deadlines, or other course/program-related adjustments that are considered reasonable accommodations
      8. Trespass from campus
      9. Class schedule modifications, withdrawals, or leaves of absence
      10. Increased security and monitoring of certain areas of the campus
      11. Assistance with reporting to law enforcement: If the Complainant chooses, the College may assist in filing a report with the appropriate law enforcement agency
      12. No contact order: GGC Public Safety, the Title IX coordinator, Associate Provost for Student Affairs and Dean of Students (“DOS”), and/or Chief Human Resources Officer (“CHRO”) may impose a “no-contact” order, which typically will include a directive that the parties refrain from having any contact with one another, directly or through third parties, whether in person or via electronic means, pending the investigation and, if applicable, the hearing. When taking steps to separate the Complainant and the Respondent, the Title IX Coordinator, DOS, and/or CHRO will seek to minimize unnecessary or unreasonable burdens on either party. Note, however, that this obligation does not preclude the College from evaluating and implementing an interim suspension, if deemed warranted.
      13. Safety measures: The College may coordinate any reasonable arrangements that are necessary for ongoing safety. This includes parking arrangements, providing security escorts, or transportation assistance.
      14. Living arrangements: The College may assist in changing on-campus living arrangements, as available, for the Complainant or that of the Respondent to ensure safety and a comfortable living situation.
      15. Campus trespass order/restriction: The College may issue a trespass order which would prevent an individual from entering any part of campus. A campus restriction may also be imposed in order to restrict an individual from certain areas of campus, such as a residence hall (this can also include restrictions from College activities and/or events).
      16. Employment arrangements: The College may assist with altering work arrangements for employees, including changes in work schedule or job assignment.
      17. Academic arrangements/modifications: The College may assist with adjusting academic schedules, withdrawals, absence notifications, deadline extensions, and testing accommodations as well as assist in providing resources to academic support services.
      18. Other supportive measures: The College may coordinate reasonable arrangements to address the effects of Title IX complaints, including connections with counseling, health care, financial planning assistance, immigration and/or visa assistance, or academic support resources. Once the Title IX Coordinator receives a report, the Complainant and Respondent will be scheduled for separate meetings to review reporting options and supportive measures.
      19. Protective order: The College may provide law enforcement or victim services’ information in order to assist in filing for a protective order, restraining order, or similar lawful orders issued by a criminal, civil or tribal court. These orders prohibit contact between the Complainant and the Respondent.
      20. Any other actions deemed appropriate by the Title IX Coordinator
  9. Assistance.
    1. The following resources are available to the parties:
      1. National Sexual Assault Hotline (800) 656-4673
      2. National Teen Dating Abuse Hotline (866) 331-9474
      3. National Domestic Violence Hotline (800) 799-7233
      4. Georgia Crisis & Access Line (800) 715-4225
      5. Financial Aid Assistance, Director of Financial Aid (678) 407-5701
      6. Immigration and Visa Assistance, Director of Internationalization (678) 407-5300
      7. FACE (http://www.facecampusequality.org)
      8. SAVE (http://www.saveservices.org)
      9. Love is Respect (866) 331-9474, or text “loveis” to 77054
      10. GGC Counseling and Psychological Services (678) 407-5592
      11. GGC Health Services (678) 407-5675
      12. GGC Public Safety (678) 607-5333
      13. LiveSafe App
      14. Georgia Crisis and Access Line (800) 715-4225
      15. Northside Hospital Gwinnett (678) 312-1000
      16. Gwinnett Women’s Pavilion (678) 312-4790
      17. Mosaic Georgia: Sexual Assault Center and Children’s Advocacy Center  (770-476-7407)
      18. Gwinnett County Police  (770) 513-5100
      19. Lawrenceville Police (770) 963-2443
      20. Lawrenceville Health Center (770) 339-4283
    2. A complete list of all community resources and supportive measures are maintained on the College Title IX website: https://www.ggc.edu/equal-opportunity-and-title-ix-compliance/title-ix
VI. Advisors
  1. Both the alleged Complainant and Respondent, as parties to the matter, shall have the opportunity to use an Advisor (who may or may not be an attorney) of the party’s choosing at the party’s own expense for the express purpose of providing advice and counsel, pursuant to the provisions of BOR Policy Manual 4.6.5 Standards for Institutional Student Conduct Investigation and Disciplinary Proceedings and APM 12.1 Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment Policy. The Advisor may accompany the party to all meetings and may provide advice and counsel to their respective party throughout the Sexual Misconduct process, including providing questions, suggestions and guidance to the party, but may not actively participate in the process except as outlined in BOR Policy Manual 6.7.4 (E). All communication during the Sexual Misconduct process will be between the institution and the party and not the Advisor. The College is not obligated to communicate with or through Advisors, and will only communicate with the parties throughout the process.
  2. If a party does not have an Advisor for a hearing, the College will appoint a trained Advisor only for the limited purpose of conducting any cross-examination. The College cannot guarantee equal Advisory rights, meaning that if one party selects an Advisor who is an attorney, but the other party does not or cannot afford an attorney, the College is not obligated to provide an attorney. If the party does not wish to conduct cross examination, the party may waive their right to cross-examination; in which the College would not be required to appoint an Advisor.
VII. Informal Resolutions
  1. Parties have the option of informally resolving complaints of alleged Sexual Misconduct. For the Informal Resolution process to commence, however, both parties must agree to submit to the informal resolution process. The College has the discretion to determine whether an Informal Resolution process is appropriate.
  2. Participation by both the Complainant and the Respondent is voluntary and either party can request to end Informal Resolution and pursue an Investigation. Information gathered and utilized in the Informal Resolution process may be used in any other College process, including an Investigation under the Formal Resolution Process, if Informal Resolution ends.
  3. If the parties request and agree to an Informal Resolution, the Title IX office may conduct a short investigation of the matter; including meeting with the parties and collecting information relevant to the matter, but may not necessarily speak to any witnesses identified by either party.
  4. When the Parties mutually agree to resolve the matter, the College will determine if the Informal Resolution is appropriate. This review will be conducted by the Title IX Coordinator, in conjunction with either the Dean of Students or designee, or VP of Human Resources & Chief of Staff or designee.
  5. The College may consider the following factors to assess whether the Informal Resolution is appropriate:
    1. The parties’ amenability to the resolution;
    2. Likelihood of potential resolution, considering any power dynamics between the parties;
    3. The parties’ motivation to participate;
    4. Civility of the parties;
    5. Cleared violence risk assessment/ongoing risk analysis;
    6. Disciplinary history;
    7. Whether an emergency removal is needed;
    8. Complaint complexity;
    9. Emotional investment/intelligence of the parties;
    10. Rationality of the parties;
    11. Goals of the parties;
    12. Safety of the College Community.
  6. The Title IX Coordinator will draft an Informal Resolution Agreement and the agreement shall be signed by all parties, including the College. Both parties retain the right to end the Informal Resolution Process at any time prior to signing the Informal Resolution and to initiate the Formal Resolution Process.
  7. Either party’s failure to abide by the terms of the Information Resolution may result in appropriate responsive/disciplinary actions, including sanctions. Informal Resolutions are not appealable.
VIII. Acceptance of Responsibility for Sexual Misconduct Process

The Respondent may accept responsibility for the alleged policy violations at any point during the process. If the Respondent indicates an intent to accept responsibility for all of the alleged misconduct, any formal process will be paused, and the Title IX Coordinator will determine whether all parties and the College are able to agree on responsibility, sanctions, and/or remedies. If so, the Title IX Coordinator may implement the accepted finding that the Respondent is in violation of College policy and implement sanctions and/or remedies, in coordination with other appropriate administrator(s), as necessary. If the Respondent accepts Responsibility for prohibited conduct, the appropriate sanction or responsive actions shall be promptly implemented in order to effectively stop the sexual conduct, prevent its recurrence, and remedy the effects of the discriminatory conduct, both on the Complainant and the College community. Once the Respondent has accepted responsibility, and the College has implemented sanctions and/or remedies, the matter will be considered final and not appealable by either party. The Respondent’s failure to abide by the terms of the finalized sanctions and/or remedies, may result in appropriate responsive/disciplinary actions, including sanctions.

IX. Investigations

If the Title IX Coordinator determines that the conduct alleged could constitute Sexual Misconduct and the Complainant requests an Investigation, the Title IX Coordinator will assign an Investigator and the Investigator will commence a thorough, reliable, and impartial investigation.

X. Hearings, Possible Sanctions, and Appeals

All Sexual Misconduct hearings, sanctions, and appeals involving a Student Respondent, whether overseen by the College’s Title IX Coordinator or the System Director, shall follow the investigation process set forth in BOR’s Policy Manual 4.6.5 Standards for Institutional Student Conduct Investigation and Disciplinary Proceedings. All Sexual Misconduct adjudication involving an Employee Respondent shall be addressed utilizing the College’s employment policies and procedures including Human Resources Administrative Practice Manual (“HRAP”), Policy on Prohibit Discrimination & Harassment and shall include the minimal standards set forth in that HRAP policy.

XI. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures
Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 (Title IX)
Board of Regents Policy Manual 6.6 Non-Discrimination and Anti-Harassment
Board of Regents Policy Manual 6.7 Sexual Misconduct Policy
 
Appendix A - Federal Regulations Sexual Act Definitions

A “sexual act” is specifically defined by federal regulations to include one or more of the following:

Forcible Rape:

  • Penetration,

  • no matter how slight,

  • of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or

  • oral penetration by a sex organ of another person,

  • without the consent of the Complainant.

Forcible Sodomy:

  • Oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person,

  • forcibly,

  • and/or against that person’s will (non-consensually), or

  • not forcibly or against the person’s will in instances in which the Complainant is incapable of giving consent because of age or because of temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. 

Sexual Assault with an Object:

  • The use of an object or instrument to penetrate,

  • however slightly,

  • the genital or anal opening of the body of another person,

  • forcibly,

  • and/or against that person’s will (non-consensually),

  • or not forcibly or against the person’s will in instances in which the Complainant is incapable of giving consent because of age or because of temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity. 

Forcible Fondling:

  • The touching of the private body parts of another person (buttocks, groin, breasts),

  • for the purpose of sexual gratification,

  • forcibly,

  • and/or against that person’s will (non-consensually),

  • or not forcibly or against the person’s will in instances in which the Complainant is incapable of giving consent because of age or because of temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.

Incest:

  • Non-forcible sexual intercourse,

  • between persons who are related to each other,

  • within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by Georgia law. 

Statutory Rape:

  • Non-forcible sexual intercourse,

  • with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

  

Accomodations

Policy Number: 4.1.8
Effective Date: February 28, 2023
Revision History: February 8, 2018
Policy Contact: Director of Disability Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Georgia Gwinnett College complies with federal mandates to ensure non-discrimination based on disability as required in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title II of the Americans with Disability Act of 1990 (“ADA”).The Accommodations policy outlines the requirements that ensures compliance with the BOR Policy Manual 4.1.5 Students with Disabilities.

If GGC staff determine that a student qualifies for services under the interactive process of the ADA, GGC staff shall determine the appropriate accommodation which can include, but is not limited to, extended time on exams, distraction reduced testing room, notetaking services, books in alternative format, 24-hour extensions for homework, recording lectures, sign language interpreters etc. The process for providing the appropriate accommodation for a student with a demonstrated disability is a collaborative effort between Disability Services, the course instructor, and the student needing an accommodation.  

II. Scope

All students receiving accommodations under this policy, instructors, and staff are responsible for understanding and complying with this policy.

III. Compliance

An employee or course instructor’s failure to comply with the accommodations policy may result in a violation of the state or federal laws as well as GGC policies.

IV. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

BOR Academic and Student Affairs Handbook Appendix D: Disability Documentation
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 

 

 

Freedom of Expression

Policy Number: 4.1.9
Effective Date: May 7, 2024
Revision History: March 14, 2023; February 27, 2024 (minor change); May 1, 2017; February 28, 2017; May 26, 2016; June 4, 2015; May 28, 2013; May 12, 2012
Policy Contact: Associate Provost for Student Affairs

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC”) recognizes and upholds the rights protected by the First Amendment, including the rights of free speech and free expression, and the right to assemble peaceably. GGC also recognizes its responsibility to provide a secure learning environment that promotes the health, safety, and welfare of the College Community (as defined below) and allows members of the College Community to express their views in ways that do not disrupt the operation of the College. Members of the College Community are free to express their views, individually or in organized groups, on any topic, in all unrestricted outdoor areas of the GGC campus. Persons not affiliated with GGC are free to similarly express their views on any topic in the designated Public Forum Areas, as defined below. These expressions are subject to reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions as are necessary to promote campus safety, to ensure the proper functioning of the academic environment and institution activities, or to further other significant institutional interests. By placing reasonable limitations on time, place, and manner of speech, GGC does not take a position on the content or viewpoint of the expression, but allows for a diversity of viewpoints to be expressed. This policy does not restrict expressive activity by members of the College Community to the designated Public Forum Areas nor does it apply to College-sponsored activities or areas of campus that are not publicly accessible, such as classrooms, auditoriums, or athletic venues.  However, individuals may not engage in conduct that materially and substantially disrupts another’s expressive activity that is occurring in an unrestricted outdoor area of campus or a campus space reserved for that activity under the exclusive use or control of a particular group.

The opinions expressed by organizations, groups or individuals using GGC facilities do not necessarily reflect the position of GGC. The College affirms its commitment to freedom of speech, assembly, and expression even though the language or ideas of those seeking a venue for free expression may contradict the College’s ideals and policies or the personal views of GGC employees and students.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all members of the College Community and to all visitors to the GGC campus who are not members of the College Community.

III. Definitions

College Community: For purposes of this policy, the College Community means GGC students, faculty, staff, and their invited guests.

Expressive Activity or Expression: Communicative conduct or activity protected by the First Amendment, such as lawful, verbal, written, audio-visual or electronic expression by which individuals may communicate ideas to one another, including all forms of peaceful assembly, distributing literature, carrying signs, circulating petitions, demonstrations, protests, and speeches including those by guest speakers, marches, picketing, and the distribution of literature, as well as other forms of symbolic expressive activity, including banners; however, expressive activity does not include ordinary, day-to-day conversations among members of the campus community or commercial speech/activity.

Materially and Substantially Disrupt: When a person intentionally engages in conduct or expressive activity which the person knew or reasonably should have known would significantly hinder another person’s or group’s expressive activity, prevent the communication of the person’s or group’s message, or prevent the transaction of the business of a lawful meeting, gathering or procession by:

  1. Engaging in fighting, violent, or other unlawful behavior; or
  2. Physically blocking, using threats of violence, or creating loud or sustained noise or vocalization intended to prevent any person from attending, listening to, viewing, or otherwise participating in an expressive activity.

This does not include minor, brief, or fleeting nonviolent disruptions of events that are isolated and short in duration.

Unrestricted Outdoor Areas of Campus: Any outdoor areas of campus that are generally accessible to members of the College Community, including, but not limited to, grassy areas, plazas, seating areas, or other common areas, and does not include outdoor areas that are intended for specific uses or require special maintenance, nor does it include outdoor areas when and where access to members of the College Community is lawfully restricted.  Restricted outdoor areas include, but are not limited to, Intercollegiate Athletics facilities, and residence hall courtyards and patios.

