2022-2023 Administrative Policy Manual Published September 2, 2022 
    
    Feb 09, 2023  
2022-2023 Administrative Policy Manual Published September 2, 2022

Section 3 - Academic Affairs



Publication and Representation of Accreditation Status and Substantive Change

Policy Number: 3.1
Effective Date: January 26, 2023
Revision History: May 2, 2019; May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Assistant Provost of Academic Assessment and Accreditation

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

This policy ensures compliance with Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (“SACSCOC”) Principles of Accreditation Section 14: Transparency and Institutional Representation and ensures that Georgia Gwinnett College remains in good standing with its regional accrediting organization. SACSCOC requires the institution have published policies regarding (1) publication of its accreditation status, (2) substantive change, and (3) representation to other agencies.

II. Scope

All GGC faculty and staff are responsible for following these policies.

III. Definitions

SACSCOC: The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, the external regional accreditation body for institutions of higher learning in the southern United States.

President: The President is the Chief Executive Officer of Georgia Gwinnett College and is responsible for the institution’s compliance with SACSCOC standards and policies. Along with the Institutional Accreditation Liaison, the President is authorized to communicate with SACSCOC on behalf of Georgia Gwinnett College.

Institutional Accreditation Liaison: The Institutional Accreditation Liaison is the person, who is not the President, assigned by Georgia Gwinnett College to assure compliance with SACSCOC standards and policies. Along with the President, the Institutional Accreditation Liaison is authorized to communicate with SACSCOC on behalf of Georgia Gwinnett College.

IV. Representation of Accreditation Status
  1. Georgia Gwinnett College is responsible for representing accurately to the public its status and relationship with SACSCOC; reporting accurately to the public its status regarding compliance with state and federal government regulations if receiving funding from either or both; maintaining openness in all accreditation-related activities; ensuring the availability of institutional policies to students and the public; publishing appropriate information with respect to student achievement; and, understanding and complying with SACSCOC Principles of Accreditation Section 14: Transparency and Institutional Representation. 
  2. In adhering to SACSCOC policy on the representation of Georgia Gwinnett College’s accreditation status, GGC officials must accurately represent its accreditation status and publish the full statement found in the SACSCOC Institutional Obligations for Public Disclosure policy in the GGC Catalog, the Administrative Policy Manual, Student Handbook, and on the GGC website.
V. Statement of Accreditation Status

Georgia Gwinnett College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) to award associate and baccalaureate degrees. Degree-granting institutions also may offer credentials such as certificates and diplomas at approved degree levels. Questions about the accreditation of Georgia Gwinnett College may be directed in writing to the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA, 30033-4097, by calling (404) 679-4500, or by using the information available on SACSCOC’s website (www.sacscoc.org).

VI. Substantive Change
  1. Georgia Gwinnett College’s academic and administrative officers welcome the expansion of academic opportunities through the development of new programs and/or courses offered to students. The Institutional Accreditation Liaison has the responsibility to report intended changes including development of new academic programs of study, changes to the level of degrees offered, initiation of distance education and new off-site teaching locations to its regional accrediting body, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC), and where required, obtain approval prior to the implementation of such changes through the Substantive Change process. College administrators are responsible for complying with the SACSCOC Substantive Change policy as a condition of the institution’s continued accreditation by SACSCOC.
  2. Contained within SACSCOC Principles of Accreditation, 14.2 specifically outlines the institution’s responsibility for compliance with the Commission’s substantive change procedures and policy. Additionally, SACSCOC provides within its institutional resources a Policy Statement regarding Substantive Change for Accredited Institutions of the Commission on Colleges which outlines the process that must be followed.
  3. Responsibility for Compliance.
    1. Georgia Gwinnett College’s academic and administrative officers have the fundamental responsibility to be generally aware of the substantive change policy and to inform the Institutional Accreditation Liaison at the earliest point possible of proposals/changes that may be considered a substantive change for the College, and to provide the liaison with any data, information, or prospectus necessary to comply with SACSCOC policy.
    2. The Institutional Accreditation Liaison will provide GGC administrators with information about the SACSCOC substantive change policy. This includes, but is not limited to:
      1. Maintaining current information concerning substantive change and sending information about substantive change to institutional leadership at least annually;
      2. Working with institutional leadership to determine whether a proposed change is substantive;
      3. Determining what action with respect to SACSCOC is needed when a change is substantive;
      4. Filing the appropriate notice or prospectus with SACSCOC; and,
      5. Coordinating with SACSCOC and institutional leadership regarding any required follow-up action.
  4. Notification of Proposed Changes. If a change is substantive, the Institutional Accreditation Liaison must follow SACSCOC’s specific procedure with all applicable due dates.  Where prior approval is required, the Institutional Accreditation Liaison shall adhere to the procedure outlined and allow sufficient time for the change to be reviewed by SACSCOC prior to implementation. The Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost will provide the Institutional Accreditation Liaison with a copy of the proposed change. The Institutional Accreditation Liaison, in consultation with SACSCOC staff, will then determine if the change could be considered a substantive change and the appropriate action will then be initiated.
  5. Late Notification of Unreported Substantive Change. If it is discovered that the change may be considered a substantive change and has been implemented without notification to SACSCOC, the appropriate institutional leadership has the responsibility to notify the SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison immediately. It is then the responsibility of the SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison to notify the SACSCOC President as provided in the SACSCOC Policy. To ensure that proposals/changes that may be considered substantive changes do not go unreported, the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost annually reviews changes that have been implemented to ensure that the appropriate notification to SACSCOC has been given if required.
VII. Representation to Other Agencies
  1. Georgia Gwinnett College has an institutional responsibility to adhere to SACSCOC policy regarding accrediting decisions of other agencies. Georgia Gwinnett College’s leadership has the fundamental responsibility to inform the College’s SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison at the earliest point possible of actions of other USDOE recognized accrediting bodies relative to accreditation or certification of its programs.
  2. In order to comply with SACSCOC policy on the representation of accreditation and certification status the SACSCOC Accreditation Liaison will:
    1. Provide guidance with respect as to how Georgia Gwinnett College describes itself in identical terms to each USDOE recognized accrediting body with regard to purpose, governance, programs, degrees, diplomas, certificates, personnel, finances, and constituents;
    2. Be notified by appropriate institutional leadership regarding any accrediting actions pending or taken by any USDOE recognized accrediting body immediately;
    3. Provide as required by SACSCOC, evidence showing consistency in its representation of purpose, governance, programs, degrees, diplomas, certificates, personnel, finances, and constituents; and,
    4. File the appropriate notice with SACSCOC of any change in the institution’s status with one or another of its accrediting bodies.
VIII. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