IV. Expressive Activity on the GGC Campus
  1. Members of the College Community: Members of the College Community who plan to engage in expressive activity on campus may utilize all unrestricted outdoor areas of GGC as Public Forums Areas and reservations are not required. GGC recommends that College Community members engaging in planned expressive activity submit a formal reservation request to the Office of Student Integrity prior to the scheduled activity. Prior notice is requested to ensure that there are no scheduling conflicts and all interested users can be accommodated, that necessary College resources are existing for crowd control and security, and that the academic and other operations of the College are not disrupted. However, please note, reservations are not required. GGC reserves the right to direct individuals and/or groups to another available area of campus to ensure the safety of College Community members, to provide proper crowd control, and/or to limit disruption of the academic and other operations of GGC. GGC will not consider or impose restrictions based on the content or viewpoint of the expression when relocating or redirecting any expression.  
  2. Persons Who Are Not Members of the College Community: Individuals or groups of persons who are not members of the College Community may only engage in expressive activity on GGC’s campus in the designated Public Forum Areas after submitting a completed reservation request to the Office of Student Integrity at least two college business days prior to the scheduled expression and receiving approval in writing from a Student Affairs official pursuant to the procedures set forth in Section VI below. Organizers are encouraged to submit their requests as early in the planning stages of the event as possible. Reservations are required to ensure availability of space and for the safety of the campus and individuals who will be participating in the expressive activity. This provision does not apply to classroom instruction or College-sponsored events.
V. Designation of Public Forums on GGC’s Campus for Outside Individuals or Groups
  1. To better facilitate the free exchange of ideas, GGC has designated ZONE A and ZONE B as public forums on GGC’s campus (“Public Forum Area(s)”), which are depicted on the enclosed map. These Public Forum Areas are generally available from 9:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, provided that the Public Forum Areas have not previously been reserved.
  2. Though reservations to use the Public Forum Areas are only required as set forth in this policy, GGC recommends that all parties interested in utilizing the Public Forum Areas submit a completed Forum Reservation Request Form to GGC’s Office of Student Integrity in the Division of Academic and Student Affairs prior to use so that GGC may minimize scheduling conflicts, accommodate all interested users, and provide adequate security for the speaker and the audience.
VI. Reservations
  1. Submitting a Reservation.
    1. Completed Forum Reservation Request Forms should be submitted to GGC’s Office of Student Integrity in the Division of Academic and Student Affairs in person or by email to studentintegrity@ggc.edu. Any written materials that will be distributed in connection with the expression must be attached to the Forum Reservation Request Form and submitted to GGC’s Office of Student Integrity in the Division of Academic and Student Affairs at least two college business days prior to the distribution of the written materials.  College officials may not deny any request to distribute written materials based on the content or viewpoint of the expression. Reservations will only be processed on days that GGC’s Administrative Offices are open for business (“College business days”). No publicity for a speaker or program may be released prior to authorization of the Reservation Request Form.
    2. Reservation scheduling will be coordinated by a Student Affairs official, who will schedule forums for expression on a first-come, first-served basis. The Student Affairs official must respond to all requests in writing as soon as practicable, but in no event more than one College business day following receipt of the request, either authorizing the reservation and noting any special instructions, if applicable, or setting forth the reason for denial of the reservation. The Public Forum Area is not reserved until the requestor receives a confirmation from the Student Affairs official.
  2. Denial of Reservation.
    1. The Student Affairs official may only deny a reservation request for one of the following reasons:
      1. The Forum Reservation Request Form is not fully completed;
      2. The Forum Reservation Request Form contains a material falsehood or misrepresentation;
      3. The Public Forum Areas have been reserved by persons who previously submitted a completed Forum Reservation Request Form(s), in which case the College will work to provide a reservation for the applicant at an alternate location, alternate date, or alternate time;
      4. The use or activity intended by the applicant would conflict with or disturb previously planned programs organized and conducted by the College;
      5. The Public Forum Areas are not large enough to accommodate the expected or actual number of persons engaging in large group expression, in which case the College will work to provide a reservation for the applicant at an alternate location that can safely accommodate the applicant provided that the applicant is a member of the College Community and that such a location exists on GGC’s campus;
      6. The use or activity intended by the applicant would present a danger to the health or safety of the applicant, other members of the College Community, or the public; or
      7. The use or activity intended by the applicant is prohibited by law, Board of Regents’ policy, or GGC policy.
    2. When assessing a reservation request, the Student Affairs official must not consider or impose restrictions based on the content or viewpoint of the expression, including the possible reaction to the content or viewpoint anticipated to be expressed during the event.
  3. Appeals. Any denial of a reservation request in whole or in part may be appealed to GGC’s Associate Provost for Student Affairs in a writing setting forth the reasons why the appeal should be granted. The Associate Provost for Student Affairs (or designee) must decide all appeals within one College business day. The decision of the Associate Provost for Student Affairs (or designee) is final. 
  4. All campus reservations are subject to the general provisions below.
VII. General Provisions
  1. In addition to the requirements set forth above, all individuals participating in expressive activity on GGC’s campus must comply with the following guidelines and provisions:
    1. Promotion of Safety and Welfare. No interference with the free flow of vehicular or pedestrian traffic within and/or under the control of the GGC campus or the ingress and egress to buildings on campus is permitted. Expressive activity may not block the rights of other individuals to freely move around the campus. There must be no obstructions to and from buildings, no interference with other authorized and scheduled College activities, no impediments of passersby, or any disruptions of normal activities of the College. Safety and welfare also include concerns related to hazards, criminal behavior and unsanitary or unhealthy conditions. GGC Public Safety will make safety and welfare determinations based on a content and viewpoint neutral basis and may consult with the General Counsel or designee as needed. Events may not present a threat to public safety as determined by GGC Public Safety or another College official.
    2. Sound Amplification. Noise levels must be at a reasonable level so as not to impede instructional activities, administrative functions, or student and employee services. Use of items that are intended to amplify sounds, such as bullhorns, megaphones, microphones, speakers, audio enhancement devices, vocally amplified sound or other noise making instruments, should not be used unless approved in advance in writing by the Associate Provost of Student Affairs or designee. Upon receiving this request, the Associate Provost of Student Affairs or designee may consult with the Registrar’s Office and other departments on campus to assess potential impacts of the anticipated noise levels. Any use of pre-approved amplified sound, other than amplified sound used in connection with College-sponsored events, must only be intended to be heard in the immediate area of the expressive activity in order to minimize any disruption of the central academic mission of the College.  Use of amplified sound by student organizations is covered by the Outside Amplified Sound Provision of the Registered Student Organization Policy and Procedures Manual.
    3. College Equipment. Georgia Gwinnett College equipment will not be available for expressive activities, including assemblies, demonstrations, or protest activities.
    4. Respect for Other’s Expressive Rights. Expressive activities may not take place in a location that has already been reserved for another activity or event by an individual or organization. Protests in response to a speaker or event on campus are allowed, but such protests must not disrupt the speaker’s ability to communicate or the ability of others to hear the speaker. Protesters may not use physical force or intimidation to prevent others from expressing their views. Similarly, banners, posters, placards and/or other signage may not interfere with the ability of others to observe or view the expressive activity. Open flame devices and bonfires are prohibited. Items may not be affixed to permanent structures.
    5. Prohibition of Disruption. Expressive activities that substantially disrupt the function of GGC or interfere with the rights of others will not be allowed.  Disruption includes, but is not limited to, blocking entrances or exits to buildings, interfering with classes, and preventing others from carrying out their normal activities on campus. No interruption of the orderly conduct of college classes or other college activities is permitted.
    6. GGC Functions and Operations. Interruption of GGC’s instructional, educational, research, administrative, and other official functions and operations, including GGC ceremonies and events, is prohibited.
    7. Camping or Temporary Structures. Expressive activities that involve the use of temporary shelters (e.g., tent, boxes, etc.) or overnight activities are prohibited on GGC property unless prior written approval has been provided. This includes but is not limited to camping. Individuals who are not members of the GGC College Community may not camp or erect temporary structures (e.g. tents) on GGC’s campus.
    8. Commercial activities. No commercial solicitations, campus sales, or fundraising activities shall be undertaken which are not authorized by GGC. For GGC’s policies on solicitation and fundraising, refer to APM 7.61 and APM 8.2.54.
    9. Personal Responsibility. The individuals or groups engaging in expression are required to remove signs, placards, litter, and all other materials when the approved activity period ends.
    10. Respect for Property. Any activity that results in damage or destruction of property owned or operated by the College or property belonging to students, faculty, staff, or guests of the College is prohibited. Persons or organizations causing such damage may be held financially and/or criminally responsible; additionally, students may be subject to discipline in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct.
    11. Compliance with Applicable Laws and Policies. Individuals and groups of individuals expressing themselves on GGC’s campus must comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws; Board of Regents’ policies; and GGC policies, rules, and regulations.
  2. Authorization of a speech, event, or demonstration is contingent upon compliance with the criteria listed above. The College reserves the right to refuse to permit individuals or groups to assemble, demonstrate, protest, or otherwise express themselves in the designated Public Forum Areas if the individual or group refuses to abide by these administrative procedures and guidelines. Speakers or organizations failing to comply with the above policy may be asked to leave, a trespass warning may be issued, and/or College disciplinary action or judicial action may be pursued.
VIII. Freedom of Expression Policy Questions

Questions about this policy may be addressed to the Office of Student Integrity in the Division of Academic and Student Affairs at 678.407.5661 or studentintegrity@ggc.edu.

IX. Related Regulations, Statues, Policies, and Procedures

Board of Regents Policy Manual 6.5 Freedom of Expression
GGC Campus Map Public Forum Areas

 

Undergraduate Admissions

Policy Number: 4.2
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History:  August 1, 2019; May 26, 2016
Policy Contact:  Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

The purpose of this policy is to create admissions requirements that fulfill the stated mission of Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC”), by encouraging students of diverse levels of preparation, ethnicity, and age to enroll and develop their full potential. These requirements are in keeping with Georgia Gwinnett College’s strong commitment to student success. Georgia Gwinnett College complies with the access mission institution admission standards established under University System of Georgia (“USG”) Board of Regents policies and is committed to ensuring that the admissions procedures support these standards.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all applicants to GGC and to all GGC faculty, staff, and administrators with the authority to make or influence admission decisions.

III. Definitions

Applicant: A person who applies for admission to GGC.

Application: The process by which individuals apply to gain admission to GGC.

Freshman: Applicants who have never attended other colleges or who have earned fewer than 30 transferable semester hours from previous colleges.

Transfer: Applicants with 30 or more transfer hours of college credit

IV. General Admissions Requirements
  1. Admissions requirements are determined annually in conjunction with USG policy, the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Institutional Research/Chief Enrollment Management Officer (“VP for Enrollment Management”), and the President. The current admissions requirements and deadlines can be found on the GGC website. Several programs of study such as Nursing and Education have an additional application for program admission. Information on a particular degree program or major may be found on the Academic Degrees and Programs website.
  2. Admission Services reviews and evaluates applications and required documents submitted by applicants when the application file is complete and ready for review. An application file is considered complete when GGC Admissions Services has received the following:
    1. A completed application for admission to Georgia Gwinnett College submitted online with a nonrefundable application processing fee.
    2. Official high school and college transcripts from all colleges previously attended, regardless of transferable credit sent directly from those institutions through an approved electronic service or delivered in a sealed institutional envelope to GGC.
    3. Official test scores must be sent directly from the testing service to GGC for student types required to submit test scores for admission.
    4. Applicants who indicate that they have a criminal conviction or charges pending, or charged with disciplinary action or misconduct must provide supplemental information. Failure to provide this information may impact the applicant’s eligibility for admission.
  3. Application Deadlines. Application and document deadline dates may be moved to later dates in the year by the VP for Enrollment Management in consultation with others if conditions warrant. Any change in dates will be communicated to prospective students on the GGC website and in other communications through the admissions office. The deadline is the next business day if the deadline falls on the weekend.
  4. English Language Proficiency Requirement. All non-native speakers of English must demonstrate satisfactory English language proficiency as defined by the BOR Academic & Student Affairs Handbook Section 3.1.1.2
V. Freshman Requirements
  1. High School Diploma and Required High School Curriculum
    1. Freshmen must have a diploma from a high school accredited by a regional accrediting association (such as the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Council on Accreditation and School Improvement (“SACSCASI”)), or University System of Georgia recognized accrediting bodies or from a public school regulated by a school system and state department of education. Certificates of attendance or special education diplomas are not acceptable. High school students with a general diploma must have a minimum 2.00 grade point average calculated by GGC based on the grades in the 17 units of Required High School Curriculum (“RHSC”) as defined by the University System of Georgia Board of Regents.
    2. As part of the admission process, each student will be evaluated to determine satisfactory completion of the following 17 units of the University System of Georgia 3.1.1.1 Required High School Curriculum.
  2. Applicants with Fewer than 30 Transfer Hours of College Credit
    1. The college transcripts of students who have attended other colleges (but earned fewer than 30 semester hours of eligible transfer credit) will be considered as part of the admissions process. If a student meets the freshman requirements listed above and their cumulative combined GPA from previous college work is at or above a 2.00, the candidate will be admitted without condition; those who fail to meet both these requirements will be denied admission.
    2. An applicant who has fewer than 30 semester hours of college credit will be admitted on Academic Probation, if one of the following two conditions occur:
      1. The student meets the freshman admission requirements listed above but has a combined GPA from previous college work below a 2.00 or
      2. The student does not meet the freshman admission requirements listed above but has a combined GPA from previous college work above a 2.00. Furthermore, students will be required to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress as defined by their academic classification in order to be placed in good academic standing at Georgia Gwinnett College.
  3. Home School Applicants
    1. Applicants graduating from non-accredited home schools or high schools must meet the admission criteria required of other applicants and criteria set forth in the GGC Home School Portfolio.
    2. All home school and non-accredited high school applicants must demonstrate equivalent RHSC competence as required by Board of Regents policy.  Home school applicants who receive credit from accredited institutions and curriculum providers can demonstrate compliance by submitting official transcripts from these providers. These transcripts will be evaluated for RHSC completion based on the general RHSC requirements detailed in Freshman Requirements. 
    3. The Admissions Services Committee will review the GGC Home School portfolio for RHSC compliance, and at its sole discretion can recommend that an applicant has met some, all, or none of the RHSC requirements. Applicants who do not satisfy these requirements may still be admitted following an Admissions Appeal Committee review.
    4. Home School Portfolio Admissions Appeals Committee Review. The committee will review the applicant’s portfolio with the primary goal of determining the applicant’s potential for success at the college level. If the committee is not satisfied with the material submitted in the portfolio, it will seek additional information from the applicant for further admission review. If the committee’s review is not satisfactory, the applicant will be denied admission.  
VI. Transfer Requirements
  1. Admission Requirements for Transfer Students
    1. Applicants who have attended other colleges are required to submit an official transcript(s) from each college previously attended, regardless  of whether or not the applicant receives transfer credit. Documents must be sent directly from the sending institution to GGC’s Admissions Services office through an approved delivery method.
    2. Transfer applicants must present a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or above (based on a 4.00 scale) on all work attempted and must be in good academic standing at the last institution attended in order to be admitted to Georgia Gwinnett College in good academic standing. Transfer applicants with a GPA below 2.00 will be denied with the option to appeal their decision.
    3. Dismissals from Other Institutions. If an applicant has been permanently suspended from another institution, the Admissions Appeals Committee will process the application like any other transfer student who appeals the denial of admission to Georgia Gwinnett College. Any exceptions to this policy must be appealed to the VP for Enrollment Management.
  2. Transfer of Credit
    1. Evaluations of transfer credit are available for admitted students  by viewing  the Grizzly Den within  Banner.
    2. Credit earned from regionally accredited colleges may be transferred to Georgia Gwinnett College provided the course content is comparable to that of a course offered by Georgia Gwinnett College. Non-comparable courses that satisfy the guidelines of the University System of Georgia may also be transferred.
    3. Transfer students are required to earn a grade of “C” or better in all Area A requirements (ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102, MATH 1001, MATH 1101, MATH 1401, MATH 1111, or equivalents) in order for those courses to transfer to Georgia Gwinnett College. In addition, a grade of “C” or better is required in all courses used in Area F and in the major.
    4. The total number of combined hours through military experiences shall not exceed 15 semester hours. In order to determine military credit, the student must submit discharge paperwork (DD-214) or a military course transcript (Joint Services Transcript, AARTS, SMART, CCAF, etc.).
    5. Transfer credit from colleges and universities outside the United States must be evaluated by an approved, National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) evaluation service or InCred.  The applicant must submit transcripts to an evaluation service and request that an appropriate course by course evaluation be submitted to the office of Georgia Gwinnett College Admissions Services..
    6. Transfer students must complete requirements in United States History and Constitution as well as Georgia History and Constitution prior to graduation. Completion of American History and American Government at a previous University System of Georgia institution will transfer to Georgia Gwinnett College. Completion of American History and American Government at a non-University System of Georgia institution (including out-of-state institutions) will satisfy the U.S. History and Constitution requirement upon transfer, but not the Georgia History and Constitution requirement. A proficiency examination in these legislative requirements is available for the student to complete prior to graduation. See the Testing Center for additional information.
VII. Non-Traditional Students
  1. In order to make the University System of Georgia more accessible to citizens who are not of traditional college-going age and to encourage a higher proportion of Georgians to benefit from life-long learning, Georgia Gwinnett College is authorized by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia to admit non-traditional students. The number of non-traditional students GGC enrolls is not counted against the percent of limited admissions allowed by the Board of Regents at GGC.
  2. Non-Traditional Freshmen. Non-traditional freshmen are defined as individuals who meet all of the following criteria:
    1. Have been out of high school at least five (5) years and whose high school class graduated at least five (5) years ago;
    2. Hold a high school diploma from an accredited or approved high school as specified in the High School Diploma/Required High School Curriculum Section  of this Policy Manual or have satisfactorily completed the GED; and,
    3. Have earned fewer than 30 transferable semester credit hours.
  3. Admissions Services will make the decision on non-traditional applications without going to the Admissions Committee based on the following criteria:
    1. H.S. GPA of 2.0 or greater - regular admissions
    2. H.S. GPA between 2.0 and 1.50 - conditional admission up to 14 hours
    3. H.S. GPA less than 1.50 - applications still reviewed by the committee.
  4. All non-traditional freshmen will be evaluated for learning support status in English (reading/writing) and mathematics using GGC placement criteria.  In order to possibly avoid placement in Learning Support, applicants are encouraged to submit SAT/ACT scores if exam date is within seven years or Next-Gen Accuplacer scores for Write Placer, Reading Comprehension, and Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra and Statistics.
  5. Non-Traditional Transfers
    1. Non-traditional transfer students are defined as individuals who meet all of the following criteria:
      1. Have been out of high school at least five years or whose high school class graduated at least five (5) years ago; and,
      2. Have earned thirty (30) or more transferable hours of college credit.
    2. Placement evaluation for English and Mathematics will be  completed if students have not yet completed these requirements.
VIII. Immunization

All enrolled students must satisfy immunization verification requirements. For more details on document submission and specific immunizations required for enrollment, consult the the Health Services Immunization Requirement website.

IX. Lawful Presence Verification

Any student requesting to pay at the in-state tuition rate will be required to provide verification of their lawful presence in the United States in order to be classified as an in-state student or awarded an out-of-state tuition waiver as per Board of Regents Policy 4.3.4. A list of lawful presence verification methods can be found on the Proof of Lawful Presence GGC webpage.

X. Admission Appeals
  1. Any applicant denied admission to Georgia Gwinnett College may appeal the decision by submitting a written letter of appeal directly to the Admissions Appeals Committee. The Committee will review the appeal and academic history to determine the student’s potential for college-level academic work. Additional documentation may be required, including official test scores to support the applicant’s appeal. If an appeal is approved, the applicant will be admitted conditionally with a probationary status and must complete any prescribed conditions as specified by the Committee. If an appeal is denied, the decision of the Committee may be appealed to the VP for Enrollment Management.
  2. The letter of appeal must be typed and include the applicant’s electronic or handwritten signature, and it should be delivered to Admissions Services.
  3. The letter should provide details that will help the Committee make an informed decision to help the student achieve success at the College.  Such information may include:
    1. Reasons why the applicant’s previous academic work may have suffered
    2. How the applicant intends to perform better academically
    3. The applicant’s weekly work and/or family commitments
    4. Any other information the applicant would like the committee to consider
XI. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

BOR Policy Manual 4.2 Undergraduate Admissions
BOR Policy Manual 4.2.1.5 Transfer Requirements
BOR Policy Manual 4.2.1.8 Non-Traditional Requirements
GGC Admissions: Application Procedures
GGC Admissions: Proof of Lawful Presence Verification Methods
GGC Academic Degrees and Programs
GGC Home School Portfolio
University System of Georgia Recognized Accrediting Bodies
BOR Academic and Student Affairs Handbook 3.1.1.2 International Freshmen Requirements
USG English Proficiency Requirements
University System of Georgia RHSC Freshman Admission Requirements Document 

 

Dual Enrollment

Policy Number: 4.2.1
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History: August 2, 2019; February 10, 2017
Policy Contact: Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

The purpose of this policy is to create admissions requirements for eligible high school students that fulfill the stated mission of the College, by encouraging students of diverse levels of preparation, ethnicity, and age to enroll and develop their full potential. These requirements are in keeping with Georgia Gwinnett College’s strong commitment to student success. Georgia Gwinnett College complies with the access mission institution admission standards established under University System of Georgia Board of Regents policies and is committed to ensuring that the admissions procedures support these standards.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all high school student applicants to Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC”) and to all faculty, staff, and administrators with the authority to make or influence admission decisions.

III. Dual Enrollment

The dual enrollment program provides eligible high school students with the opportunity to take college courses to satisfy high school graduation or home study completion requirements while earning college credit.

IV. Admission Requirements
  1. Participants in the dual enrollment program must meet the Dual Enrollment Admission Requirements listed on the GGC Dual Enrollment Admission webpage.
  2. These requirements include the following:
    1. Be entering the junior or senior year of high school and be age 16 or older by the first day of the semester of enrollment.
    2. Submit a high school transcript showing student is on-track for completing all high school graduation requirements and the University System of Georgia Required High School Curriculum (“RHSC”).
    3. Meet the minimum high school grade point average (“GPA”) of 3.25 or higher, calculated by GGC on the 17-unit RHSC courses completed.  
    4. Test Scores.
      1. Effective spring 2023 and forward, meet the Dual Enrollment minimum admission test score criteria in either English or Math as follows:
        1. English: 500 SAT Evidence Based Reading and Writing; or 21 ACT English or Reading; or 237 Next-Gen Accuplacer Reading Comprehension and 4 WritePlacer.
        2. Math: 510 SAT Math; or 20 ACT Math; or 266 Next-Gen Accuplacer Quantitative Reasoning Algebra and Statistics.
      2. Effective spring 2023 and forward, present test score(s) to exempt at least one area (English or Math) corequisite Learning Support for course placement.
    5. Submit Parent/guardian consent agreement and funding application via the Georgia Student Finance Commission’s (GSFC) Dual Enrollment Funding Application. The approved funding application is required for enrollment.
    6. Homeschool Students. Homeschooled students may be considered if they are enrolled in Non-traditional Educational Centers that are recognized by GAPSAC or by state departments of education. Students attending non-accredited home school programs or non-accredited high schools must submit a GGC Home School Portfolio for admission eligibility review.   
    7. Take courses from the GSFC approved courses directory for approved course placement:
      1. Effective spring 2023 and forward, course placement is as follows:
        1. Students exempting placement in Learning Support English but not math may enroll in approved non-STEM courses only.
        2. Students exempting placement in Learning Support Math but not in English may enroll in approved STEM courses only.
        3. Students exempting placement in both English and Math Learning Support may enroll in approved STEM and non-STEM courses.
        4. High School Algebra II, Advanced Algebra, or equivalent course is a prerequisite for any Dual Enrollment math course.
      2. Students can exempt Learning Support placement in second area after admissions.
V. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures
BOR 4.2.1 Dual Enrollment Requirements
GGC Home School Portfolio
Georgia Gwinnett College Dual Enrollment Admission
Georgia Student Finance Commission’s (GSFC) Dual Enrollment Funding Application
Georgia Finance Commissions (GSFC) Approved Courses Directory 
 

International Students

Policy Number: 4.2.1.7
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History: August 1, 2018; May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Associate Director of International Student Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

The purpose of this policy is to create admissions requirements that fulfill the stated mission of the College, by encouraging students of diverse levels of preparation, ethnicity, and age to enroll and develop their full potential. These requirements are in keeping with Georgia Gwinnett College’s strong commitment to student success. Georgia Gwinnett College complies with the access mission institution admission standards established under University System of Georgia Board of Regents policies and is committed to ensuring that the admissions procedures support these standards.  The policy sets admission, financial, and health insurance requirements for international students.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all international applicants to Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC”) and to all GGC faculty, staff, and administrators with the authority to make or influence admission decisions regarding international applicants.

III. Definitions

International student: At GGC, an international student is an individual who meets one of the following criteria:

  1. Currently living outside the U.S. and will require an F-1 or a J-1 visa to study in the U.S.
  2. Not a U.S. Citizen or a Lawful Permanent Resident (“LPR”) and is currently in the U.S. on an F-1 visa.
  3. Currently in the U.S. on another non-immigrant visa classification which permits part-time or full-time study
IV. Admission of Degree-Seeking International Students
  1. International Freshman Requirements
    1. Freshman applicants educated outside of the United States shall demonstrate academic preparation comparable to that required of applicants completing high school within the United States.
    2. English Language Proficiency Requirement.
      1. Completion of a test of English language proficiency is required of all applicants. Please refer to the USG English proficiency chart for approved exams and minimum standards or some other USG-approved evaluation of English. GGC’s minimum required English proficiency scores are as follows: TOEFL IBT 69, IELTS 6, SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing Section Score 480, ACT English 17, or Accuplacer Reading Comprehension 237 and WritePlacer 4.
      2. For a full list of approved exams and minimum standards, see BOR Academic and Student Affairs Handbook 3.1.1.2 International Freshman Requirements.
    3. Foreign Credentials. Students must submit official records from secondary school and all college(s) attended. Transcripts from foreign institutions must be evaluated by a NACES-approved evaluation service such as Josef Silny and Associates; World Education Services; or Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc. or other BOR-approved internal/external services.  Students must submit transcripts to an evaluation service and request that an appropriate evaluation with GPA be submitted directly to Georgia Gwinnett College, International Student Services. A minimum 2.00 Grade Point Average is required. In lieu of GPA, freshman applicants may submit SAT, ACT, or Accuplacer scores.
    4. Some non-postsecondary credit and/or examinations may be considered for college credit and may require a course-by-course evaluation for college level credit to be awarded.
  2. Transfer Students
    1. Applicants who have earned 30 or more transferable semester hours from a regionally accredited college or university are classified as transfer students. Students admitted from other colleges are required to meet all general requirements and application deadlines. See GGC Transfer Admission.
    2. Transfer students who are non-native speakers of English and who transfer from an institution of higher education outside the U.S. where English was not the language of instruction must submit proof of English proficiency as listed in the BOR Academic and Student Affairs Handbook section 3.1.1.6 International Transfer Requirements. Foreign credentials must be evaluated through an approved evaluation service.
V. Financial Requirements
  1. International students requesting the Form I-20 or DS-2019 from Georgia Gwinnett College must provide documentation showing sufficient resources to cover tuition, room and board, health insurance, and other living expenses.
  2. In accordance with the payment policy of the College, students agree to pay all tuition and fees when due to Georgia Gwinnett College (including, but not limited to, tuition, mandatory student fees, and College Housing fees). Failure to pay a student account in full by the published deadline may result in a student being dropped from classes, which could jeopardize the student’s ability to maintain valid immigration status.
VI. Health Insurance
  1. International students holding F or J visas are required to have student health insurance that meets the minimum standards set by the University System of Georgia.
  2. Students in these categories who are not covered by a policy held by a parent, spouse, employer, or if the policy does not meet the minimum standards, will be charged for a USG Student Health Insurance Plan (“SHIP”) policy.
    1. Students who are already covered by an insurance policy (i.e., through parent plans, family plans or employer-sponsored plans) can opt out of the plan. Once the information has been verified, the requirement for SHIP health insurance will be waived and the moneys paid to Georgia Gwinnett College for insurance will be refunded. Students must apply for the waiver each semester for which they are enrolled in classes, and this must be done during the waiver period.
    2. Students who do not apply for and receive the waivers during the enrollment period will be responsible for the insurance fees. Students who fail to submit comparable health insurance information by the end of the waiver period will automatically be enrolled in the SHIP insurance plan.
  3. Students should not purchase insurance from their home country until they have reviewed information on the insurance waiver policy and are sure they will qualify for a waiver. Students should verify that the insurance policy they are considering meets the waiver minimums before they purchase it. Additional information is available through this website.
VII. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

University System of Georgia International Student Resources, Handbooks, and Forms

 

J-Visa Students

[NOTE: The letter “J” has always been used with the term “J-Visa.”]
Policy Number:
4.2.1.7.3.1
Effective Date: February 28, 2023
Revision History: August 1, 2018; May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Director of Internationalization

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Georgia Gwinnett College is a designated exchange program (or J-1) visa sponsor. As such, GGC may host exchange (or J-1) visa students.

II. Scope

The policy applies to exchange students and is implemented primarily by the staff of the Office of Internationalization. The staffs of Admission, Enrollment Management, and the English Language Institute should also be familiar with it.

III. Compliance
  1. Students who have J-1 sponsorship through an outside agency such as the Institute of International Education (“IIE”) or International Student Exchange Programs (“ISEP”) may enroll as non-degree-seeking students at GGC for the length of the program.
  2. Admission criteria and program length for these types of special programs will be established between the Office of Internationalization and the sponsoring agency.

 

 

 

Admission Requirements Exceptions

Policy Number: 4.2.2
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History: August 2, 2019; February 10, 2017
Policy Contact:  Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

The purpose of this policy is to provide an alternate evaluation process for admissions requirements that fulfill the stated mission of the College, by encouraging students of diverse levels of preparation, ethnicity, and age to enroll and develop their full potential. These requirements are in keeping with Georgia Gwinnett College’s strong commitment to student success. Georgia Gwinnett College complies with the access mission institution admission standards established under University System of Georgia Board of Regents policies and is committed to ensuring that the admissions procedures support these standards.

II.Scope

This policy applies to all applicants to Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC”) and to all GGC faculty, staff, and administrators with the authority to make or influence admissions decisions.

III. Limited Admissions Category
  1. In recognition of the fact that a limited number of students do not meet established standards but do demonstrate special potential for success, GGC grants admission to a limited number of such students. Multiple measures are used whenever possible, such as interviews, portfolios, and records of experiential achievements, for students being considered for Limited Admission. The number of students who may be granted Limited Admissions is restricted and cannot exceed 33%  of the institution’s annual first-time freshman headcount enrollment.
  2. Students who enter under the Limited Admissions category (including Presidential Exceptions as described below) must make up any Required High School Curriculum unit deficiencies in accordance with University System of Georgia procedures. They must also be screened, as applicable, for placement in Learning Support courses based on their standardized test scores and must meet University System of Georgia criteria for exemption or exit of Learning Support in reading, English, and mathematics. If no test scores are provided, the student will automatically default into the English and Math Learning Support courses.
  3. Presidential Exceptions. The President of GGC is authorized by the University System of Georgia Board of Regents to grant Presidential Exceptions to the Required High School Curriculum units and requirements for Limited Admissions if the student shows promise for academic success in college and has at least a high school diploma or General Educational Development (“GED”), Test Assessing Secondary Completion (“TASC”), or High School Equivalency Test (“HiSET”) approved by the Board of Regents. College officials are required to report to the University System of Georgia chief academic officer on those students granted Presidential Exceptions. Presidential Exceptions must be included as part of GGC’s maximum percentage for Limited Admissions.
IV. General Educational Development (“GED”), Test Assessing Secondary Completion (“TASC”), and High Equivalency Test (“HiSET”)
  1. Persons over 18 years of age (or whose class has already graduated from high school) whose secondary schooling was interrupted may be admitted by presenting the GED, TASC, or the HiSET and other approved high school equivalency. test Official GED, TASC, and HiSET transcripts must be mailed directly from the Testing Service to the Georgia Gwinnett College Admissions Office.
  2. GED, TASC, and HiSET applicants are  encouraged to submit College Board Scholastic Assessment Test (“SAT”) scores, American College Test (“ACT”) scores, or Next-Gen Accuplacer scores for course placement consideration. If standardized test scores are not submitted for placement consideration, the student’s course placement will automatically default to English and Math Learning Support.
  3. GED, TASC, and HiSET applications may be reviewed by the Admissions Committee, and an interview with the candidate may be required. In addition, all GED, TASC, and HiSET applicants must meet the regular freshman admissions requirements. 
V. Addressing Required High School Curriculum (“RHSC”) Deficiencies
  1. Students with RHSC deficiencies are required to satisfy those deficiencies using one of the following methods:
    1. Address Deficiency Prior to Enrollment
      1. Applicants, including those coming from other states, who have RHSC deficiencies but can demonstrate competency in the deficient area(s) will be deemed as meeting the RHSC requirements. If these students meet all other requirements for regular admission, GGC is not required to admit them under the Limited Admissions category.
      2. A student can satisfy any RHSC deficiency by demonstrating competency in the subject matter area(s) considered deficient or by addressing the deficiency through an appropriate course successfully completed prior to enrollment at another institution.
      3. Option 1: Demonstrate Subject Matter Proficiency through Approved Standardized Tests
        1. A student may demonstrate competency through standardized examinations such as the SAT, ACT, College Level Examination Program (“CLEP”), DANTES Subject Standardized Tests (“DSST”), Next-Gen Accuplacer, or other comparable examinations approved by the BOR.
        2. Students must complete four Board of Regents-approved science units, including two units with a laboratory component, as outlined in the Staying on Course document. Additionally, Georgia public high school students are required to complete coursework in four areas of science (see “Required High School Curriculum” for science in the previous section).  Students with a science deficiency may address the deficiency prior to enrollment through a standardized examination provided the examination demonstrates competency in an area not already reflected in their high school coursework.
        3. A student whose SAT or ACT score in the deficient area is at or above the average SAT or ACT score of the previous year’s fall semester first-time freshmen admitted to GGC indicates competency in the area.
        4. A student may use the following SAT Subject Tests to demonstrate competency in a deficient area: English, Writing, Literature, Foreign Languages, Math Level 1 or Math Level 2, American History and Social Studies, World History, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Students may use SAT Subject Tests to demonstrate exposure and competencies for areas not reflected in their course work.
        5. A student may use the CLEP and DSST subject examination to demonstrate competency in a deficient area.
        6. Students with an English deficiency who are placed into co-requisite English will satisfy the deficiency upon successfully exiting Learning Support English. Students with a mathematics deficiency who are placed into co-requisite mathematics will satisfy the deficiency upon successfully exiting co-requisite mathematics.
      4. Option 2: Demonstrate Subject Matter Proficiency Through Approved Coursework.
        1. A student may address the deficiency prior to enrollment by taking a USG-approved high school course in the deficiency area(s) or a three-credit collegiate course (with a course grade of “C” or better) in the appropriate subject area(s). A student who has taken a terminal course in a subject area (for example, a student who has completed calculus in the eleventh grade) will be deemed as meeting the RHSC requirement in that subject area.
    2. Address Deficiency After Enrollment
      1. Students who have RHSC deficiencies that are addressed after enrollment can be admitted under the Limited Admissions category.
      2. Students who have RHSC deficiencies and who successfully complete collegiate courses addressing all of their deficiencies within their first 30 credit hours will be considered as having satisfied the deficiency or deficiencies. These students will receive collegiate credit that can count towards the student’s degree program. If a student does not address the deficiencies within the first 30 credit hours, then the student may not register for other courses, unless they also register for the appropriate deficiency course or courses. Successful completion (“C” or better) of a three-credit collegiate course in the appropriate subject area demonstrates collegiate-level preparedness and is sufficient for satisfying an RHSC deficiency in that subject area.
VI. Persons 62 and Over Program
  1. Persons 62 years of age or older may be admitted to GGC to take courses on a space available basis at little to no cost. To be eligible for GGC enrollment in the program, applicants:
    1. Must be residents of Georgia, 62 years of age or older at the time of registration, and shall present a birth certificate or other comparable written documentation of age to enable the institution to determine eligibility.
    2. May enroll as a regular or auditing student in courses offered for resident credit on a “space available” basis without payment of fees, except for supplies, laboratory, or shop fees.
    3. Will meet all University System of Georgia and institution undergraduate or graduate admission requirements; however, GGC officials may exercise discretion in exceptional cases where circumstances indicate that certain requirements such as high school graduation and minimum test scores are inappropriate. In instances involving discretionary admission, GGC staff will provide diagnostic methods to determine whether or not participation in Learning Support will be required prior to enrollment in regular credit courses. Reasonable prerequisites may be required in certain courses.
    4. Must meet all GGC and legislated degree requirements if they are degree-seeking students.
VII. Admission Requirements for Undergraduate Programs Not Leading to the Baccalaureate Degree
  1. Admission of Non-Degree Students. Georgia Gwinnett College will not allow students to apply under this status, but will permit the Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Services to allow students to be admitted under this category on an as needed basis. Students may be permitted to enroll as non-degree students for a maximum of 18 semester credit hours, including institutional credit. Students may not enroll in any course for which there is a learning support prerequisite unless they have been screened for and have exempted the relevant learning support course. ESL coursework does not count towards the 18 semester hour limit.
  2. Admission of Postbaccalaureate Students. Students who have earned the baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution may enroll as non-degree students in courses with no limitation on the number of hours of undergraduate credit these students can earn. Postbaccalaureate applicants must provide an official transcript reflecting the appropriate baccalaureate degree.
  3. Admission of Auditors. Students who submit evidence of graduation from a high school, as specified in the undergraduate admissions policy, or a GED, TASC, and HiSET transcript approved by the Board of Regents may register to audit a course as space in the course permits. Under extraordinary circumstances, the President may waive the requirement of high school diploma or equivalent. Students registered as auditors shall be required to pay the regular tuition and fees for enrollment.
VIII. Admission of Transient Students
  1. Transient Students from Other Institutions. A student enrolled in a degree program at another accredited college or university may apply to Georgia Gwinnett College for transient status. Such a student is one who expects to return to the college or university where currently or previously enrolled and must have the permission of the home institution to attend Georgia Gwinnett College. The applicant who desires transient status must submit an application for admission and transient permission form from the home institution and must be in good academic standing at their home institution. Transient students are admitted on a semester basis only. Georgia Gwinnett College does not guarantee that a transient student will be able to secure the courses desired, nor is Georgia Gwinnett College responsible for advising a transient student of courses that are applicable to their program of study at the home institution. Transcripts are not automatically forwarded to the home institution. Transient students must submit a written request to have a transcript sent back to the home institution.
  2. Georgia Gwinnett College Students Enrolling at Other Institutions as Transient Students
    1. A Georgia Gwinnett College student who wishes to take a course at another institution must complete an application for admission to the transient institution. Transient enrollment requires approval by both institutions, and it is the student’s responsibility to comply with that college’s standards and application deadlines. Georgia Gwinnett College students seeking transient approval should coordinate the process with his/her academic advisor and  Registration Services. Students who seek transient status must obtain approval from the appropriate dean.
    2. Georgia Gwinnett College students may request to be a transient student at other institutions provided that the courses they seek to take at another institution fall into one of the following categories:
      1. The course(s) which the student is requesting to take is/are not offered at Georgia Gwinnett College during the semester in which the student desires to take the course(s).
      2. The course(s) which the student is requesting to take is/are closed due to full enrollment during the semester in which the student desires to take the course(s).
    3. Students also must complete the Request for Transient Permission. This form is valid for one term of enrollment only. In order to receive transient permission, it is the student’s responsibility to:
      1. Be currently enrolled at Georgia Gwinnett College as a degree-seeking student.
      2. Be in good academic standing.
      3. Have completed all Learning Support and/or English for Academic Purposes requirements.
      4. Have completed all Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) requirements.
    4. In order to receive transfer credit at Georgia Gwinnett College for the specified courses, it is the responsibility of the student to:
      1. Enroll in courses appropriate to his/her major at the proper level and in the proper sequence.
      2. Complete the courses with a grade of “C” or better. Grades obtained in courses taken as a transient student will be calculated in the student’s cumulative GPA at Georgia Gwinnett College.
      3. Have an official transcript of transient courses sent to the following address at the end of the transient term: Georgia Gwinnett College, Enrollment Management Office
    5. Students receiving HOPE scholarship or Veteran’s Affairs Benefits must coordinate payment details with the financial aid offices at both Georgia Gwinnett College and the transient institution.
IX. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

BOR 4.2.1.3 Exceptions to Freshman Requirements
BOR Academic and Student Affairs Handbook 3.1.1.3 Exceptions to Freshman Requirements
BOR 4.2.1.9 Persons Aged 62 and Over Program
BOR 4.2.2.2 Admission of Non-Degree Students
BOR 4.2.2.3 Admission of Postbaccalaureate Students

BOR 4.2.2.5 Admission of Auditors
BOR 4.2.2.4 Admission of Transient Students
 

 

Right to Refuse Admission

Policy Number: 4.2.3.3
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC”) adheres to Board of Regents Policy Manual 4.2.3.3 Right to Refuse Admission. In accordance with this policy, GGC reserves the right to refuse admission to:

  1. A non-resident of Georgia;
  2. An applicant whose admission would cause GGC to exceed its maximum capacity;
  3. An applicant whose request for admission is only to a program that is already filled;
  4. An applicant whose transcript is from an unaccredited institution; or
  5. An applicant who is otherwise ineligible for admission.
II. Scope

This policy applies to all applicants to GGC and to all GGC faculty, staff, and administrators with the authority to make or influence admission decisions.