SACSCOC Principles of Accreditation Section 14.1: Publication of Accreditation Status
SACSCOC Principles of Accreditation Section 14.2: Substantive Change
SACSCOC Principles of Accreditation Section 14.4: Representation to Other Agencies

 

3.2 Faculties

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.

3.2.1 Faculty Membership

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.1.

3.2.1.1 Corps of Instruction

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.1.1.

3.2.1.2 Administrative Officers

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.1.2.

3.2.1.3 Other Faculty Members

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College has filed with the Office of the Board of Regents a list of administrative offices which have ex officio faculty status.

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.1.3.

3.2.2 Election of Faculties

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.2.

3.2.3 Faculty Meetings

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.3 and see Faculty Manual of Policies and Procedures.

3.2.4 Faculty Rules and Regulations

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.4.

3.2.5 Termination of Faculty Employment

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Sections 3.2.5 and 8.3.9.

3.2.6 Regents Teaching and Service To Students Awards Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.2.6.

The Regents’ Teaching Excellence Award and the Regents’ Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Award recognize the finest among the University System of Georgia’s full-time instructional faculty for their demonstrated educational excellence in teaching and in the scholarship of teaching and learning. Nominees shall have a documented record of superlative teaching as well as a strong commitment to impacting student learning and the academic success of students. One (1) faculty member and one (1) department from each University System of Georgia institution may be nominated for each of the above awards; the nomination guidelines and submission procedures for each award are announced annually.

In addition, Georgia Gwinnett College has developed an Annual Awards Policy and Procedures as follows below.

3.2.6.1 Annual Awards Policies and Procedures

Reviewed May 26, 2016

In this section:

Introduction

Policies and Procedures for Faculty Awards

Eligibility

Procedure for Submitting Faculty Nominations and Portfolios

Criteria for Faculty Awards

General Guidelines

Teaching Award

Scholarship and Creative Activities Award

Student Engagement Award

Service Award

Faculty Award Recipients

Policies and Procedures for Student Awards

Eligibility

Procedure for Submitting Student Nominations and Portfolios

Criteria for Student Awards

General Guidelines

Leadership, Creativity, and Service Awards

Scholarship Awards

Freshman Award

Policies and Procedures for Staff Awards

Eligibility

Procedure for Submitting Staff Nominations

INTRODUCTION

Georgia Gwinnett College will recognize the outstanding performance of faculty, students, and staff at the fall convocation ceremony. Faculty awards will highlight outstanding performance in the areas of teaching, student engagement, scholarship and creative activities, and service. Student awards will highlight outstanding performance in the areas of scholarship (one award per school), leadership, service, and creativity. Finally, staff will receive recognition for providing outstanding service to faculty, students, and other staff in the GGC community.

Policies and procedures have been established by the Academic Schools. Those interested in submitting nominations for awards, should review all policies and procedures outlined in this document. Questions about the policies and procedures should be directed to the Chair of the Committee or one of the Faculty or staff members of the Committee.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR FACULTY AWARDS

The Annual Awards Committee will select up to five faculty members to receive awards at the convocation ceremony. Faculty awards will consist of the following:

1 Outstanding Teaching Award

1 Outstanding Scholarship and Creative Activities Award

1 Outstanding Student Engagement Award

1 Outstanding Service Award

1 Outstanding Part-Time Faculty Teaching Award

Eligibility

Faculty must meet all eligibility requirements in order to be nominated for a GGC award.

All nominees must be classified as full-time faculty at the rank of instructor, assistant, associate, or full professor for every award except the Outstanding Part-Time Faculty Teaching Award. Nominees for the Outstanding Part-Time Faculty Teaching Award must have taught at least 1 course at GGC during the Spring, Summer, or Fall semester immediately preceding the nomination period and must be classified as an adjunct faculty member at GGC.