 

 

 

 

Social Security Numbers

Policy Number: 4.2.3.5
Effective Date: February 28, 2023
Revision History: Reviewed May 26, 2016

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

GGC adheres to Board of Regents Policy Manual 6.12 Social Security Numbers.

II. Scope

All members of the GGC community should be aware of and comply with this policy.  

 

Good Standing

Policy Number: 4.2.4
Effective Date: February 27, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Students in Good Standing with the College may hold office in any College club or organization, and participate in athletics. Students not in Good Standing with the College, who wish to appeal holding office in any College club, organization, or participation in athletics, must submit their appeal through the Student Complaint Process.

II. Scope

All GGC staff, faculty and students should be familiar with this policy. 

III. Definitions

Good Standing: Students are considered to be in Good Standing with the College if they are eligible to enroll in classes and are not on Academic or Conduct Probation.

 

4.2.5 Academic Standing

Classification of Students

Policy Number: 4.2.5.1
Effective Date: February 27, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Class designation is generally based on the number of hours the student has earned in courses offered at Georgia Gwinnett College or transferred from other educational institutions. Class designation does not necessarily reflect the students’ readiness to graduate or progress in their chosen program of study.

II. Scope

All GGC staff, faculty and students should be familiar with this policy. 

III. Definitions

The following is a general explanation of class designation:

Freshman: A student who has earned fewer than 30 hours of credit.
Sophomore: A student who has earned 30 to 59 hours of credit.
Junior: A student who has earned 60 to 89 hours of credit.
Senior: A student who has earned 90 or more hours of credit.

 

Good Academic Standing

Policy Number: 4.2.5.2
Effective Date: February 27, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

A student is in good academic standing if their cumulative Georgia Gwinnett College grade point average is at or above the Minimum Cumulative Georgia Gwinnett College Grade Point Average for the number of semester hours attempted plus transfer hours.

II. Scope

All GGC staff, faculty and students should be familiar with this policy. 

III. Compliance

All students attending Georgia Gwinnett College are expected to maintain certain academic standards that are outlined in the table below.

Semester Hours Attempted
(Including Transfer Hours)
Minimum Cumulative
GGC GPA
0-15 1.50
16-30 1.60
31-45 1.80
45 or more 2.00
 

Academic Warning

Policy Number: 4.2.5.3
Effective Date: February 27, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

If a student in Good Academic Standing fails to maintain the appropriate Minimum Cumulative Georgia Gwinnett College GPA, as outlined in APM 4.2.5.2, they will be placed on Academic Warning.

II. Scope

All GGC staff, faculty and students should be familiar with this policy. 

III. Compliance
  1. The student will receive a written notice alerting them that a continued deterioration in academic performance will result in Academic Probation.
  2. The student will also be required to meet with their advisor to implement a plan for improvement before registering for the subsequent semester as a way to promote academic progress and student success.
  3. Students will have one semester to raise their GPA to the appropriate Minimum Cumulative Georgia Gwinnett College GPA and return to Good Academic Standing.
 

Academic Probation

Policy Number: 4.2.5.4
Effective Date: February 27, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Students will be placed on Academic Probation if they fail to achieve the appropriate Minimum Cumulative Georgia Gwinnett College GPA, as outlined in 4.2.5.2 Good Academic Standing , for two consecutive semesters.

II. Scope

All GGC staff, faculty and students should be familiar with this policy. 

III. Compliance
  1. A student on Academic Probation will be restricted to a maximum of 14 semester hours of coursework in the subsequent semester of enrollment and may not represent the college in any official capacity (student organizations, athletics, etc.).
  2. Students on Academic Probation may also be subject to a loss of certain financial aid funds and should check with the Financial Aid Office regarding Satisfactory Academic Progress regulations for Financial Aid.
  3. Students will remove themselves from probation by raising their GPA to the appropriate Minimum Cumulative Georgia Gwinnett College GPA.
  4. Students who earn at least a 2.0 GPA during any semester in which they are on Academic Probation, but do not raise their Georgia Gwinnett College-cumulative GPA sufficiently to be removed from probation, will continue on Academic Probation (Continued Probation) and thereby avoid Academic Suspension.
 

Academic Suspension

Policy Number: 4.2.5.5
Effective Date: February 27, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

A student who fails to a) remove themselves from Academic Probation or b) meet the requirements of Continued Probation, as outlined in APM 4.2.5.4 Academic Probation , will be placed on Academic Suspension.

II. Scope

All GGC staff, faculty and students should be familiar with this policy. 

III. Compliance
  1. A student on Academic Suspension will be prohibited from taking courses or participating in college-related activities for the subsequent semester (excluding the entire summer term).
  2. After this absence, the student may apply for re-admission to the college through the Admissions Committee.
  3. Students readmitted following an Academic Suspension are placed on Academic Probation and are subject to the cumulative GPA requirement, listed in APM 4.2.5.4 Academic Probation .
  4. Any exceptions to this policy must be appealed to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.
 

Academic Dismissal

Policy Number: 4.2.5.6
Effective Date: February 27, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Students are placed on Academic Probation when returning to the college after Academic Suspension. If a student fails either to remove themselves from this status or to meet the requirements of Continued Probation will face Academic Dismissal.

II. Scope

All GGC staff, faculty and students should be familiar with this policy. 

III. Compliance
  1. A student on Academic Dismissal will be prohibited from taking courses or participating in college-related activities for one calendar year from the end of the semester in which the dismissal occurred, after which the student may apply for re-admission to the college using the procedures followed by any new student.
  2. Students readmitted following an Academic Dismissal are placed on Academic Probation and are subject to the cumulative grade point average requirement listed in APM 4.2.5.2 Good Academic Standing .
  3. Students who receive a second Academic Dismissal will not be eligible for readmission to Georgia Gwinnett College.
  4. Any exceptions to this policy must be appealed to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.
  5. If a student has been permanently suspended from another institution, the Admissions Committee will process the student like any other transfer student who appeals the denial of admission to Georgia Gwinnett College. Any exceptions to this policy must be appealed to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.
 

Readmission

Policy Number: 4.2.5.7
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision Date: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

The purpose of this policy is to establish and communicate the readmission requirements and potential outcomes with applying for admission to Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC”).

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC students and to all GGC faculty, staff, and administrators with the authority to make or influence admission decisions.

III. Compliance

Students who have not been enrolled for 12 consecutive months (3 terms) as well as students changing classification are required to apply for readmission. Transient students are required to apply for each semester of enrollment. If the student does not enroll, the process must be repeated. The application for readmission is online. The readmission application must be submitted along with the non-refundable processing fee and any required supporting credentials by the deadline for the term of the desired re-enrollment.

IV. Related Regulations, Statues, Policies, and Procedures

GGC Admissions - Re-admission to GGC

 

Georgia Gwinnett College’s Residence Requirement

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The following residence policy applies to those that apply to GGC after September 1, 2013. Those that apply to GGC prior to September 1, 2013 are exempt from this policy.

Georgia Gwinnett College has established a residence policy for freshmen and transfer students who transfer in less than 30 semester hours. This policy requires such students to live in campus housing. In addition, this policy is designed to enrich your education, assist in fostering relationships on campus with other students, faculty and staff, and enhance your academic success.

The campus residence requirement does not apply to you if you:

  • Live with and commute daily from the legal residence of your parent(s), grandparent(s), or legal guardian, within Gwinnett County or one of the neighboring counties: DeKalb, Walton, Hall, Fulton, Forsyth, Barrow, Rockdale, Newton, Cobb, Henry, Clayton, and Jackson; or
  • Have active military status.

You may be exempt from the campus residence requirement if:

  • You reach the age of 21 prior to the first day of classes of your first term of enrollment,
  • You are married, divorced, have legal dependents or are the sole caregiver,
  • You can show independent financial status, or
  • You have demonstrated unique hardship.

Any request for an exemption must be made to the Student Appeals Committee via the online appeals form. at least one month prior to the start of the semester in which you intend to enroll. Each request must be fully documented, reviewed and is subject to approval at the sole discretion of the College.

 

Rescission of Admission

Policy Number: 4.2.7
Effective Date: March 14, 2023 
Revision History: December 17, 2018
Policy Contact: Vice President for Enrollment Management and Institutional Research/Chief Enrollment Management Officer

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

The purpose of the policy is to describe the authorities under which the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Institutional Research/Chief Enrollment Management Officer may rescind the admission or enrollment of any student or potential student.

II. Scope

This policy applies to faculty, staff, administrators, students, and potential students of Georgia Gwinnett College.

III. Definitions

Enrollment: For the sole purpose of APM 4.2.7, “enrollment” shall be considered as occurring at the time of the first day of class for which the student is registered.

Student: A person who has been admitted, or is enrolled at GGC.

IV. Rescission of Admission

GGC reserves the right in its sole discretion to rescind any notice of acceptance or admission and/or any enrollment of any student at any time for submission of false information and/or failure of the individual to disclose information requested on an application for admission. The student/applicant shall be afforded that due process to which they may be entitled to under the law.

 

Background Review for Admissions and Housing Applications

Policy Number: 4.2.8
Effective Date: April 18, 2023
Revision History: August 2, 2019; May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

The purpose of this policy is to establish and communicate the requirements and potential outcomes with applying for admission and/or housing as a result of an applicant background review.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all applicants to Georgia Gwinnett College and faculty, staff, and administrators are expected to adhere to this policy.

III. Definitions

Business day: Any week day the College is open and the non-essential staff is required to work.

IV. Right to Deny or Conditionally Admit
  1. Georgia Gwinnett College specifically reserves the right to deny or conditionally admit any applicant for admission or housing as a result of an applicant background review. Denial of admission to the College shall also result in denial of GGC housing. Denial of housing shall not necessarily result in denial of admission to the College. Other criteria may be used by the College to deny or conditionally admit any applicant or provide housing to any applicant as set forth in BOR Policy Manual 4.2 Undergraduate Admissions and APM 4.2 Undergraduate Admissions.
  2. Applications for admissions and applications for housing may be considered separately or together. Any criteria and/or conditions for admissions and/or housing may be identical for both admissions and housing or may be different for admissions than those established for housing.
  3. An applicant to the College or to housing is required to disclose the following:
    1. Criminal convictions
    2. Pending criminal charges
    3. Disciplinary actions
    4. Suspension or expulsion from any high school or college
  4. Failure to disclose these circumstances by an applicant may result in denial of admission. Failure to disclose these circumstances by a currently enrolled GGC student may result in disciplinary action, up to and including expulsion from the College or College housing.
  5. If a student or housing applicant is subject to a GGC student integrity matter, the student/applicant will be on probation as to admissions and/or housing until all student integrity conditions are satisfied. The student or applicant may still be placed on probation for matters unrelated to GGC integrity matter(s).
V. Admissions Applications
  1. When an applicant discloses any criminal conviction, pending criminal charge, disciplinary action, or suspension or expulsion, the Office of Enrollment Management Services will send a letter to the applicant requesting supplemental information and/or documentation to explain the nature of the matter(s) involved.
    1. The letter to the applicant will indicate that the supplemental information is needed before the application can move forward through the admissions process and must be submitted within 30 calendar days of the date of the letter. If the applicant needs more than 30 calendar days to assemble the supplemental information, then the applicant must submit a request in writing for an extension of time.
    2. The information to be submitted by the applicant should include, but is not limited to, any of the following documents: disciplinary reports from any other college attended, court orders, probation requirements, vacated sentences, satisfaction of judgments, initial charges, dropped charges, pending charges, and any other related documentation. All documents submitted must indicate the date and nature of the charges, plea, conviction, court of origin, and any resulting government actions related to the matter. The documentation should be accompanied by a letter of explanation which is written and signed by the applicant.
    3. It is the sole responsibility of the applicant to obtain the needed documentation.
    4. If the requested documents are not received by the deadline given and an extension has not been requested, the admissions application may either be considered incomplete or an admissions decision will be rendered on the information currently on file.
  2. Once the Office of Enrollment Management has received the supplemental information from the applicant, the Director of New Student Connections will distribute the material to the Student/Applicant Background Check Committee. The Student/Applicant Background Check Committee will be composed of three members appointed by the Vice President of Enrollment Management and Institutional Research/Chief Enrollment Management Officer, two members appointed by the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs and Provost, the Associate Vice President of Operations/Chief of Police, and, in an advisory capacity, the General Counsel for the College or their designated representative(s). The Associate Vice President of Operations/Chief of Police’s (or designee’s) sole responsibility will be to provide updated criminal background information on any applicant being considered under the policy. If for any reason a member of the Committee is unable to attend a meeting, the member will notify their Vice President.
  3. This Committee will examine the documentation submitted by the applicant in terms of the nature of the matter(s) under consideration, how recent is the activity and/or conviction, and dispensation of the matter(s) under consideration.
  4. The Student/Applicant Background Check Committee shall meet at least every two (2) weeks to review the submitted material. In special circumstances, Committee members may vote via electronic communications.
  5. Three possible categories of decisions for first-time or returning admissions applicants that may be rendered by the Committee:
    1. Admissions will move the applicant forward through the application process with no applicant background admission conditions.
    2. Admissions will move the applicant forward through the application process with applicant background admission conditions, pending eligibility for admission based on the College admissions criteria. Conditions for admissions may be different than conditions for admission to housing if the applicant is also applying to housing. Conditions for admission can include, but are not limited to:
      1. Probation for a set amount of time;
      2. Probation for the duration of the applicant’s enrollment;
      3. Activity and/or association restrictions;
      4. Providing updated criminal probation reports;
      5. Providing outcome of pending charges by a set date;
      6. Requesting additional information and/or explanation from the student/applicant;
      7. Reserving the right of the College to reconsider any admissions decision, including, but not limited to, denying the applicant continued enrollment at the College;
      8. Delaying admission for a set period of time.
    3. Admissions will deny the applicant based on the documentation presented relative to the applicant background. If an applicant is denied admission to the College, the applicant shall also be denied as to any housing application.
  6. The applicant will receive a customized acceptance letter if admitted with applicant background conditions. The applicant will be notified in writing if his/her application is being denied. All materials related to the applicant background review process will be maintained in the Office of Enrollment Management and will not be part of the official student record.
  7. Appeals. Any applicant denied admission or admitted with conditions to the College based upon a Student/Applicant Background Check Committee decision may appeal the decision by submitting a written request to the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Institutional Research/Chief Enrollment Management Officer within ten (10) business days of the decision. The Vice President for Enrollment Management and Institutional Research/Chief Enrollment Management Officer shall provide a written decision on the appeal within a reasonable time. The Vice President for Enrollment Management and Institutional Research/Chief Enrollment Management Officer may deny the appeal, modify the appeal (including lessening or increasing any conditions of admissions), return the appeal to the Committee for further consideration, or grant the appeal without conditions. The decision of the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Institutional Research/Chief Enrollment Management Officer shall be the final decision of the College.
VI. Housing Applications
  1. When the background check for a housing applicant indicates that the student/applicant has any criminal conviction, pending criminal charge, disciplinary action, or suspension or expulsion from any high school or college, the Office of Enrollment Management Services will send a letter to the applicant requesting supplemental information and/or documentation to explain the nature of the matter(s) involved.
    1. The letter to the applicant will indicate that the supplemental information is needed before the application can move forward through the housing process and must be submitted within 30 calendar days of the date of the letter. If the applicant needs more than 30 calendar days to assemble the supplemental information, then the applicant must submit a request in writing for an extension of time.
    2. The information to be submitted by the applicant should include, but is not limited to, any of the following documents: disciplinary reports from any other college attended, court orders, probation requirements, vacated sentences, satisfaction of judgments, initial charges, dropped charges, pending charges and any other related documentation. All documents submitted must indicate the date and nature of the charges, plea, conviction, court of origin, and any resulting government actions related to the matter. The documentation must be accompanied by a letter of explanation which is written and signed by the applicant.
    3. It is the sole responsibility of the student or applicant to obtain the needed documentation.
    4. If the requested documents are not received by the deadline given and an extension has not been requested, the student housing application will either be considered incomplete or a decision can be rendered solely on the information currently on file.
  2. The Office of Enrollment Management Services will distribute the material regarding the housing application, background check, and material supplied by the applicant to the Student/Applicant Background Check Committee. The Student/Applicant Background Check Committee will be composed of three members appointed by the Vice President of Enrollment Management and Institutional Research/Chief Enrollment Management Officer, two members appointed by the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs and Provost, the Associate Vice President of Operations/Chief of Police, and, in an advisory capacity, the General Counsel for the College or their designated representative(s). The Committee may request input from other campus parties, if deemed necessary. The Associate Vice President of Operations/Chief of Police’s (or designee’s) sole responsibility shall be to provide updated criminal background information on any applicant being considered under the policy.
  3. This Committee will examine the documentation submitted by the applicant in terms of the nature of the matter(s) under consideration, how recent is the activity and/or conviction, and dispensation of the matter(s) under consideration.
  4. Three possible categories of decisions for housing applicants that may be rendered by the Committee:
    1. The student/applicant may move forward through the housing application process with no student/applicant background housing conditions.
    2. The student/applicant may move forward through the housing application process with housing conditions, pending eligibility for admission based on the College admissions criteria. Conditions can include, but are not limited to:
      1. Probation for a set amount of time;
      2. Probation for the duration of the student/applicant’s stay in housing;
      3. Activity and/or roommate and/or room location restrictions;
      4. Providing updated criminal probation reports;
      5. Providing outcome of pending charges by a set date;
      6. Requesting additional information and/or explanation from the student/applicant;
      7. Reserving the right of the College to reconsider any housing decision, including, but not limited to, denying the student/applicant continued housing at the College;
      8. Delaying use of housing for a set period of time.
    3. The applicant for housing may be denied housing based on the documentation presented relative to the student/applicant background.
  5. The student/applicant will receive a customized acceptance letter if the applicant is admitted to housing with student/applicant background conditions. The student/applicant will be notified in writing if his/her application for housing is being denied. All materials related to the student/applicant background review process will be maintained in a confidential shared drive within the office of Enrollment Management Services and will not be part of the official student record.
  6. Appeals. Any applicant denied housing or admitted with conditions to Georgia Gwinnett College based upon a Student/Applicant Background Check Committee decision may appeal the decision by submitting a written request to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost within ten (10) business days of receipt of the decision. The Provost shall provide a written decision on the appeal within a reasonable time. The Provost may deny the appeal, modify the appeal (including lessening or increasing any conditions of housing), return the appeal to the Committee for further consideration or grant the appeal without conditions. The decision of Provost shall be the final decision of the College.

 

 

4.3 Student Residency

Classification of Students For Tuition Purposes

Policy Number: 4.3.2 
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Executive Director for Registration Services; Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC”) adheres to Board of Regents Policy Manual 4.3.2 when classifying students for tuition purposes.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC students and to all GGC faculty, staff, and administrators with the authority to declare or influence a student’s classification for tuition purposes.

 

 

 

  

Tuition Differential Waivers

Policy Number: 4.3.3
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016 
Policy Contact: Executive Director of Registration Services and Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Services 

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

GGC adheres to Board of Regents Policy Manual 4.3.3 Tuition Differential Waivers.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC students and to all GGC faculty, staff, and administrators with the authority to declare or influence a student’s classification for tuition purposes.

 

Verification of Lawful Presence

Policy Number: 4.3.4
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Executive Director of Registration Services and Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Services

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

In accordance with Board of Regents (“BOR”) Policy Manual 4.3.4 Verification of Lawful Presence, Georgia Gwinnett College (“GGC”) will verify the lawful presence in the United States of every successfully admitted person applying for resident tuition status, as defined in BOR Policy Manual 7.3 Tuition and Fees, and of every person admitted to an institution referenced in BOR Policy Manual 4.1.6 Admission of Persons Not Lawfully Present in the United States.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all applicants and students of GGC and to all GGC faculty, staff, and administrators with the authority to make or influence admission decisions and the classification of students for tuition purposes.

 

Intercollegiate Athletics

Policy Number: 4.5
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History: Reviewed May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Associate Vice President/Director of Athletics

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Intercollegiate athletics supports the mission of GGC as an integral part of the Integrated Educational Experience where learning takes place continuously in and beyond the traditional classroom. Intercollegiate athletics is committed to providing an environment that is conducive to academic and athletic success at GGC. The Office of Athletics engages with student-athletes who strive to reach their career goals through personal development, pursuit of an academic degree, and athletic achievement. Georgia Gwinnett College is committed to the goals of the NAIA and its Champions of Character program by demonstrating sportsmanship, integrity, a competitive spirit, and placing high value on the importance of academics. GGC student-athletes are expected to represent the college as ambassadors and leaders, both on-campus and within the community. This policy establishes GGC specific policies for athletics and is designed to be interpreted in connection with the requirements set forth in BOR Policy Manual 4.5 Intercollegiate Athletics.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC faculty, staff, and students involved in intercollegiate athletics.

III. Roles and Responsibilities
  1. Management and control of intercollegiate athletic affairs is the responsibility of the AVP/ Director of Athletics. The Director of Athletics will take the necessary steps to ensure that management of the program is in compliance with the provisions of applicable federal and state laws and the regulations of any governing body and athletic conference with which GGC is affiliated.
  2. Each individual involved in intercollegiate athletics is obligated to maintain competency in knowledge of the rules; to act within his or her realm of responsibility in full compliance with any governing legislation; and to report any violation of NAIA, conference and /or institutional rules of which he or she is aware.
 

Recreation, Intramural Sports, and Club Sports

Policy Number: 4.5.1.2
Effective Date: Febraury 28, 2023
Revision History: Reviewed May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Director, Wellness and Recreation

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Recreation, Intramural Sports, and Club Sports are designed to support the mission of GGC by promoting the holistic development of the student through physical activity programming. Student Affairs offers self-directed activities, instructional, and team sport physical activity whose goals are to provide health, fitness, competition, leadership, social, and teamwork opportunities compatible with one’s intellectual goals. Recreation, Intramural Sports, and Club Sports offers a variety of team and individual activities on and off campus. GGC’s Recreation, Intramural Sports, and Club Sports area is recognized with institutional membership in the National Intramural-Recreation Sports Association and the National Wellness Institute.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC faculty, staff, and students involved in recreation, intramural sports, or club sports.

 

Discipline of Students

Policy Number: 4.6
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History: Reviewed May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Associate Provost for Student Affairs and Dean of Students

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

GGC adheres to Board of Regents Policy Manual 4.6 Discipline of Students.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC students.

 

Violations of State or Federal Law

Policy Number: 4.6.2
Effective Date: March 14, 2023
Revision History: Reviewed May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Associate Provost for Student Affairs and Dean of Students

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

GGC adheres to Board of Regents Policy Manual 4.6.2 Violations of State or Federal Law.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC students.

  

Alcohol and Drugs on Campus

Policy Number: 4.6.4
Effective Date: February 28, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Associate Provost for Student Affairs/Dean of Students

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

It is the policy of Georgia Gwinnett College to provide students and employees with the following information in compliance with the US Department of Education requirement under Part 86, the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations (Education Department General Administrative Regulations [EDGAR 86]).

Georgia Gwinnett College has adopted and implemented a drug prevention program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by all students and employees both on school premises and as part of any of its activities.

GGC will annually notify employees and students by issuance of the policy for drugs and alcohol via publication in the APM. Additionally, GGC will conduct a biennial review on the effectiveness of its AOD programs and the consistency of sanction enforcement and will maintain its biennial review material on file.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC faculty, staff, and students.

III. Potential Health Risks
  1. While the following list is not exhaustive, it serves to demonstrate the range of potential hazards associated with illicit drug and alcohol use.
  2. Alcohol: Loss of concentration and judgment, slowed reflexes, disorientation leading to higher risk of accidents and problem behavior; risk of liver and heart damage, malnutrition, cancer and other illnesses; can be highly addictive to some persons.
  3. Nicotine: Nicotine causes tobacco addiction. Addiction changes the wiring in the brain, making tobacco users crave nicotine. Without nicotine, they will experience symptoms of withdrawal. Nicotine increases blood pressure, blood flow and heart rate. It narrows and hardens the arteries, increasing your risk of blood clots and stroke. Nicotine increases your risk of heart attack and can cause lung disease as well as cancer of the oral cavity and respiratory tract.
  4. Amphetamines. Can cause rushed, careless behavior - pushing beyond your physical capacity, leading to exhaustion; tolerance increases rapidly, causes physical and psychological dependence; withdrawal can result in depression and suicide; continued high doses can cause heart problems, infections, malnutrition, and death.
  5. Cannabis: Causes permanent damage to lungs, reproductive organs and brain function; slows reflexes; increases forgetfulness; alters judgment of space and distance.
  6. Cocaine: Causes damage to respiratory and immune systems; induces malnutrition, seizures and loss of brain function. Some forms are highly addictive.
  7. Hallucinogens (PCP, LSD, Ecstasy): Causes extreme distortions of what’s seen and heard; induces sudden changes in behavior, loss of concentration and memory; increases risk of birth defects in user’s children; overdose can cause psychosis, convulsions, coma, and death. Frequent use can cause permanent loss of mental function.
  8. Narcotics (Heroin, morphine, opium, codeine): Tolerance increases rapidly; causes physical and psychological dependence; overdoes can cause coma, convulsions, respiratory arrest, and death; leads to malnutrition, infection and hepatitis; sharing needles is a leading cause of the spread of HIV and Hepatitis; highly addictive.
  9. Sedatives: Tolerance increases rapidly; produces physical and psychological dependence; causes reduced reaction time, and confusion; overdoses can cause coma, respiratory arrest, convulsions, and death; withdrawal can be dangerous; in combination with other controlled substances can quickly cause coma and death.
IV. Standards of Conduct
  1. Standard of Conduct for Students. All students are prohibited from the following:
    1. Possession and/or consumption of alcohol on campus. Exceptions must be approved by the President of the College.
    2. Use and/or possession of marijuana and/or other illegal drugs.
    3. Possession of alcohol beverage containers (including decorative collections).
    4. Use, possession, and/or distribution of narcotic or other controlled substances except as permitted by law.
    5. Possession of drug paraphernalia, including but not limited to bongs, glass pipes, or hookahs.
    6. Providing or facilitating the use, possession and/or distribution of alcoholic beverages.
    7. Providing or facilitating the use, possession, and/or distribution of narcotic or other controlled substances except as permitted by law.
    8. Appearing at a College activity or on College property in a state of intoxication and/or under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs.
    9. Disruptive or disorderly conduct caused by the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs.
    10. Driving under the influence of alcohol or other controlled substance.
    11. Use and/or possession of a prescription drug if the prescription was not issued to the student or the distribution or sale of a prescription drug to a person to whom the prescription was not originally issued.
  2. Standard of Conduct for Employees.
    1. The use, consumption, or possession of any narcotic, dangerous drug, or controlled substance by any student or employee of the College for which said student or employee does not have legal license or valid prescription is strictly prohibited. The unlicensed distribution, manufacture or sale of any narcotic, dangerous drug or controlled substance by any student or employee of the College is strictly prohibited.
    2. The College supports all federal, state, and local laws relating to the use of alcoholic beverages. The College also endorses the continual development of educational materials which emphasize the problems related to alcohol abuse.
    3. The legal age for possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages in Georgia is 21. The College expects this law to be strictly followed.
    4. The use, consumption, distribution, or sale of alcoholic beverages on any property owned or leased by the College is strictly prohibited. Exceptions may be made only by the President or a designee. No college funds or student activity fees may be used for the purchase of alcoholic beverages.

V. Applicable Sanctions

  1. Georgia Gwinnett College will impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees (consistent with federal, state, or local law) up to and including expulsion or termination of employment  for violations of the standards of conduct. Where applicable, a referral for prosecution may be warranted under the law.
  2. GGC Sanctions for Students:
    1. Students found in violation, through the College’s Student Integrity Process, of the Alcohol, Marijuana, and Other Drug Related Misconduct (see Conduct Regulation 5) are subject to the following possible sanctions:
      1. 1st offense: Alcohol, marijuana, and/or drug awareness activity and probation for the remainder of current semester and for the next 2 semesters (Fall and Spring semesters only) enrolled at the College. Probation extends through summer terms and/or any institutional breaks.
      2. 2nd offense while on probation: Suspension from institution for current semester and 1 subsequent semester (Fall or Spring semesters only). Summer suspension may not be substituted for a Fall or Spring semester and will be included if suspension is initiated during Spring semester.
    2. Any cost associated with drug and alcohol sanctioning will be the responsibility of the student violator. These are sanctioning guidelines. The findings of fact, any particular circumstances, and prior record of the student will be factors considered when determining any appropriate sanctions.
    3. Students who are dismissed, suspended, expelled, withdrawn, or otherwise removed from the College for any length of time should be aware that this action may adversely impact the following (this is not an exhaustive list):
      1. Privilege of living in campus Housing
      2. Housing costs and fees (suspension/expulsion does not forgive financial obligations)
      3. Tuition costs and fees (suspension/expulsion does not forgive financial obligations)
      4. Student Financial Aid including HOPE Scholarship
      5. Health insurance (contact your personal health care provider)
      6. Meal Plan
      7. Use of College resources and access to College facilities
      8. Immigration status for international students
      9. Veterans and dependents of veterans
      10. Student employment on campus
      11. Internships, assistantships, and study abroad
  3. GGC Sanctions for Employees:
    1. For further details on the Drug-Free Workplace Policy, consult the Board of Regents Policy Manual.
    2. An employee who is convicted of any drug violation which occurs in the workplace shall notify the Office of Human Resources within 24 hours of the disposition of or sentencing for a criminal case (including, but not limited to, pleas of guilty, nolle prosequi, sentencing under the Georgia First Offender Act, conviction, and nolo contendere). Employees are required to report the disposition of any case or sentencing occurring during employment even if the underlying crime occurred prior to employment.  Failure to report the disposition or sentencing may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment.
    3. Georgia Gwinnett College is committed to establishing and maintaining a drug-free workplace, in compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988. Under this policy, the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of any illegal drug is prohibited in all work areas of Georgia Gwinnett College, including buildings, vehicles, and grounds. Violations of this policy shall be considered sufficient grounds for disciplinary action up to and including termination, regardless of whether such violation leads to criminal proceedings.
VI. Available Programs and Services
  1. For Students:
    1. On Campus: Counseling and Psychological Services (678) 407-5592
    2. Local Support Groups: Alcoholics Anonymous (404) 525-3178: Narcotics Anonymous - (678) 405-0840
    3. Drug and Alcohol Related Courses: Choices for Life (PHED 1101); Student Health 101 (Online Magazine); Wellness and Recreation Center Programs
  2. For Employees:
    1. Local Support Groups: Georgia Crisis and Access line 1-800-715-4225; Alcoholics Anonymous (404) 525-3178; Narcotics Anonymous (678) 405-0840
    2. Employee Assistance Plan (“EAP”):Contact Human Resources for contact information
VII. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies and Procedures

Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Regulations
US Drug Enforcement Administration’s drug trafficking penalties
Board of Regents Policy Manual 4.6.4 Alcohol and Drugs on Campus

 

Student Code of Conduct

Policy Number:  4.6.5
Effective Date:  September 17, 2018
Revision History:  June 30, 2017
Policy Contact:  Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs

Purpose and Policy Statement

This policy establishes procedural standards for resolutions of alleged student conduct violations. The purpose of this policy is to ensure due process that affords fairness and equity in all student conduct cases.

Georgia Gwinnett College (hereafter referred to as the College) shall take necessary and appropriate action to protect the safety and wellbeing of its community. Accordingly, student conduct should be addressed when such acts occur on College property or at College-sponsored or affiliated events, or otherwise violate the College’s student conduct policies at non-College sponsored events.

Proceedings under this code may be instituted against students charged with a violation of a municipal, state or federal law, when the alleged conduct is also a violation of this code. Proceedings under this code may be carried out prior to or simultaneously with civil or criminal proceedings.

In the event of a discrepancy between these policies and the policies of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, the latter shall govern.

Scope

All students must be aware of and comply with this policy. All employees must be aware of this policy in order to report alleged violations.

Definitions

Business day:  Any day on which the offices of Georgia Gwinnett College (excluding but not limited to College police, housing, and library) are open to the general public.

Club/organization:  Any number of students who have complied with the formal requirements for College registration. A student club or organizations that is referred to the student integrity process will be represented by the president of that club or organization. The club president may designate another active member to be the representative in his/her place.

College:  Georgia Gwinnett College

College official:  Any person employed to perform assigned administrative, professional, or staff responsibilities for the College.

Complainant: An individual or student organization lodging a complaint. The complainant may not always be the alleged victim.

Faculty member:  Any person hired by the College to conduct classroom activities.

Family member:  Any family relationship including legal guardians.

Hearing officer:  Any person or persons authorized by the Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs or Dean of Students or a designee to determine whether a student has violated College conduct regulations and to impose sanctions.

Hearing panel:  A hearing panel composed of Student Integrity Board members convened and authorized by the Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs or Dean of Students or designee to determine whether a student has violated College conduct regulations and to impose sanctions.

Joint hearing:  A hearing in which two or more students, clubs, or organizations are charged with violating one or more conduct regulations pertaining to the same incident.

May:  Is used in the permissive sense.

Member of the College community:  Any person who is a student, faculty, staff, College official, or any other person employed by the College.

Preponderance of the evidence:  Evidence that would lead a reasonable person to conclude that it is more likely than not that the alleged violation(s)  did occur.

Prior record:  All information related to any conduct regulation violation(s) that occurred and were resolved prior to the incident in question.

Respondent: Individual or student organization who is alleged to have engaged in conduct that violates this Policy.

Shall/will:  Are used in the imperative sense.

Student:   All persons enrolled at the College. It further includes persons who are eligible to receive any of the rights and privileges afforded a person who is enrolled at the College including, but not limited to, those individuals admitted to the College and attending orientation programs. An individual who is not registered for the summer, but was registered for the previous spring and is, or plans to be, registered for the fall is considered a student during that summer and through the last day of registration. An individual who registers for a semester and then withdraws, or is withdrawn, is considered enrolled for that semester. Furthermore, the term “student” includes any individual who was enrolled in a previous semester and eligible to return without re-applying for admission.

Student Integrity Board:  Refers to a College committee whose members have received training regarding the procedures for College hearings and the College conduct regulations. The Student Integrity Board members serve on hearing panels.

Roles and Responsibilities

Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs or his/her designee:  Designated by the College to be responsible for administration of the College’s student integrity process.

Office of Student Integrity: Handles all cases involving alleged academic violations and non-academic conduct violations except for matters involving discrimination or discriminatory harassment.

Nondiscrimination/Antiharassment Officer, Title VI Coordinator and Title IX Coordinator: The Executive Director of the Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance (“DEC Executive Director”) serves as the Nondiscrimination/Antiharassment Officer, the College’s Title VI Coordinator, and the College’s Title IX Coordinator. The  Executive Director of Diversity and Equity Compliance is the individual designated by the President with responsibility for providing education and training about prohibited discrimination and harassment to the College community and for receiving and overseeing the investigation of reports and complaints of discrimination and harassment in accordance with this policy. The Executive Director of Diversity and Equity Compliance can be reached at the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Title IX Program Administration, located in Building B, by phone at (678) 407-5010, or via email at titleIX@ggc.edu

Special Assistant Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance/Deputy Title IX Coordinator: The Special Assistant shall serve as, and assume the responsibilities of, the Nondiscrimination/Anti-Harassment Officer, Title VI Coordinator, and the Title IX Coordinator, upon task delegation or case-specific designation by the Executive Director of Diversity and Equity Compliance.

Nondiscrimination/Antiharassment Investigator: The Nondiscrimination/Antiharassment Investigator shall be appointed to investigate individual complaints by the Nondiscrimination/Antiharassment Officer or his/her designee to conduct investigations pursuant to alleged violations of the Nondiscrimination/Antiharassment Policy.

Title IX Investigator:  The Title IX Investigator shall be appointed to individual complaints by the Title IX Coordinator or his/her designee to conduct investigations pursuant to alleged violations of the Sexual Misconduct Policy.

The Honor Statement

“We will not lie, steal, or cheat, nor abide the actions of those who do.”

As an additional guide, students should consider the three values adopted in the Seal of the State of Georgia: wisdom, justice, and moderation.

Student Integrity Authority

The Office of Student Integrity handles all cases involving alleged academic violations and nonacademic conduct violations except for matters involving discrimination or discriminatory harassment. All matters related to discrimination or discriminatory harassment are handled by the Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance under the Student Code of Conduct processes. Student Integrity may handle other nondiscrimination Code violations which may be arise out of, or be related to, discrimination/harassment claims.

The Office of Student Affairs shall develop policies for the administration of the student integrity program and procedural rules for the conduct of hearings that are consistent with provisions of the Code of Conduct.

College Conduct Regulations

The following actions are prohibited and constitute a violation of the Georgia Gwinnett College Student Code of Conduct.

Any student, club, or organization found to have committed a violation of these conduct regulations is subject to the sanctions outlined in this Code. A claim of lack of awareness of policies and procedures does not excuse any violations of such.

The following are conduct regulations:

1.   Academic dishonesty shall be handled under APM 4.1.1.1.2 Academic Integrity Policy for Academic Dishonesty Matters.

2.   Other Acts of Dishonesty. Examples of specific prohibited actions include but are not limited to the following:

A.Furnishing false information to any College official or office.

B.Forgery, alteration, or misuse of any College document, record, or instrument of identification.

C.Causing, condoning, or encouraging the dishonest completion of any College record, document, or form.

D.Offering or causing to be offered any bribe or favor to a College official in order to influence a decision.

E.Tampering with the election of any College-recognized student club or organization.

F.Casting or attempting to cast more than one ballot in any election or referendum on campus.