All full-time faculty nominees must be actively teaching (not on sabbatical) for the year they receive a nomination.

Faculty may not receive the same award in two consecutive years.

Procedure for Submitting Faculty Nominations and Portfolios

Individuals interested in submitting a nomination or portfolio should follow the steps listed below. Unless otherwise explicitly stated herein, all faculty nominations must be based upon the summer semester of the previous year through the spring semester of the current year. The nominations should be submitted on or before the first Friday in February. Nominated faculty will be notified by the end of February. The deadline for faculty to submit portfolios is on or before the third Monday in March.

The Annual Awards Committee will announce a call for nominations for faculty awards.

Only students are eligible to nominate faculty members for the teaching (both full-time and part-time) and the student engagement awards. Students who are interested in nominating a faculty member for an award must complete and submit the appropriate teaching or student engagement nomination form to the Chair of the Annual Awards Committee.

Students, faculty, and staff can nominate faculty members for the scholarship and creative activities and the service awards. Those who are interested in nominating a faculty member for an award must complete and submit the official scholarship and creative activities or service nomination form to the Chair of the Annual Awards Committee.

The Annual Awards Committee will review all nominations and identify faculty who meet the eligibility requirements for the specified award.

Faculty who meet the eligibility requirements for the specified award will be notified and provided an opportunity to submit a portfolio which highlights their outstanding performance in the specified area. Please review all guidelines listed below when preparing portfolios.

*Please note that the faculty member selected for the outstanding teaching award at GGC will also be nominated for the Board of Regents teaching award.

CRITERIA FOR FACULTY AWARDS

General Guidelines

Nominated faculty must provide a cover letter addressing why they are deserving of the teaching, scholarship and creative activities, student engagement, or service award.

In addition to the cover letter, nominated faculty must follow the guidelines listed below for the specified award.

Nominees should include all relevant supporting documentation to highlight their outstanding performance in the specified area.

Faculty who are members of the Annual Awards Committee are ineligible to nominate or receive awards during their term on the committee.

Faculty must not be under any personal/academic disciplinary action at the time of selection or award.

Teaching Award

All nominated faculty for the teaching award must prepare a portfolio following the guidelines outlined by the Board of Regents. Follow the link listed below for specific information regarding criteria. http://www.usg.edu/faculty_affairs/awards/. Each nominee must request a support letter from the Dean of their school.

Scholarship and Creative Activity Award

Nominees must demonstrate that they have provided outstanding contributions to their discipline or profession.

Student Engagement Award

Nominees must demonstrate outstanding performance in the area of student engagement.

Service Award

Nominees must demonstrate outstanding performance in the service area. Specifically, nominees can provide supporting documentation illustrating their service contributions to the institution, discipline, profession, or community.

Part-Time Faculty Teaching Award

All part-time faculty nominated for the part-time teaching award must prepare a portfolio outlining his or her teaching accomplishments. The website listed above for the full-time teaching award may give nominees ideas for items to include, but part-time faculty may structure their portfolio as appropriate to suit their part-time status.

FACULTY AWARD RECIPIENTS

All faculty members selected for an award will receive a plaque and a monetary award for their outstanding performance at GGC. As an award recipient, you may be asked to speak at GGC’s Convocation ceremony.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR STUDENT AWARDS

The Annual Awards Committee will select up to eleven students to receive an award at the convocation ceremony. Award recipients will receive a plaque and a monetary award for their outstanding performance at GGC. Student awards may consist of the following:

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - School of Liberal Arts

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - School of Business

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - School of Science and Technology

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - School of Education

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - School of Nursing/Allied Health

1 Outstanding Student Scholarship Award - Student Success

1 Outstanding Freshman Award

1 Outstanding Leadership Award

1 Outstanding Service Award

1 Outstanding Creativity Award

1 Outstanding Student Employee Award

Eligibility

Students must meet all eligibility requirements in order to be nominated for a GGC award.

For the scholarship (other than Student Success) and freshman awards students must have an overall cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above at the institution. For the leadership, service, and creativity awards as well as the student employee award, students must have an overall cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above.

For the scholarship (other than Student Success) awards students must have completed 75 credit hours.

Students must be enrolled at GGC during the period when they performed their leadership, service, and/or creative activities.

Students who are members of the Annual Awards Committee are ineligible to nominate or receive awards during their term on the committee.

Students may not receive the same award in two consecutive years, except for the scholarship awards which may be awarded in consecutive years.

Students must be in good academic and student conduct standing.

Procedure for Submitting Student Nominations and Portfolios

All individuals interested in submitting a nomination should follow the steps listed below. The nominations should be submitted on or before the first Friday in February. Students will be notified by the end of February. The deadline for submitting supporting documentation is on or before the third Monday in March.

The Annual Awards Committee will announce a call for nominations for student awards.

Faculty who are interested in nominating a student for an award must complete and submit the official student nomination form to the Chair of the Annual Awards Committee.

The Annual Awards Committee will review all nominations and identify students who meet the eligibility requirements for the specified award.

Students, faculty, and staff who are interested in nominating a student for the student employee award must complete and submit the official staff nomination form along with a support letter to the Chair of the Annual Awards Committee. The support letter should include detailed information about why the nominee is deserving of the student employee award.

Students who meet the eligibility requirements for the specified award will be notified and provided an opportunity to submit supporting documentation which highlights their outstanding performance in the specified area. NOTE: Students nominated for the student employee award are not required to submit any documentation to the Annual Awards Committee.

The Annual Awards Committee will review all supporting documentation and select one student for each award.

CRITERIA FOR STUDENT AWARDS

General Guidelines

Nominees must provide a cover letter addressing why they are deserving of the leadership, creativity, service, or freshman award.

Nominees should provide all relevant supporting documentation for the specified award.

Leadership, Creativity, and Service Awards

Nominees must demonstrate outstanding performance in the area of leadership, creativity, or service while attending GGC.

Scholarship Awards - Individual Schools

Nominees must demonstrate outstanding performance in the area of scholarship.

Nominees must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Nominees must have completed 75 credit hours.

Scholarship Award - Student Success

Nominees must have been enrolled in one or more Student Success courses during the academic year.

Nominees must have achieved outstanding performance in their Student Success course(s) and have demonstrated significant strides in personal growth.

Freshman Award

Nominees must demonstrate outstanding performance in the area of scholarship.

Nominees must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Nominees must provide one support letter from a GGC faculty member.

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR STAFF AWARDS

The Annual Awards Committee will select two staff members to receive plaques and monetary awards at the convocation ceremony.

Eligibility

Staff must meet all eligibility requirements in order to be nominated for a GGC award.

Staff members who serve below the Director level or Associate or Assistant Dean levels are eligible for nomination; and those individuals who are nominated must be classified as full-time GGC staff members the year they are nominated. Employees of GGC as well as contract employees who work on the GGC campus for contractors are considered “staff” for purposes of this award.

Staff who are members of the Annual Awards Committee are ineligible to nominate or receive awards during their term on the committee.

Staff may not receive the same award in two consecutive years.

Staff must not be under any personal/academic disciplinary action at the time of selection or award.

Procedure for Submitting Staff Nominations

Individuals interested in submitting a nomination should follow the steps listed below. The nominations should be submitted on or before the first Friday in February.

The Annual Awards Committee will announce a call for nominations for staff awards.

Students, faculty, and staff who are interested in nominating a staff member for an award must complete and submit the official staff nomination form along with a support letter to the Chair of the Annual Awards Committee. The support letter should include detailed information about why the nominee is deserving of the staff award.

The Annual Awards Committee will review all nominations and identify staff members who meet the eligibility requirements for the specified award.

The Annual Awards Committee will review all completed forms and select two staff members to receive awards.

AWARDS COMMITTEE

NOMINATION FORMS  

 

3.2.7 Title of Emeritus or Emerita

Reviewed April 2021

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 2.11.

 

 

Core Curriculum

Policy Number: 3.3.1
Effective Date: August 1, 2018
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost

Purpose and Policy Statement

This policy provides guidance to GGC students as they plan their enrollment and the faculty and advisors who provide guidance to them, so that students can satisfy all course requirements and graduate in a timely way. It provides guidance related to information technology course requirements, transferability of core courses, and specific courses that mean core curriculum requirements.

Scope

Students need to be able to access this policy to know about Georgia Gwinnett College’s general education requirements, and those staff and faculty who advise students also need to access the policy.

Roles and Responsibilities

Students: need to know general education guidelines

Employees who advise/mentor students: need to know general education guidelines.

Compliance

For specific requirements for Georgia Gwinnett College, refer to Program Completion in the Georgia Gwinnett College Catalog. In addition to the 60 hour core curriculum all students are required to complete three credit hours of physical education that includes one credit hour of wellness (such as PHED 1101) and two additional credit hours of physical education. Veterans with 12 months or more active military service may request a waiver of the required physical education credits.

Students transferring to Georgia Gwinnett College should be aware that this policy aligns with the University System of Georgia policies and guidelines.

Transfer of Core Courses

Students completing any core curriculum course at GGC or through eCore will receive full credit for that course upon transfer to another USG institution within the same major, even if a core area is not completed and even if it means giving transfer credit across areas (e.g., credit of a math course in Area C).

Information Technology Course Requirement

All transfer students are required to complete ITEC 1001 (or higher IT course) unless completed at a prior institution. This is not an additional graduation requirement but will count toward completion of Area B, Area D, or the program of study.

Core Curriculum Assessment

Assessment of the core curriculum is required as part of GGC’s accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and by the USG Comprehensive Program review process.

General Education Requirements

Students transferring into or out of Georgia Gwinnett College may use the table below to assure completion of all General Education requirements.