3.   Disorderly Conduct. Examples of specific prohibited actions include but are not limited to the following:

A.Behavior that disrupts or obstructs the orderly functioning of the College, including but not limited to, teaching, research, administration, and/or service or other College activities on- or off-campus including but not limited to study abroad experiences or other authorized non-College activities taking place on College property.

B.Engaging in conduct that disrupts the academic pursuits or infringes upon the rights or privacy of another person.

C.Physical abuse, battery, fighting, and/or other physical contact that threatens or endangers the health or safety of another person or puts another in reasonable apprehension or fear for his or her safety or other conduct used to coerce club/organization membership.

D.Verbal abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment, coercion, bullying/cyber bullying, and/or other conduct that (i) threatens or endangers the health or safety of another person; (ii) puts another in reasonable apprehension or fear for his or her safety; (iii) is so severe or pervasive that it deprives an individual the benefits of any College education program or activity; or (iv) that is used to coerce club/organization membership.

E.Violation of Board of Regents Policy or College policy, rules, and regulations.

F.Conduct or behavior that is obscene, including but not limited to public exposure of one’s own sexual organs and voyeurism, including, but not limited to, video voyeurism.

G.Failure to comply with directions of College officials or law enforcement officers acting in performance of their duties and/or failure to identify oneself to these persons when requested to do so.

H.Intentional obstruction that unreasonably interferes with freedom of movement (pedestrian or vehicular) on campus.

I.Entering an athletic contest, dance, social, or other College event without the proper credentials for admission (e.g., ticket, identification, invitation).

J.Circulating any advertising media without approval from proper College officials or in a manner that violates or is contrary to policies of Georgia Gwinnett College and state or local law.

K.Unauthorized recordings (audio/visual/other related devices) without permission of the applicable College official.

In recognition and support of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, freedom of expression and academic freedom shall be considered in investigating and reviewing these types of alleged conduct violations.

4. Sexual Misconduct. All alleged sexual misconduct shall be referred to the Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance under the APM 4.1.7 Sexual Misconduct (which also can be found in the Student Handbook: Rights, Responsibilities and General Information).

5. Alcohol and Other Drug Related Misconduct. Georgia law prohibits possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages by those under the legal drinking age and prohibits making alcoholic beverages available to persons under the legal drinking age. Georgia Gwinnett College expects those of lawful age who choose to use alcohol off campus to do so responsibly.

 

Students should be encouraged to come forward and report violations of the law and/or student code of conduct notwithstanding their own improper use  of alcohol or drugs. Any student(s) who voluntarily and in good faith reports information to college or university faculty or staff prior to any investigation concerning use of drugs or alcohol will not be voluntarily reported to law enforcement; nor will information that the individual provides be used against the individual for purposes of conduct violations. Nevertheless, these students may be required to meet with staff members in regard to the incident and may be required to participate in appropriate educational program(s). The required participation in an education program under this amnesty procedure will not be considered a sanction.

Nothing in this amnesty procedure shall prevent a university staff member who is otherwise obligated by law (the Clery Act) to report information or statistical data as required

 

All students are prohibited from the following:

A.Possession and/or consumption of alcohol on campus. Exceptions must be approved by the President of the College.

B.Use and/or possession of illegal drugs.

C.Possession of alcohol beverage containers (including decorative collections).

D.Use and possession of controlled substances except as permitted by law.

E.Distribution of narcotic or other controlled substances except as permitted by law.

F.Possession of drug paraphernalia, including but not limited to bongs, glass pipes, or hookahs.

G.Providing or facilitating the use, possession, and/or distribution of alcoholic beverages.

H.Providing or facilitating the use, possession, and/or distribution of narcotic or other controlled substances except as permitted by law.

I.Appearing at a college activity or on College property in a state of intoxication and/or under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs.

J.Disruptive or disorderly conduct caused by the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs.

K.Driving under the influence of alcohol or other drugs.

L.Use and/or possession of a prescription drug if the prescription was not issued to the student or the distribution or sale of a prescription drug to a person to whom the prescription was not originally issued.

6. Theft, Damage, and Disregard for Property. Examples of specific prohibited actions include but are not limited to the following:

A.Taking, attempting to take, or keeping in his/her possession items of College property; items or services rented, leased, or placed on the campus at the request of College; or items belonging to students, faculty, staff, guests of the College, student groups, or others without proper authorization.

B.Malicious or unwarranted damage or destruction of items of College property; items rented, leased, or placed on the campus at the request of College; or items belonging to students, faculty, staff, guests of the College, student groups, or others.

C.Selling or attempting to sell a textbook unless the seller is the owner of the textbook or has the permission of the owner to do so.

D.Unauthorized taking, attempting to take, or keeping items belonging to the GGC library or items placed in the library for display.

E.Misuse of an identification card or number issued to a student through alteration, forgery, duplication, or other means, or through use of an identification card that has not been issued to the user.

7. Fire Safety and Sanitation. Examples of specific prohibited actions include but are not limited to the following:

A.Misusing, damaging, or tampering with fire safety equipment.

B.Setting or causing to be set any unauthorized fire on or in College property.

C.Possessing or using fireworks, explosives, or other incendiary devices on College property without authorization.

D.Making or causing to be made a false fire alarm.

E.Intentionally or recklessly obstructing a fire exit in any College building.

F.Failure to exit a College building when the fire alarm sounds.

G.Failure to maintain an organization’s facilities and/or surrounding property creating a potential danger to the health or safety of the occupants or other individuals.

H.Failure to comply with GGC’s APM 8.2.89 Tobacco and Smoke-Free Campus “Breathe Easy” Policy. 

8. Weapons. Except as permitted by law, possessing firearms, ammunition, explosives, other weapons, or dangerous chemicals on College property is prohibited. Prohibited devices include but are not limited to air guns, sling shots, zip guns, knives with a blade of two inches or more from hilt to blade tip, knives having a switchblade or automatic blade opener, blackjacks, bolo knives, machetes, swords, spears, any club-type hand weapons, pyrotechnics, throwing stars, nunchucks, throwing knives, toy weapons, or any objects or materials capable of causing and/or used by the offending person to cause or threaten physical harm. This provision is subject to modification based on current Georgia Law. 

9. Unauthorized Entry or Use of College Property, Facilities, or Keys. Examples of specific prohibited actions include but are not limited to the following:

A.Unauthorized entry, attempted entry, or remaining after closing in any building, office restricted areas, or other College facility.

B.Making or attempting to make unauthorized use of College facilities.

C.Unauthorized possession, use, or duplication of College keys or other methods of controlled access (i.e. cards, codes).

10. College Housing Policies and Procedures. Examples of specific prohibited actions include but are not limited to the following:

A.Unauthorized entry, attempted entry, or remaining in restricted areas of any College-owned student residence building.

B.Presence of nonresidents in the residence halls unless required to attend a class, program, event, or fulfill another campus obligation and/or escorted by a current resident. Nonresidents must follow all sign-in procedures.

C.Failure to comply with policies established in various residence halls for the protection of the privacy, rights, privileges, health or safety of the community (refer to  Community Guide: Housing Policies & Procedures).

11. Misuse, Abuse, or Theft of Computer Resources. Failure to comply with acceptable use of IT resources policies, which can be found at APM 11.50.1.1 Acceptable Use of Information Technology Resources and APM 11.50.1.2 Internet Acceptable Use Policy.

12. Gambling. Conducting, organizing, promoting, or participating in any activity involving games of chance or gambling.

13. Hazing. Georgia law prohibits hazing and Georgia Gwinnett College does not condone hazing in any form. Hazing is defined as any intentional, negligent, or reckless action, activity or situation that causes or has the potential to cause another pain, embarrassment, ridicule, or harassment, regardless of the individual’s willingness to participate. Such actions and situations include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Forcing or requiring the drinking of alcohol or use of other substance;
  • Forcing or requiring the consumption of food or any other substance;
  • Calisthenics (push-ups, sit-ups, jogging, runs, etc.);
  • “Treeing’s”;
  • Paddle swats;
  • Line-ups;
  • Theft of any property;
  • Road trips;
  • Scavenger hunts;
  • Causing fewer than six (6) continuous hours of sleep per night;
  • Conducting activities that do not allow adequate time for study;
  • Forcing or requiring nudity at any time;
  • Performing acts of personal servitude for members (e.g., driving them to class, cleaning their individual rooms, serving meals, washing cars, shopping, laundry, etc.);
  • Forcing or requiring the violation of College policies, federal, state or local law;
  • Other conduct used to coerce club or organization membership.

14. Interference with the Orderly Operation of the Student Integrity or any investigative process. This includes investigations handled by any College office, including but not limited to, Office of Student Integrity, Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance and Human Resources. Examples of specific prohibited actions include but are not limited to the following:

A.Unreasonably delaying the student integrity process by failing to schedule or appear for a meeting as requested by a College official.

B.Intentionally providing false, distorted, or misrepresented information to a College official or body or knowingly initiating a false complaint.

C.Disrupting the orderly operation of a student integrity proceeding.

D.Attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the student integrity process.

E.Harassing, retaliating against, and/or intimidating the hearing officer, a member of a hearing panel or any participant in a student integrity process prior to, during, or after that process.

F.Failure to comply with the sanctions imposed under the Student Code of Conduct.

15. Shared Responsibility for Student Code of Conduct Violations. Examples of specific prohibited actions include but are not limited to the following:

A.Acting in concert to violate College conduct regulations.

B.Condoning, encouraging, or requiring behavior that violates College conduct regulations.

C.Allowing, condoning, permitting or providing opportunity for others to violate College conduct regulations.

16. Violation of Law. Violation of any municipal or county ordinance, any law, regulation, or requirement of the State of Georgia, the United States, or, when in another state or country, that state or country.

Student Integrity Process

The following sections govern the Student Integrity process. The process may occasionally be modified on a case-by-case basis to protect the safety, well-being, and integrity of the college community; in these instances, the student will be provided due process, which includes notice and an opportunity to be heard. No further requirements are necessary under this policy for a case-by-case process change or for standard integrity processing under this policy.

Filing a Report

Incidents (except for incidents involving claims of discrimination or discriminatory harassment) of alleged violations of conduct regulations are reported to the Director of Student Integrity or his/her designee. Incidents involving claims of discrimination or discriminatory harassment are reported to the Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance. Individuals or groups filing a report should do so in writing and the report should be submitted as soon as possible after the alleged violation. For individuals or groups filing a report, a meeting can be arranged with a staff member in the Office of Student Integrity or Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance as applicable to discuss the student integrity process.

Complaints to the appropriate department and/or person(s) should include as much information as possible - such as: (1) the type of misconduct alleged; (2) the name and contact information of the respondent; (3) the date(s), time(s), and place(s) of the misconduct; (4) the name(s) and contact information of any individual(s) with knowledge of the incident; (5) whether any tangible evidence has been preserved; and (6) whether a criminal complaint has been made.

Information from complaints may be shared as necessary to investigate and to resolve the alleged misconduct. The need to issue a broader warning to the community in compliance with the Clery Act shall be assessed in compliance with federal law. Incident reports will be forwarded to the Office of Public Safety for Clery Act assessment.

Some reports involve possible violations of regulations, but clearly are the result of an unresolved, on-going dispute between students. Other reports do not involve violations of regulations and/or fall outside College jurisdiction, but they too reflect student disputes. In either of these situations, the students will be informed of the option to resolve the matter through mediation. Mediation is a voluntary process that utilizes an impartial, neutral third party who acts as a facilitator to help the parties reach a mutually acceptable outcome. In any event, the College reserves the right, where necessary, to adjudicate these matters under the student integrity process.

Confidentiality

To the best of the College’s ability, the College will take every effort to protect the confidentiality of the parties.

Where applicable, complaints may be investigated in a manner that protects the confidentiality of the parties and the facts of the case to the extent allowed by applicable law, including the Georgia Open Records Act and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). A record of each complaint and subsequent related actions will be maintained by the College.

Complainants who wish to maintain confidentiality must understand that the College cannot guarantee complete confidentiality will be maintained. For example, the College may not always honor requests for confidentiality as the College must consider its obligation to provide a safe, nondiscriminatory environment. If the College does honor a request for confidentiality, the complainant must understand that the College’s ability to investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the accused may be greatly limited. Complainants who wish to maintain confidentiality at first but later decide to file a complaint with the College and/or local law enforcement may do so but must understand that the College’s ability to investigate complaints is adversely impacted as time passes between the incident and the filing of a complaint thereof.

Retaliation

Anyone who, in good faith, reports what she or he believes to be student misconduct, participates or cooperates in, or is otherwise associated with any investigation, shall not be subjected to retaliation. Anyone who believes he or she has been the target of retaliation for reporting, participating, or cooperating in, or otherwise being associated with an investigation should immediately contact the Office of Student Integrity or Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance. Any person found to have engaged in retaliation in violation of the student conduct policy shall be subject to disciplinary action, pursuant to the code of conduct.

False Complaints

Students who intentionally give false statements to a College official, or who submit false complaints or accusations, including during a hearing, in violation of policy shall be subject to disciplinary action pursuant to the code of conduct.

Amnesty

Students should be encouraged to come forward and report violations of the law and/or student code of conduct notwithstanding their own improper use of alcohol or drugs. Any student(s) who voluntarily and in good faith reports information to College faculty or staff prior to any investigation concerning use of drugs or alcohol will not be voluntarily reported to law enforcement; nor will information that the individual provides be used against the individual for purposes of conduct violations. Nevertheless, these students may be required to meet with staff members in regard to the incident and may be required to participate in appropriate educational program(s). The required participation in an education program under this amnesty procedure will not be considered a sanction.

Nothing in this amnesty procedure shall prevent a College staff member who is otherwise obligated by law (the Clery Act) to report information or statistical data as required.

Access to Advisors

The respondent and alleged victim (where applicable), as parties to these proceedings, shall have the right to use an advisor (including an attorney) of his or her choosing, and at his or her own expense, for the express purpose of providing advice and counsel. The advisor may be present during meetings and proceedings during the investigatory and/or resolution process at which his or her advisee is present. The advisor may advise his or her advisee in any manner, including providing questions, suggestions, and guidance on responses to any questions of the advisee, but shall not participate directly. The College shall not prohibit family members of a party from attending if the party requests such attendance, but may limit each participant to two family members. The College may limit the participation of any family to the same as that of an advisor.

Initial Evaluation of Student Conduct Reports

Regardless of how the College becomes aware of misconduct, it shall ensure a prompt, fair, and impartial review and resolution of complaints alleging student misconduct. Where a report of student misconduct has been made to the appropriate department and/or person,  the College shall review the complaint to determine whether the allegation(s) describes conduct in violation of the  Student Code of Conduct. If the reported conduct would not be a violation of the Student Code of Conduct then the report may be dismissed. Otherwise, a prompt, thorough, and impartial investigation and review shall be conducted into each complaint received to determine whether charges against the respondent should be brought.

Where a report alleges sexual misconduct or other forms of harassment and/or discrimination, the report will be referred to, and the investigation will be conducted through or as directed by, the appropriate office trained and equipped to investigate such matters.

Any report that involves allegation(s) of conduct that could lead to the suspension or expulsion of the respondent(s) in an initial review must be promptly reported to the University System of Georgia Director by the College. The System Director will work with the College to determine whether any interim measure(s) are necessary, to assign an investigator and will collaboratively supervise the investigation with the appropriate College professional. If an allegation is not initially identified as one that could lead to suspension or expulsion of the respondent(s), but facts arise during the course of the investigation that would require oversight from the System Director, the College shall report that case to the System Director or her designee prior to proceeding.

Once it is determined that the student integrity process will be initiated, the respondent will be provided with written notification of the allegations. Email and electronic notifications satisfy the written requirement. Notification will specify the alleged violation(s). Notification will also request that the student, club, or organization arrange a meeting with a staff member.

The student, club, or organization is responsible for arranging this requested meeting within the parameters stated in the notification. The purpose of the meeting is to ensure that the student, club, or organization is sufficiently familiar with the Student Code of Conduct (including the conduct regulations and student integrity process) in order to accurately prepare and present a response to the charges. At this meeting the student, club, or organization:

  1. Will be advised of the right to decline to make any statements or answer questions and that, in doing so, no inference about responsibility will be drawn.
  2. Will be advised of the alleged violations.
  3. Will be advised of the report submitted.
  4. Will be advised of how to access the Student Code of Conduct and any other appropriate written material(s).
  5. Will be advised of the procedures through which student integrity violations are resolved including the options for handling the matter either through informal or formal resolution.
  6. Will be advised that an advisor may be present at the student integrity hearing. The advisor may not address the hearing officer, hearing panel or other persons at the hearing. The role of the advisor will be to consult with the student, club, or organization at reasonable intervals during the hearing. It is the student, club, or organization’s responsibility to find an advisor should they choose to have one present. Having an advisor is not required; it is optional.
  7. Will be advised to consult further with the Director of Student Integrity or Executive Director of the Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance or their designees concerning any question or interpretation of procedure.
  8. Will be advised that formal hearings are scheduled to provide the student, club, or organization a minimum of five (5) business days from the date of hearing notification during which to prepare a response.
  9. Will be advised that any request for a delay of the hearing must be in writing and submitted to the Director of Student Integrity or the Executive Director of the Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance or their designees, who will determine whether a delay will be granted.
  10. Will be advised that, in the event that the College needs to delay the date of a hearing, the student, club, or organization will be notified no less than one (1) business day prior to the originally scheduled hearing when practical. The student, club, or organization will receive a notification of the new hearing at least five (5) business days prior to the new hearing date. Exceptions can be made when deemed appropriate.
  11. Will be advised that all official correspondence from the Office of Student Integrity or Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance will be sent to the student via their College email account. The student is responsible for accessing the College email account. The date notice is sent represents the notice/delivery date.
  12. The information provided in the list above shall also be provided in writing to the student, club, or organization by the appropriate office.

If a student, club, or organization fails to schedule or attend the meeting, the Office of Student Integrity or Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance reserves the right to proceed with the meeting and hold or arrange for a formal resolution in the student, club, or organization’s absence.

To determine whether a club or organization is responsible for a violation of the Code of Conduct, all circumstances will be considered, including, but not limited to: (a) whether the misconduct was committed by one or more members of the club or organization; (b) whether officers of the club or organization had prior knowledge of the misconduct; (c) whether the club or organization funds were used; (d) whether the misconduct occurred as a result of a club or organization-sponsored function; and (e) whether members of the club or organization lied about the incident.

Investigation

Investigation of the matter shall be conducted by an impartial investigator. The investigator shall not be any person directly responsible for adjudicating the case or be involved in the case’s appeal process. The assigned investigator will be determined on a case by case basis.

Throughout any investigation and resolution proceedings, a party shall receive notice of the alleged misconduct, shall be provided an opportunity to respond, and shall be allowed to remain silent during the investigation and resolution process, without an adverse inference resulting. If a party chooses to remain silent, the investigation may still proceed and policy violation charges may still result, and may be resolved against the party. Further, unrelated charges and cases shall be investigated separately, unless the party consents to having them aggregated. Additionally, in any investigation involving allegations of sexual misconduct, timely notice of meetings shall be provided to each party of any meeting at which the complainant, respondent or alleged victim may be present. Timely and equal access to information that will be used during the investigation will be provided to the complainant, respondent and alleged victim (where applicable).