 

Areas

Requirements

Area A - Essential Skills (9 to 10 hrs)

(Depending on major)

ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 (English Comp I and II) and MATH 1001 (Quantitative Reasoning) or MATH 1101 (Introduction to Mathematical Modeling) or MATH 1111 (College Algebra) or MATH 1113 (Pre-Calculus) or MATH 2200 (Calculus I) or higher math (must receive a grade of “C” or better)

Area B - Institutional Option (4 hrs)

 

Information Technology (4 hrs): ITEC 1001 (Introduction to Computing) or higher information technology

Area C - Humanities/Arts (6 hrs)

 

Arts/Literature (3 hrs): MUSC 1100 (Music Appreciation) or ARTS 1100 (Art Appreciation) or FILM 1005 (Intro to Film) or ENGL 2111 (World Literature I) or ENGL 2112 (World Literature II) or ENGL 2121 (British Literature I) or ENGL 2122 (British Literature II) or ENGL 2131 (American Literature I) or ENGL 2132 (American Literature II) or THEA 1100 (Theatre Appreciation)

 

Global Culture (3 hrs): RELN 1100 (World Religions) or GEOG 1101 (Human Geography) or one semester of intermediate level foreign language (2001 or higher in Spanish, French, or Chinese)

Area D - Science, Mathematics, and Technology (11 hrs)

Science (7 hrs): Choose one sequence: PSCI 1101K and PSCI 1102K (Physical Sciences I and II) or BIOL 1101K and BIOL 1102 (Biological Sciences I and II) or CHEM 1211K and CHEM 1212K (Principles of Chemistry I and II) or CHEM 1151K and CHEM 1152K (Survey of Chemistry I and II)

 

Information Technology (4 hrs): ITEC 2110 (Digital Media) or ITEC 2120 (Introduction to Programming)

Area E - Social Sciences (12 hrs)

History (6 hrs): Choose one U.S. History course: HIST 2111 (U.S. History I) or HIST 2112 (U.S. History II)* and one other course from the following: HIST 1111 (World History I), HIST 1112 (World History II), HIST 1121 (Western Civilization I), or HIST 1122 (Western Civilization II)

 

Human and Institutional Behavior (6 hrs): POLS 1101 (American Government)*. Choose one from the following list: PSYC 1102 (The Psychological Experience) or SOCI 1101 (Introduction to Sociology) or ANTH 1102 (Introduction to Anthropology) or ECON 2100 (Introduction to Economics)

Area F - Pre-Requisites for Major (18 hours)

Requirements to be determined by the academic program. Must receive a grade of “C” or better.

 

*Passing two exams, the Georgia History exam and the Georgia Constitution exam, will enable students to meet Georgia’s Government Legislative Requirement and the Georgia History Requirement, both of which are required of all college students graduating in Georgia. However, the passing of these two tests does not exempt students from earning the course credits. For example, transfer students who have taken American Government in another state may use the transfer course in the Gen Ed area but must ALSO meet the Georgia requirements by retaking the course in Georgia, taking both of the relevant tests (Georgia History exam and Georgia Constitution exam) OR taking a course in the same discipline that will serve as a suitable substitute. Even if a student has passed both exams, the student will still need to take POLS 1101 and either HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 (6 hours credit). If the student takes HIST 2111 and HIST 2112, he/she can use one of them for the first section “History.” However, the student also will need to take 3 hours of POLS 1101 from the second section “Human and Institutional Behavior.”   

Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

BOR 3.3.1 Core Curriculum

 

Student Success Programs

Policy Number: 3.3.2
Effective Date: November 1, 2018
Revision History: May 26, 2016
Policy Contact: Dean of School of Transitional Studies

Purpose and Policy Statement

Student Success policies guide the operation of programs in the School of Transitional Studies.

Scope

The School of Transitional Studies provides Student Success Programs that support all GGC students during their transition into and journey through Georgia Gwinnett College. Students, faculty, and staff who participate in or provide instruction or service through Student Success programs are responsible for following these policies.

Definition of Student Success Programs

Student Success Programs include the Academic Enhancement Center, Advising Programs, the Honors Program, the English Language Institute (ELI, shared with the Office of Internationalization), and Student Success (primarily Learning Support) courses. The Student Success courses include corequisite Learning Support courses in mathematics and English, including support sections for English as a Second Language (ESL) students. These courses are designed to meet the specific needs of students who, according to USG placement standards, must enroll in Learning Support. The First Year Seminar (GGC 1000) is also supported in the School of Transitional Studies. Students enrolled in Student Success Learning Support courses may be assigned a Student Success advisor in the Georgia Gwinnett College Mentoring and Advising Center (MAC) to ensure they remain on track to complete their Student Success courses and succeed at Georgia Gwinnett College.

Student Success Learning Support Courses in English and Math

Students taking courses or seeking to enter programs leading to the associate or baccalaureate degree must be evaluated for Learning Support placement in English (reading/writing) and mathematics. Default placement is in corequisite learning support unless students exempt learning support placement by meeting one of the exemption criteria in the following areas: High school GPA; SAT or ACT score; transferable credit for an Area A English or Math course; or Accuplacer (or other approved placement test) score high enough to exempt learning support placement. The Learning Support courses offered at GGC include ENGL 0999: Support for English Composition, MATH 0997: Support for Quantitative Reasoning, MATH 0998: Support for Mathematical Modeling, and MATH 0999: Support for College Algebra.

Grades in Student Success Learning Support Courses

The following grades are approved for Student Success Learning Support courses in English and mathematics:

• Passing course grades: A, B, C

• Failing course grades: F, WF

• Academic progress satisfactory, but coursework incomplete: I

• Withdrawal without penalty: W

• Student auditing Student Success course that is not required but taken voluntarily: V

D, S/U, or IP are not allowed grades in Learning Support courses. No degree credit will be earned in the Learning Support corequisite course, but institutional credit will be awarded. Students who may be served by the Learning Support courses are:

• Students who do not meet USG criteria to exempt Learning Support placement.

• Students who are determined by the institution to need academic assistance even though they are eligible to be admitted without Learning Support requirements under USG policy.

• Students who elect to enroll in Learning Support courses in order to prepare for core curriculum courses.

Student Success Course in English for English as a Second Language (ESL) Students

The English for Academic Purposes/English as a Second Language (EAP/ESL) program provides instruction in academic English and tutoring support for students for whom English is a second or additional language. The corequisite English Learning Support course in the EAP program is ENGL 0999E, which is taken together with ENGL 1101. Entering students for whom English is a second or additional language and who do not present high school GPA, SAT, ACT, or other scores high enough to exempt placement testing for English may submit authorized placement test scores, which will be used to determine course placement into either collegiate-level English without Learning Support; or else into the Student Success English corequisite course (ENGL 0999E) along with the collegiate course (ENGL 1101). Students with transfer credit for ENGL 1101 or ENGL 1102 and no Required High School Curriculum (RHSC) deficiency in English or other English language proficiency requirements are not required to enroll in the ENGL 0999E course. Students in corequisite ENGL 0999E exit the Learning Support course and fulfill the Learning Support English requirement by achieving a passing score in the collegiate-level ENGL 1101 course.

If a student does not meet GGC’s minimum English Proficiency requirements (as indicated by an approved method for determining English Proficiency) and is thus not granted regular admission, the student can instead be referred to and admitted into GGC’s approved English as a second language program, the English Language Institute (ELI). The GGC ELI program is an approved USG campus-based ESL program of study. Therefore, proof of completion of the English Language Institute can provide students a waiver of the USG English Language Proficiency requirement at accepting USG institutions.

Advising for Students with Student Success Requirements

Required Student Success classes can restrict the range of collegiate level courses students may take. Students who are required to enroll in Student Success Learning Support courses are not permitted to enroll in collegiate credit courses that require the content or the skills of the prerequisite courses. Students who have accumulated a maximum of 30 semester hours of college-level credit and have not successfully completed required Student Success courses may enroll only in Student Success courses until requirements are successfully completed. Students with transfer credit or credit earned in a certificate or prior degree program who are required to take Student Success courses for their current degree objectives may earn up to 30 additional hours of college-level credit. After earning the additional hours, such students may enroll in Student Success courses only. GGC may limit accumulation of college-level credit to 20 hours.

During each semester of enrollment, a student must first register for all required Student Success courses before being allowed to register for other courses. This policy also applies to part-time students. Two exceptions are possible: First, when two Student Success areas are required and the student is enrolled in at least one Student Success course, a freshman orientation course (e.g., GGC 1000) or physical education course or other activity or performance course may, if available, be taken that semester instead of another required Student Success course. Second, if a required Student Success course is not available, a student may enroll in a course for degree credit, provided the student has met the course requirements, subject to the written approval of the President or designee. Students with Learning Support requirements who are enrolled in both Learning Support courses and collegiate-level credit courses and who withdraw from required Learning Support courses are not required to withdraw from unrelated collegiate courses. There are no limits on attempts in corequisite Student Success Learning Support courses. An attempt is defined as an institutional credit course in which a student receives any grade or symbol except “W.”  

Students exit Student Success (corequisite Learning Support mathematics or English, including English support for ESL) requirements by successfully passing the corresponding Area A collegiate-level course with a grade of C or better. Because registration for the next semester occurs before final grades are calculated, students may initially register for future courses assuming success in their current Student Success courses. However, if they fail to pass the collegiate-level course and thus do not exit the Student Success requirements that are prerequisites for the courses they have registered for, it is the responsibility of the student to amend his or her class schedule by removing the college-level courses for which the student has not satisfied the prerequisites and to register for any required Student Success courses from which the student did not exit. Students who are required to take Learning Support courses in an area may not register as auditors in any Learning Support course in that area. Students who are not required to take Student Success courses in a disciplinary area may elect to enroll in Student Success courses in the non-required area for institutional credit or on an audit basis. There is no limit on attempts for students who voluntarily elect to enroll in corequisite Student Success courses.

Student Success course work in a disciplinary area is cumulative within the University System of Georgia. Students who have been suspended from Georgia Gwinnett College may not be exempted from their required Student Success courses through transfer of course credit unless they are eligible for transfer admission under GGC’s regular transfer admission policies. Students who complete course work and exit an area of Learning Support at any institution in the USG shall not be required to re-enter that area of Student Success Learning Support upon transfer to GGC. Students with Student Success Learning Support requirements who leave GGC for any reason may be re-admitted without Student Success (i.e., Learning Support) requirements if they meet one of several documented conditions that demonstrate they have completed the requirements in an approved alternative way. Completion of transferable Area A courses in English or mathematics from any institution will eliminate further Student Success requirements in that area upon transfer back to Georgia Gwinnett College.