 Where the potential sanctions for the alleged misconduct may involve a suspension or expulsion (even if such sanctions were to be held “in abeyance,” such as probationary suspension or expulsion) the College’s investigation and resolution procedures must provide these additional, minimum safeguards:

  1. The alleged victim and respondent shall be provided with written notice of the complaint/allegations, pending investigation, possible charges, possible sanctions, and available support services. The notice should also include the identity of any investigator(s) involved. Notice should be provided via College email to the address on file.
  2. Upon receipt of the written notice, the respondent shall be given at least five (5) business days to respond in writing. In that response, the respondent shall have the right to admit or to deny the allegations, and to set forth a defense with facts, witnesses, and documents - whether written or electronic - in support. A nonresponse will be considered a general denial of the alleged misconduct. Any alleged victim shall also be provided five (5) business days to respond to or to supplement the notice.
  3. If the respondent admits responsibility, the process may proceed to the sanctioning phase or may be informally resolved, if appropriate.
  4. If at any point the investigator determines there is insufficient evidence to support a charge or to warrant further consideration of discipline, then the complaint should be dismissed.
  5. The investigation shall consist of interviews of the respondent, the alleged victim (where applicable) and witnesses, and the collection and review of documents or other physical or electronic information, as well as other steps as appropriate. The investigator should retain written notes and/or obtain written or recorded statements from each interview. The investigator shall also keep a record of any proffered witnesses not interviewed, along with a brief, written explanation.
  6. The investigation shall be summarized in writing in an initial investigation report and provided to the respondent and the alleged victim (where applicable) in person or via email. This summary should clearly indicate any resulting charges (or alternatively, a determination of no charges), as well as the facts and evidence in support thereof, witness statements, and possible sanctions. For purposes of this policy, a charge is not a finding of responsibility, but indicated that there is sufficient evidence to warrant further consideration and adjudication.
  7. The final investigative report should be provided to the student misconduct panel or hearing officer for consideration in adjudicating the charges brought against the respondent. A copy shall also be provided to the respondent and alleged victim (where applicable) before any hearing. The investigator may testify as a witness regarding the investigation and findings, but shall otherwise have no part in the hearing process and shall not attempt to otherwise influence the proceedings outside of providing testimony during the hearing.

Interim Measures

Interim measures may be provided by the College at any point and should be designed to protect the alleged victim and the community.  To the extent interim measures are imposed, they should minimize the burden on both the alleged victim and the respondent, where feasible.  Interim measures may include, but are not limited to:

  1. Change of housing assignment;
  2. Issuance of a “no contact” directive; 
  3. Restrictions or bars to entering certain College property;
  4. Changes to academic or employment arrangements, schedules, or supervision;
  5. Interim suspension; and
  6. Other measures designed to promote the safety and well-being of the parties and the College community.
  7. The appropriate office(s) shall be consulted prior to the imposition of interim measures.

Interim Suspension

An interim suspension should only occur where necessary to maintain safety and should be limited to those situations where the respondent poses a serious and immediate danger or threat to persons or property. In making such an assessment, the College should consider the existence of a significant risk to the health or safety of the alleged victim or the campus community; the nature, duration, and severity of the risk; the probability of potential injury; and whether less restrictive means can be used to significantly mitigate the risk.

Before an interim suspension is issued, the College must make all reasonable efforts to give the respondent the opportunity to be heard on whether his or her presence on campus poses a danger. If an interim suspension is issued, the terms of the suspension take effect immediately. Upon request, the respondent will have an opportunity to be heard by the respective conduct officer, Title IX Coordinator, or System Director, as appropriate, within three business days in order to determine whether the interim suspension should continue.

Any report that involves allegation(s) of conduct that could lead to the interim suspension of the respondent(s) must be promptly reported to the System Director by the College. The System Director will work with the College to determine whether any interim measure(s) are necessary. If an allegation is not initially identified as one that could lead to the interim suspension of the respondent(s), but facts arise during the course of the investigation that would require oversight from the System Director, then the College shall report that case to the System Director or his/her designee prior to proceeding.

The respondent(s) shall be notified via his/her College email address or other written notice of the opportunity to be heard and to schedule a Pre-Interim Suspension hearing with the Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs or designee.

The respondent shall schedule the Pre-Interim Suspension Hearing within 48 hours of the delivery of the Pre-Interim Suspension hearing notice. Failure to respond within 48 hours may result in the Interim Suspension being issued.

Following the Pre-Interim Suspension hearing, the Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs or designee shall issue written notice to the respondent.

If the respondent wishes to appeal the decision of the Pre-Interim Suspension hearing, he/she shall submit a written appeal to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost or designee.

If the respondent wishes to appeal the decision of the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost or designee, he/she shall submit a written appeal to the President of the College or designee. The decision of the President of the College or designee represents the final decision of the College. Should the respondent or alleged victim (where applicable) wish to appeal the President’s decision, he or she may request review by the University System of Georgia Board of Regents in accordance with the Board of Regents 6.26 Application for Discretionary Review policy.

The respondent shall have the right to appeal the outcome on any of the following grounds: (1) to consider new information, sufficient to alter the decision, or other relevant facts not brought out in the original hearing, because such information was not known or knowable to the person appealing during the time of the hearing; (2) to allege a procedural error within the hearing process that may have substantially impacted the fairness of the hearing, including but not limited to whether any hearing questions were improperly excluded or whether the decision was tainted by bias; or (3) to allege that the finding was inconsistent with the weight of the information. The appeal shall be a review of the record only, and no new meeting with the respondent or any alleged victim is required.

If an interim suspension is issued, the terms of the suspension shall take effect immediately. If such a Pre-Interim Suspension hearing is not possible under the circumstances, an interim suspension may still be issued. In the circumstances where a hearing prior to issuing an interim suspension is not possible, the respondent may make a written request for a hearing to determine whether the interim suspension should continue. Such a hearing must be held within three (3) business days of the request. Any such hearing may be done solely through review of written documentation submitted by the respondent to the person issuing the interim suspension or his/her designee.

Resolution of the Student Integrity Process

During the meeting the staff member will advise the student, club, or organization about the options for resolving student integrity violations. There are three available options from which the student, club, or organization can choose: (1) informal resolution, (2) formal resolution (administrative hearing), or (3) formal resolution (Student Integrity Board hearing).  During the formal resolution, a joint hearing may be requested if two or more students, clubs, or organizations are charged with violating one or more conduct regulations pertaining to the same incident.

Informal Resolution

If the student, club, or organization agrees that the violation(s) of the conduct regulations occurred, he/she/it may decide to have the case resolved through the informal process. Final resolution of the informal process must meet the following criteria: (1) the staff member handling the case and the student, club, or organization agree that informal resolution is a reasonable option given the circumstances; (2) the student, club, or organization must accept responsibility for the violation(s) of the specified conduct regulation(s); (3) the resolution will not result in a suspension, expulsion, or loss of privilege to live in College housing for the charged student, club, or organization; (4) if applicable, the victim should accept the sanctions issued for the violation(s) and may propose sanctions that are reasonable and in accordance with the Code of Conduct. Cases that do not meet all four criteria for the informal resolution will be referred to formal resolution (hearing).

The student, club, or organization is responsible for presenting his/her/its own case. The student, club, or organization may have an advisor (who can be an attorney) and family members present if he/she/it chooses at his/her own expense. If the student, club, or organization plans to have an advisor and/or family members present, he/she/it must notify the Office of Student Integrity or Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance within two (2) business days prior to any meeting identifying the advisor and/or family members. Each student participant is limited to two family members.

Some reports involve possible violations of regulations, but clearly are the result of an unresolved, on-going dispute between students. Other reports do not involve violations of regulations and/or fall outside College jurisdiction, but they too reflect student disputes. In either of these situations, the students will be informed of the option to resolve the matter through informal resolution.

Decisions for Informal Resolution

If the student, club, or organization decides to resolve the student integrity charges informally, and all conditions for such resolution are met, the student, club, or organization will receive a written copy of the decision. The decision will be completed by the staff member handling the case.

Formal Resolution

In no case shall a hearing to resolve the charge(s) of student misconduct take place before the investigative report has been finalized or before the respondent has had an opportunity to respond in writing, unless the respondent has provided a written waiver of rights to these procedures. Further, unrelated charges and/or cases shall be heard separately unless the respondent voluntarily consents to the charges/cases being heard jointly.

Where the respondent indicates that he or she contests the charges, the investigative report has been finalized, copies provided to the respondent and alleged victim (where applicable), the case shall be set for hearing.  However, the alleged victim (where applicable) and respondent may have the option of selecting informal resolution as a possible resolution in certain student misconduct cases where they mutually agree, except where deemed inappropriate by the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost (or his/her designee) or the System Director.

Where a case is not resolved through informal resolution or informal resolution is not available due to the nature of the charges, the respondent shall have the option of having the charges heard either by an administrator (hearing officer) or a hearing panel. However, all cases involving charges of sexual misconduct that go to a hearing shall be heard by a panel of staff and/or faculty.  Sexual misconduct panel members shall receive appropriate annual training as directed by the System Director or Coordinator and required by the Clery Act.  If an administrative hearing is requested, the respondent shall use his or her discretion to determine whether the case should be heard by a hearing panel. Notice of the date, time, and location of the hearing, shall be provided to the respondent, complainant, and alleged victim (where applicable) at least five (5) business days prior to the hearing. Notice shall be provided via College email, where applicable. Additionally, the following standards will apply to any such hearing:

  1. The respondent shall have the right to present witnesses and evidence to the hearing officer or panel, as well as to ask questions to any witnesses. At the determination of the hearing officer or panel, this questioning may take place through the submission of written questions to the panel or hearing officer for consideration; however, the parties’ advisors may still actively advise and assist in drafting those questions. The hearing officer or panel shall ask the questions as written, and will limit questions only if they are unrelated to determining the veracity of the charge leveled against the respondent(s). In any event, the hearing officer or panel shall err on the side of asking all submitted questions, and must document the reason for not asking any particular questions.
  2. Where the hearing officer or panel determines that a party or witness is unavailable and unable to be present due to extenuating circumstances, the hearing officer or panel may establish special procedures for providing testimony from a separate location. In doing so, the hearing officer or panel must determine there is a valid basis for the unavailability, ensure proper sequestration in a manner that ensures testimony has not been tainted, and make a determination that such an arrangement will not unfairly disadvantage any party. Should it be reasonably believed that a party or witness who is not physically present has presented tainted testimony, the hearing officer or panel will disregard or discount the testimony. In sexual misconduct cases, the hearing officer reserves the right to allow a party to testify in a separate room, so long as no party is unfairly disadvantaged by this procedure. A party must still give testimony in the presence of the panel, and the opposing party must have the opportunity to view the testimony remotely and to submit follow-up questions.
  3. Formal civil rules of evidence do not apply to the investigatory or resolution process.
  4. The standard of review shall be a preponderance of the evidence; however, any decision to suspend or to expel a student must also be supported by substantial evidence at the hearing.
  5. The College should maintain documentation of the proceedings, which may include written findings of fact, transcripts, audio recordings, and/or video recordings.
  6. Following a hearing, both the respondent and alleged victim (where applicable under Title IX) shall be provided a written decision via College email of the outcome, as determined by the hearing officer or hearing panel. The respondent shall be advised of any resulting sanctions. The decision should include details on how to appeal, as outlined below. Additionally, the written decision must summarize the evidence in support of the sanction. The same decision will be completed, regardless of whether the student opts for a hearing panel or an administrative hearing.

Sanctions

In determining the severity of sanctions or corrective actions the following should be considered: the frequency, severity, and/or nature of the charge; history of past conduct; an alleged student’s willingness to accept responsibility; previous institutional response to similar conduct; strength of the evidence; and the well-being of the College community. The hearing panel, hearing officer, or administrator that found that a policy violation occurred will determine sanctions and issue notice of the same, as outlined above. Sanctions involving suspension and/or expulsion from the College shall require written approval by the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.

Sanctions for Individuals

The following sanctions may be imposed against a student for the violation of a College conduct regulation. This list is neither exhaustive nor in order of severity and may be enlarged upon or modified to meet the particular circumstances of any given situation.  Sanctions may be increased because of prior disciplinary matters.

  1. Expulsion*: Permanent severance of the student’s relationship with the College.
  2. Suspension*: Temporary severance of the student’s relationship with the College for a specific period of time. The period of time and any requirements that must be satisfied prior to readmission are to be specified in the decision of the hearing panel or the hearing officer.
  3. Conduct Probation: Student is not in good conduct standing with the College. Notice that further finding of responsibility for the violation of any College conduct regulation(s) as specified in the decision of the hearing panel or hearing officer will likely result in suspension or expulsion from the College. The period of probation shall be specified in the decision letter.
  4. Reprimand: Stated disapproval or a warning issued to the student.
  5. Restitution: Reimbursement for a loss caused by the student’s actions.
  6. Community Service Hours: Assignment to community service/volunteer hours to be determined by the hearing panel and/or the hearing officer.
  7. Restrictions: Terms of probation or reprimand restricting privileges. Such restrictions may include, but are not limited to, identification card privileges and/or parking privileges.
  8. Other Educational Sanctions: Projects or assignments designed to educate a student in connection with the effect of his/her behavior. Educational assignments include, but are not limited to, papers, letters of apology, and/or alcohol education (DUI School, etc.).
  9. Recommendation to suspend student employment within the College.
  10. Housing Restrictions: Loss of privilege to live in College housing.
  11. No Contact Order: Directed to refrain from any intentional contact, direct or indirect, with one or more designated persons through any means, including personal contact, email, telephone, or third parties.
  12. Fines: Required to pay a specified fine/fee for violation.
  13. And/Or Other Sanctions: Other sanctions as deemed appropriate based on the student’s actions.

*The standard of review shall be a preponderance of the evidence; however, any decision to suspend or to expel a student must also be supported by substantial evidence at the hearing.

Sanctions for Alcohol and Other Drug Violations

Students found in violation, through the College’s student integrity process, of the Alcohol, and Other Drug-Related Misconduct (see Conduct Regulation 5) are subject to the following possible sanctions:

  • First violation - Alcohol, and/or drug awareness activity and probation for the remainder of current semester and for the next two semesters (Fall and Spring semesters only) enrolled at the College. Probation extends through summer terms and/or any institutional breaks.
  • Any subsequent violation may result in suspension from the College for at least one semester (including current semester and one subsequent semester), Fall or Spring semesters only. Summer suspension may not be substituted for a Fall or Spring semester and will be included if suspension is initiated during Spring semester.

Any cost associated with drug and alcohol sanctioning will be the responsibility of the responsible student. These are sanctioning guidelines. The findings of fact, any particular circumstances, and prior record of the student will be factors considered when determining any appropriate sanctions.

Students who are dismissed, suspended*, expelled*, withdrawn, or otherwise removed from the College for any length of time should be aware that this action may adversely impact the following:

  • Privilege of living in campus housing
  • Housing costs and fees (suspension/expulsion does not forgive financial obligations)
  • Tuition costs and fees (suspension/expulsion does not forgive financial obligations)
  • Student financial aid including HOPE Scholarship
  • Health insurance
  • Meal plan
  • Use of College resources and access to College facilities
  • Status for international students
  • Veterans and dependents of veterans
  • Student employment on campus
  • Internships, assistantships, and study abroad

This is not an exhaustive list.

Additional Sanctions for Student Clubs and Organizations

The following sanctions may be imposed against a student club or organization for the violation of a College conduct regulation. This list is neither exhaustive nor in order of severity and may be enlarged upon or modified to meet the particular circumstances of any given situation.

  1. Recommendation for charter revocation: An official request to a national office that the local chapter’s charter be revoked.
  2. Revocation of College registration: Permanent severance of the club’s/organization’s relationship with the College.
  3. Suspension of College registration: Temporary severance of the club’s/organization’s relationship with the College for a specific period of time or indefinitely. The period of time and any requirements, which must be satisfied prior to re-registration, must be specified in the decision of the hearing panel or the hearing officer.
  4. Probation: Notice that further finding of responsibility for the violation of any College conduct regulation(s) as specified in the decision of the hearing panel or hearing officer will likely result in suspension or revocation of College registration. The period of probation shall be specified in the decision letter.
  5. Reprimand: Stated disapproval or warning issued to the student club or organization.
  6. Restitution: Reimbursement for a loss caused by the club’s/organization’s actions.
  7. Work Hours: Assignment to work a specific number of hours determined by the hearing panel and/or the hearing officer.
  8. Restrictions: Restriction of some or all of the clubs or organization’s activities or privileges, including, but not limited to, social privileges and recruitment privileges.
  9. Other Educational Sanctions: Projects or assignments designed to educate a club or organization in connection with the effect of its member’s actions. Educational assignments include, but are not limited to, alcohol awareness programs, and/or risk management programs.

Withdrawal of Recognition of Student Organizations

All student organizations, including but not limited to societies, clubs, and similar groups of students which are affiliated with, recognized by, or which use College facilities, must comply with local, state and federal laws by all persons attending or participating in their respective functions and affairs, social or otherwise. Violation of applicable laws, including but not limited to the Student Organization Responsibility for Drug Abuse Act, will result in revocation of student organization recognition, and, after complying with the constitutional requirements of due process, shall be suspended from the campus for a minimum of one calendar year from the date of determination of responsibility.

Student Code of Conduct Appeals

A. Suspension/Expulsion Appeals

Where the sanction imposed includes a suspension or expulsion (even for one held in abeyance), the following appellate procedures must be provided. The alleged respondent (and in cases involving sexual misconduct or other forms of discrimination and/or harassment, the alleged victim) shall have the right to appeal the outcome on any of the following grounds: (1) to consider new information, sufficient to alter the decision, or other relevant facts not brought out in the original hearing, because such information was not known or knowable to the person appealing during the time of the hearing; (2) to allege a procedural error within the hearing process that may have substantially impacted the fairness of the hearing, including but not limited to whether any hearing questions were improperly excluded or whether the decision was tainted by bias; or (3) to allege that the finding was inconsistent with the weight of the information. Appeals may be made by the alleged offender for the above reasons in any case where sanctions are issued - even those in which such sanctions are held “in abeyance,” such as probationary suspension or expulsion.

The appeal must be made in writing and submitted  to the Office of Student Integrity or Office of Diversity, and Equity Compliance, must set forth one or more of the bases outlined above, and must be submitted within five (5) business days of the date of the final written decision.

The appeal should be addressed to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost or his/her designee. The appeal will be forwarded to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost or his/her designee for review of the record only, and no new meeting with the respondent or any alleged victim will be held. The Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost, or his/her designee, may affirm the original finding and sanction; affirm the original finding but issue a new sanction remand the case back to the decision-maker to correct a procedural or factual defect; or reverse or dismiss the case if there was a procedural or factual defect that cannot be remedied by remand.

The Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost or his/her designee shall then issue a decision in writing to both the respondent within a reasonable time period.