Grizzly Renewal Opportunity Workshops (GROW) Program

Students who have been placed on academic suspension may participate in the Grizzly Renewal Opportunity Workshops (GROW) Program the following academic term (excluding summer). This program engages participants in activities designed to help them improve their academic success skills and their academic standing.  Suspended students who do not participate in the GROW program must sit out for one semester and appeal to the Admissions Committee for readmission.  

Students who choose to enroll in the program must submit a completed GROW Program Agreement and Academic Improvement Plan to the Mentoring and Advising Center by the designated deadlines.  Participants may enroll in no more than seven (7) hours and must attend all scheduled meetings with their assigned student success advisor.  Participants must earn at least a 2.0 semester GPA to be eligible for continued enrollment at GGC and will successfully exit the program when they earn at least a 2.0 semester GPA and a cumulative GPA that brings their academic standing back into good standing as outlined in the GGC academic standing standards. Those who earn a 2.0 semester GPA but have not reached academic good standing will remain in the program for the following semester.  Participants who do not earn a semester GPA of at least 2.0 or who fail to meet any of the conditions of the GROW Program Agreement face academic dismissal.

Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

BOR Academic and Student Affairs Handbook 2.9 Learning Support
BOR 3.3.7 Learning Support Programs

University System of Georgia International Education-ESL Programs

 

3.3.3 Instruction Offered Externally

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College does not offer instruction externally.

 

3.3.4 United States and Georgia History And Constitutions

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.3.4.

All colleges and universities sustained or in any manner supported by public funds shall give instruction in the history of the United States, in the history of Georgia, and in the essentials of the United States Constitution and the Constitution of Georgia, and no undergraduate student in any college or university shall receive a certificate of graduation or a degree without successfully completing course work or previously passing a satisfactory examination on the history of the United States and the history of Georgia, and upon the provisions and principles of the United States Constitution and the Constitution of Georgia.

United States and Georgia History Exams

Eligibility to Take History Tests

The tests are designed to allow students to meet the legislative requirement of demonstrating knowledge of US and Georgia history, only if they failed to fulfill it in the normal course of completing their general education requirements.

Students will be required to take the US History test or to take an additional specific history course if they completed the Area E history requirement without taking a US history course

Students will be required either to take the Georgia History test or to take an additional specific history course if they fall into one of the following categories:

  1. Students who received US History AP credit which exempted their taking the General Education Area E required history courses.
  2. Students who completed a US History course in fulfilling the Area E history requirement at a non-USG system school.

Students may take either test only twice in their academic career, and not more than once per semester. If they fail a test twice, they MUST take an additional course that meets the legislative requirement.

Overview of US History Test

This computer-based test contains multiple choice questions that replicate a rigorous final exam in a course that meets the US History legislative requirements. Thus the test format includes 33 US history multiple choice questions worth 3 points and one question worth 1 point for a total of 100 points. The thirty-four questions are generated from a test bank of over 900 questions.

Overview of Georgia History Test

This computer-based test consists of 40 multiple choice questions that focus on the political and social history of the state from prehistory to contemporary experience.

Alternatives to Taking Test

Students may take history courses at Georgia Gwinnett College that meet the legislative requirement. These courses currently include the US History surveys (HIST 2111 and HIST 2112) and HIST 3265 (Georgia History).

 

3.3.5 University System and Technical College System Of Articulation Agreement

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.3.5.

3.3.5.1 Associate Degrees, Diplomas & Certificates

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.3.5.1.

3.3.5.2 General Education Course Transfer

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.3.5.2.

 

English Language Institute

Policy Number: 3.3.7  
Effective Date: August 1, 2018
Revision History: N/A (new policy)
Policy Contact: Dean of School of Transitional Studies

Purpose and Policy Statement

The English Language Institute policies guide the operations of ELI programming. The English Language Institute’s operations are overseen by the School of Transitional Studies and the Office of Internationalization.

Scope

The English Language Institute (ELI) policies apply to ELI students, ELI staff, and those who participate in programs of the ELI. In addition, there may be implications of ELI policies for other GGC offices and staff.

Definitions

English Language Institute (ELI) student: An ELI student is an English language learner enrolled in one or more courses at the English Language Institute (ELI). ELI students are not Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) students, and acceptance and enrollment at the ELI does not constitute admission to GGC.

English Language Institute (ELI) course: A course at the English Language Institute (ELI) is a non-college credit English language training class designed to help non-native English language learners advance their academic, professional, or personal language learning needs. Except for some special programs, ELI courses are typically offered within an 8-week session. Upon completion of the advanced level of ELI courses, ELI students receive a certificate of completion. ELI courses and the ELI curriculum are overseen by the School of Transitional Studies at GGC.

Full-time ELI student: An ELI student who attends the intensive English program (20 hours per week) is a full-time ELI student. Typically, ELI students who need an I-20 or DS-2019 (Certificate of Eligibility) are required to study full time.

Part-time ELI student: An ELI student who attends ELI classes only part of the day, and so studies for 16 or fewer hours per week, is considered a part-time ELI student.