The decision of the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost or his/her designee may be appealed in writing within five (5) business days (as determined by the date of the decision letter) to the President of the College solely on the three grounds set forth above. The appeal to the President shall be a review of the record only and no new meeting with the respondent or any alleged victim will be held.

The President may affirm the original finding and sanction; affirm the original finding but issue a new sanction; remand the case back to the decision maker to correct a procedural or factual defect; or reverse or dismiss the case if there was a procedural or factual defect that cannot be remedied by remand. The President’s decision shall be issued in writing to both the respondent and the victim (if applicable) within a reasonable time period. The President’s decision shall be the final decision of the College.

Should the respondent wish to appeal the President’s decision, he or she may appeal to the Board of Regents in accordance with the Board of Regents Policy Manual 6.26 Application for Discretionary Review.

B. Sanctions Other than Suspension/Expulsion Appeals

Except as otherwise set out in Section A above, the student, club, or organization may appeal any decision from a formal student integrity hearing or any decision resulting in sanctions other than a reprimand from an informal resolution. Appeal information will be included with the decision issued to a student, club, or organization.

All levels of appeal described in these procedures involve written appeals only. Students, clubs, or organizations neither meet with nor make oral presentations to the appellant officer.

Recusal or Challenge for Bias

Any party may challenge the participation of any College official, employee, or student panel member in the process on the grounds of personal bias by submitting a written statement to the College’s designee setting forth the basis for the challenge. The designee shall not be the same individual responsible for investigating or adjudicating the conduct allegation. The written challenge should be submitted within a reasonable time after the individual knows or reasonably should have known of the existence of the bias. The College’s designee will determine whether to sustain or deny the challenge and, if sustained, the replacement to be appointed.

Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

BOR 4.6.5 Standards for Institutional Student Conduct Investigation and Disciplinary Proceedings
BOR 6.7 Sexual Misconduct Policy
BOR 6.26 Application for Discretionary Review

 

Student Behavioral Concerns Team

Policy Number: 4.6.8
Effective Date: February 5, 2019
Revision History: None
Policy Contact: Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students

Purpose and Policy Statement

Georgia Gwinnett College’s Student Behavioral Concerns Team (SBCT) promotes campus safety and the well-being of students through the identification, assessment, intervention, and management of student situations that may pose a threat to the safety and well-being of the campus community and/or the individual student.

Scope

This Policy is applicable to faculty, staff, and students of Georgia Gwinnet College.

Roles and Responsibilities

Student Behavioral Concerns Team (SBCT):

  • Promotes campus safety and the well-being of students through the identification, assessment, intervention, and management of student situations that may pose a threat to the safety and well-being of the campus community and/or the individual student. 
  • Develops intervention and support strategies and takes appropriate action to help connect the student to any necessary resources and/or further resolve the situation.
  • Meets when necessary as determined by the chairperson to review reported student behavioral concerns.

Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students:

  • Serves as the chairperson of the team and appoints other campus professionals to serve on the team.
  • Shares the Student Behavioral Concerns Team recommendations with the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.

Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost: Reviews the recommendations of the Student Behavioral Concerns Team and notifies the student in writing of his/her decision when warranted.

President: Hears appeals and makes the final institutional decision regarding actions taken by the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

Vice President of Enrollment Management: In cases of involuntary medical withdrawal, reviews the recommendations of the SBCT and will notify the student in writing of his/her decision when warranted.

Student Behavioral Concerns Team Review

The Student Behavioral Concerns Team develops intervention and support strategies and takes appropriate action to help connect the student to any necessary resources and/or further resolve the situation. Should further action be needed, the Student Behavioral Concerns Team shall make recommendations to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost or his/her designee with regard to a student’s ability to continue at Georgia Gwinnett College.

These recommendations may include but are not limited to recommending voluntary, involuntary, or hardship withdrawal; mandating medical and/or psychological assessment; and/or other requirements. The Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students will then share the Student Behavioral Concerns Team recommendations with the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.

The Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost or his/her designee shall review the recommendations of the Student Behavioral Concerns Team and will notify the student in writing of his/her decision when warranted.

The student may appeal the decision of the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost or his/her designee to the President of the College. All appeals must be in writing and submitted within five (5) College business days of receipt of the decision. Students neither meet with nor make oral presentations to the President. There may be times, however, when the President requests a meeting in order to gather further information relative to the matters associated with the appeal.

The President will notify the student in writing of the decision on the appeal. The case materials, including a copy of the decision, will be returned to the Student Behavioral Concerns Team. The decision of the President is considered the final institutional decision.

Student Behavioral Concerns Team records are protected by FERPA and will be maintained by team members.

Involuntary Medical Withdrawal

A student may be involuntarily withdrawn from the College and/or from College housing when, in the majority judgment of the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost and Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students and a professional member of the College’s Health Services or Counseling Services staff, it is determined that the student’s physical, mental, emotional, or psychological health:

  • Poses a significant danger or threat of physical harm to the student or to the person or property of others; or
  • Causes the student to interfere with the rights of other members of the College community or with the exercise of any proper activities or functions of the College or its personnel.

Upon this determination, a recommendation for involuntary medical withdrawal will made to the Vice President of Enrollment Management or his/her designee.

Except in emergency situations, a student shall, upon request, be accorded a meeting with a College official or a hearing prior to a final decision concerning his or her continued enrollment at the College. If the student requests a hearing on such a matter, the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost and Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students shall appoint a hearing body, consisting of faculty and/or staff.

The student may appeal the decision of the Vice President of Enrollment Management or his or her designee to the President of the College. All appeals must be in writing and submitted within five (5) College business days of receipt of the decision. The President will notify the student in writing of the decision on the appeal. The decision of the President is considered the final institutional decision.

Mandated Mental Health Assessment

In circumstances where the SBCT determines a student exhibits or threatens behaviors that pose or suggest a significant and/or immediate threat of harm to themselves or others or which interfere in the orderly operation of the institution, the SBCT may require a student to participate in a mandated assessment. This should serve as an objective assessment of a student’s ability to participate in the social and/or academic life of the college and will be used by the appropriate GGC office in making a decision regarding the student’s on-going participation at GGC.

The student may appeal SBCT’s mandatory assessment requirement to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.  The appeal must be submitted in writing within three (3) business days after receipt of notice of the mandatory assessment.  The Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost will review all relevant evidence to determine whether to uphold the mandatory assessment directive.  The decision of the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost is final.

Mandated Mental Health Assessment Procedure

GGC’s Counseling Center will perform an initial review of the student’s exhibited behavior to determine if there is a basis for requiring an outside mental health assessment.  Such an initial review may be based on written/verbal reports concerning the student, speaking with the student directly and/or any other information deemed sufficient by the GGC Counseling Center to provide its determination of whether the student is required to seek an outside mental health assessment.  The initial review by the GGC Counseling Center shall be in writing. 

If the student is required to seek on outside mental health assessment, the GGC Counseling Center shall provide the student with a written individualized requirement(s) which must be addressed in the outside mental health evaluation.  In addition, the student will be provided a release which the student must sign and provide to both the GGC Counseling Center and the mental health provider which will permit/require the mental health provider to respond to queries from GGC as well as providing GGC with the written assessment by the mental health provider.

If GGC’s Counseling Center determines an outside assessment is warranted, GGC will require the student to see an outside mental health professional sufficiently capable to provide an assessment based on GGC’s Counseling Center’s individualized requirement for the particular student.  The student may select the mental health professional to provide the assessment.  If the student does not have a mental health provider, GGC may offer a list of such providers for the student to use.  The student shall provide the mental health provider with a signed release provided by GGC which permits the mental health provider to discuss the matter with GGC and provide GGC with a written report regarding the concerns set out by GGC.

The College will provide a release for the student to sign, allowing GGC to communicate its concerns and individualized assessment requirements directly to the mental health provider as needed or requested.

The SBCT will consider the individualized assessment as part of its evaluation in conjunction with the GGC Counseling Center staff’s professional opinion.  Participation in the evaluation and receipt of a positive assessment outcome does not in itself guarantee that a student will be able to retain student status or continue participation in all aspects of academic and student life at GGC.

A separate independent mental health assessment (2nd opinion) may also be required, at the expense of GGC, if deemed appropriate by the SBCT.

The SBCT will also consider any additional relevant information, including but not limited to, that which the student wishes to have considered in conjunction with the mandatory assessment.

Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA)
Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA)

 

Appeals

Policy Number: 4.7
Effective Date: September 17, 2018
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students

Purpose and Policy Statement

The purpose of this policy is to provide students with an opportunity to appeal decisions on issues related to Grades, Housing Contracts, Housing Fines, Disability Services and Accommodations, In-State Tuition Classification Status (In-State Residency), Student Accounts and Guaranteed Tuition Plans.

Scope

All students who would like to appeal any matter covered by this policy are responsible for understanding and complying with this policy. 

Grade Appeals

Students wishing to appeal a final grade in a course must first discuss the grade appeal with the course instructor within 30 calendar days of the assignment of the final grade. If the student still wishes to appeal beyond the discussion with the course instructor, the student may then file a grade appeal with the appropriate dean. The student must submit a written request along with all supporting documentation to the dean within 15 calendar days of the instructor’s decision. An interview with the student and/or the course instructor may be a part of the dean’s decision. If the student wishes to appeal the dean’s decision, he/she may then appeal to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost submitting the same documentation as was submitted to the dean within 15 calendar days of the decision.

The decision of the SVPASA/Provost or his/her designee represents the final institutional decision for Grade Appeals.

Housing Contract Appeals

Students who wish to appeal their housing contract must submit their appeal to the Student Appeals Committee. Appeals must be filed online (Appeals). Students wishing to appeal the decision of the Student Appeals Committee may submit a written request for appeal to the Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs or his/her designee stating the reasons and grounds for the appeal within 10 working days of receiving the decision of the Student Appeals Committee. The appeal shall be reviewed by an ad hoc panel comprised of at least three (3) persons. One (1) must be a student; the others may be a faculty member or administrator as deemed appropriate by the SAVPSA or his/her designee. The panel shall review the complaint and decide by a majority vote based upon the information presented. The panel shall make a decision within 10 working days from receipt of the appeal and shall inform the student in writing of their decision. The time may be extended for extenuating circumstances. If the person directly involved is not satisfied with the decision, he/she may file an appeal of the SAVPSA’s decision to the SVPASA/Provost or his/her designee so that he/she may render a decision. All appeals must be in writing.

The decision of the SVPASA/Provost or his/her designee represents the final institutional decision for housing contract appeals.

Housing Fines Appeals

Residents who are billed for damages and/or fined for housing-related violations may appeal the damage or fine assessment. All appeals must be filed online (www.ggc.edu/appeals).

Appeals must clearly demonstrate why the resident charged with the damage or fine believes he/she is not responsible AND must identify the responsible party, if known. Verifiable supporting documentation/materials must be submitted at the time an initial appeal is filed.

Residents will be notified of any decisions in writing via their GGC e-mail address.

If the resident’s appeal is denied, the resident may submit a second appeal to Director of Residence Life or his/her designee stating the reasons and grounds for the appeal within 10 working days of receiving the initial decision.  The decision of the Director of Residence Life or his/her designee represents the final institutional decision for Housing Fines Appeals. 

Disability Services and Accommodation, Parking, Appeals

Students wishing to appeal decisions regarding academic adjustments, auxiliary aids/services, equal access or other Office of Disability Services decisions should submit a written request for appeal to the Section 504/ADA Coordinator who will convene an ADA/Section 504 committee comprised of three members to review the appeal. The student will receive an initial written acknowledgement from the Section 504/ADA Coordinator within two (2) business days following receipt of the written complaint. Within five (5) business days thereafter, the student will receive a written response to his or her complaint from the Section 504/ADA Coordinator communicating the decision of the ADA/Section 504 committee.

If the complaint is not resolved to the student’s satisfaction, he or she may appeal to the Provost or his/her designee as the final level of review. This final appeal must be made in writing to the provost or his/her designee; within five (5) days following receipt of the written response to the student’s complaint from the Section 504/ADA Coordinator and specify the reason(s) for the appeal. The Provost or his/her designee will communicate a final decision, in writing, within five (5) business days following receipt of the student’s appeal.  The decision of the Provost or his/her designee represents the final institutional decision for appeals.

As required by applicable laws and regulations, Georgia Gwinnett College does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission or access to, or treatment in, the programs, services, and activities which it operates. Accordingly, if a student believes that he/she has been discriminated against on the basis of his or her disability they should contact the Office of Diversity and Equity Compliance at 678-407-5085 or follow the procedures outlined in Administrative Policy Manual 12.1 Non Discrimination and Harassment to file a complaint.

Student Parking Appeals

Students wishing to appeal a traffic/parking fine may appeal to the Parking and Appeals Committee. Traffic/parking appeals must be filed in the Office of Parking Services within seven (7) business days of the issue date of the citation. Students wishing to appeal the decision of the Parking and Appeals Committee may submit a written request for appeal to the Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs or his/her designee within 15 calendar days of the decision of the Parking and Appeals Committee.

The decision of the Senior Associate Vice President for Student Affairs or his/her designee represents the final institutional decision for student parking appeals.

In-State Tuition Classification Status (In-State Residency)

Students may be classified as out-of-state for various reasons. Any student who wishes to apply for in-state tuition classification status should submit a Petition for Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes to the Registrar in the Office of Enrollment Management. Documentation of the request must include any form of proof of legal residency in Georgia (Georgia state income tax, Georgia-issued driver’s license, etc.) or justification for waivers as outlined in Board of Regents policy regarding In-State Tuition Classification Status.

If the student wishes to appeal the Office of Enrollment Management’s decision, he/she may then appeal to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost by submitting the same documentation as was submitted earlier in the process within 15 calendar days of the Office of Enrollment Management’s decision. If the student wishes to appeal the SVPASA/Provost’s decision, he/she may then appeal to the President of the College within 15 calendar days of the Provost’s decision. The decision of the President or his designee represents the final institutional decision.

Student Account Appeals

Students wishing to appeal any decision impacting their student account, that is not covered in an appeals process under this policy, may appeal to the Bursar or his/her designee. Appeals must be filed online (www.ggc.edu/appeals). Students wishing to appeal the decision of the Bursar or his/her designee may submit a written request for appeal to the Assistant Controller or his/her designee stating the reasons and grounds for the appeal within 10 working days of receiving the decision of the Bursar or his/her designee.  The Assistant Controller or his/her designee shall make a decision within 10 working days from the appeal hearing and shall inform the student in writing of their decision. The time may be extended for extenuating circumstances.

The decision of the Assistant Controller or his/her designee represents the final institutional decision for Student Account Appeals.

Guaranteed Tuition Plan Appeals

(Please be advised that the Board of Regents has modified the “Guaranteed Tuition Plan”; students should contact the Office of Enrollment Management for questions and applicable rules.)

Students wishing to appeal their classification on the Board of Regents Guaranteed Tuition Plan system may submit a written request for appeal to the Executive Director of for Enrollment Management within 30 calendar days from the beginning of the academic semester. If the student wishes to appeal the Executive Director of Enrollment Management’s decision, he/she may then appeal to the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost, submitting the same documentation as was submitted earlier in the process within 15 calendar days of the Executive Director for Enrollment Management’s decision. If the student wishes to appeal the SVPASA/Provost’s decision, he/she may then appeal to the President or his designee submitting the same documentation as was submitted earlier in the process within 15 calendar days of the SVPASA/Provost’s decision. The decision of the President of the College represents the final institutional decision.

 

Immunizations Against Disease During an Outbreak/Epidemic

Policy Number: 4.8.1
Effective Date: February 28, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact(s): Associate Provost for Student Affairs and Dean of Students

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

During an epidemic or a threatened epidemic of any disease preventable by immunization on the Georgia Gwinnett College campus, and when an emergency has been declared by appropriate health authorities of this state, the President of Georgia Gwinnett College is authorized, in conjunction with the Chancellor of the University System of Georgia and appropriate health authorities, to promulgate rules and regulations specifying those diseases against which immunizations may be required.

Any individual who cannot show proof of immunity or adequate immunization and refuses to be immunized shall be excluded from Georgia Gwinnett College and any institution or facility of the University System of Georgia until such time as he/she presents valid evidence that he/she is immunized against the disease or the epidemic/threat no longer constitutes a significant public health danger.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC faculty, staff, and students.

III. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

BOR Policy Manual 4.8.1 Immunizations Against Disease During an Outbreak or Epidemic

 

 

Immunization Requirements for Students

Policy Number: 4.8.2
Effective Date: February 28, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact(s): Associate Provost for Student Affairs and Dean of Students

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Georgia Gwinnett College requires proof of immunizations for all new students (first-year, transfers, and others) as directed by policy consistent with recommendations provided by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, developed collaboratively by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia and the Division of Public Health of the Georgia Department of Human Resources. Such policy shall be on file in the office of Student Affairs.

Information is available to every new student regarding required and recommended immunizations using information developed by the Division of Public Health in concert with the Office of Student Services of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia.

Specific departments, with concurrence of the President and the Chancellor, may require some immunizations not required for all new students by this policy. GGC is also authorized to impose additional immunization requirements for students when, in the opinion of the President and with concurrence of the Chancellor and appropriate public health authorities, there is a substantial risk of exposure to other communicable diseases preventable by vaccination.

Pursuant to legislation, all students residing in campus housing are required to sign a document stating that they have received a vaccination against meningococcal disease or reviewed the information provided by the institution.

II. Scope

This policy applies to all GGC students.

III. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures
 

Student Field Trip and Off Campus Event Policy

Policy Number: 4.50
Effective Date: February 27, 2023
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

Participation in field trips/off campus events provides students the opportunity to engage in meaningful learning outside the classroom, and as such, these trips are a valuable part of the college experience. Such outings permit students to integrate theoretical aspects of learning with practical applications and observations in environments other than the classroom. These experiences thus afford students an alternative means of applying knowledge.

II. Scope

All GGC staff, faculty and students should be familiar with this policy. 

III. Compliance
  1. Certain guidelines need to be followed to ensure that students gain the most from participation in field trips.
    1. Attendance on field trips/off campus events is optional, and students will not be penalized if they do not attend.
    2. Alternate assignments may be given in lieu of a student’s participation in field trips/off campus events where said participation would have derived extra credit or other course points.
    3. Students who choose to go on field trips must contact the professors of the other classes which will be affected by their participation on the field trip prior to going on the field trip. However, participation on field trips does not exempt students from completing the work which is assigned in the classes that will be missed, nor does it provide a reason for students to miss tests, exams, or other graded work which is performed in the classes that will be missed.
    4. Students who are absent because of participation in college-approved activities (such as field trips and extracurricular events) will be permitted to make up the work missed during their college-approved absences, provided that the student discussed with and obtained approval from the instructor to make up the work missed prior to the student’s going on the field trip.
    5. The field trip originator will ensure that the students who attend field trips complete the appropriate waivers and forms.
    6. The faculty member/field trip originator should deliver copies of the waiver forms to the Dean’s/Director’s office for appropriate filing prior to or within five business days after returning from the field trip or off campus event/project.