Special Program: A Special Program at the ELI is an agreement with an ELI student or group of ELI students to allow that student or group to attend ELI courses on a short-term basis (i.e., part of an 8-week ELI session), typically to aid that ELI student or group in achieving a short-term, targeted language development goal. The ELI students (or sponsoring organization) involved in a Special Program must make satisfactory arrangements with the ELI to pay for the course(s), and the ELI students agree to attend regularly for all sessions so approved.

ELI Mission

The English Language Institute (ELI) is intended to meet the academic, professional, or personal literacy needs of learners with English as a second or additional language (ESL). ELI students are recognized by GGC in a special “ELI student” classification for purposes of recording their participation in ELI programming and record management. ELI students will be prepared to succeed in an English-speaking higher educational institution, such as Georgia Gwinnett College, or in a professional work environment where English is the predominant language. The ELI is jointly administered by the School of Transitional Studies and the Office of Internationalization. They collaborate in planning, overseeing, and assessing ELI programming, with areas of responsibility and revenue divided based on agreement.

ELI Acceptance and Enrollment

Acceptance as an ELI student or enrollment in ELI courses is not equivalent to acceptance or admission to Georgia Gwinnett College. ELI students are not Georgia Gwinnett College students, but are enrolled in an approved USG campus-based ESL program of study. All applicants to the regular program must be at least 18 years of age on or before the start date of the program session they wish to enroll in. Applicants to the ELI who need an I-20 or DS-2019 (Certificate of Eligibility) are normally required to study full time (Intensive English program) at the ELI. Applicants to the ELI who do not need an I-20 or DS-2019 (Certificate of Eligibility) to study in the United States may be admitted to the ELI to study full time (Intensive English) or part-time. New ELI students are assigned to a curriculum level based on placement tests at the beginning of each session. For qualified ELI applicants, the ELI may offer the option of joining regular ELI courses on a short-term basis. ELI applicants may be determined by ELI staff to be qualified to join ELI courses already in progress if they demonstrate such participation would benefit their development, and provided the ELI students (or sponsoring organization) can make satisfactory arrangements to pay for the course(s), and that the ELI students attend regularly once they enroll. ELI students must also maintain student health insurance that meets the University System of Georgia minimum standards in order to enroll and remain in the program.

ELI Fees

The approved ELI application fee must be paid in full, and all sections of the ELI application form must be fully completed in English for an ELI application to be processed. ELI students pay an ELI program fee to attend ELI classes and may pay some approved campus (GGC) fees, based on which they may be eligible to participate in some corresponding campus activities or services. Based on the 8-week (single ELI session) or 16-week (two ELI sessions) program, any GGC campus fees will be prorated.

ELI program fees are determined and posted on the ELI website before the start of a given session. Short-term program fees will vary and are set forth in specific agreements. Accepted ELI students are expected to pay all their ELI fees by the first day of ELI classes: Intensive English Program fees for full-time ELI students, which include any approved required campus fees; Everyday English program fees for part-time students; or short-term program fees for ELI students who have been accepted for a special ELI short-term program. After the designated level adjustment period (normally the third day of class in the ELI session), no one will be permitted to attend classes until full payment of fees has been verified.

If an ELI student withdraws from the program for which they have enrolled, the following refund policy applies:

• 75% program fee refund if withdrawn from the program before the end of the first week of classes.

• 50% program fee refund if withdrawn from the program before the end of the second week of classes.

• 25% program fee refund if withdrawn from the program before the end of the third week of classes.

• No program fee refunds after the third week of classes.

ELI Course Structure and Satisfactory Progress

Before classes begin each session, the ELI has an orientation at which ELI students learn about the academic program and other requirements, take placement exams, and register for classes. ELI students who have been accepted must attend orientation or make individual arrangements with the ELI in case of unavoidable absence, which must be documented (e.g., unexpected delays in arrival). Courses in the Intensive English program of the ELI are offered in 8-week sessions (2 each fall, 2 each spring, and 1 each summer) at the following levels: Beginner, Intermediate (divided into Lower Intermediate and Upper Intermediate), and Advanced (divided into Lower Advanced and Upper Advanced).

ELI students who have successfully completed one level, based on instructor assessment as reflected in the final grades issued for each class at a given level, will be promoted to the next level. Those enrolled in the Intensive English program who complete the Advanced level of courses and have demonstrated progress in all other ways have completed the ELI Intensive English program. To demonstrate progress, ELI students must attend at least 85 percent of their classes and do the assigned work, earning a final grade of C or better in all of their ELI courses for the session. Failure to demonstrate progress may result in dismissal from the program.

Attendance and Repeating Levels

ELI instructors take class attendance each day, and students may be marked Present, Tardy, or Absent. In order to demonstrate progress and remain in good standing, ELI students must attend at least 85 percent of their classes in each session of enrollment. Any ELI student whose cumulative attendance falls below 85% during the session is issued an attendance warning at midterm (mid-session). If the low attendance mark occurs only after mid-session, the warning will be issued to the student as soon as possible after it is noted.  Failure to raise attendance back up to 85% by the end of the session will result in the student being placed on Attendance Probation for the next session. During the next session, if the student’s cumulative attendance at any point falls below 85% for the probationary session, the student is subject to dismissal from the program.

If an ELI student is making progress in a level, but the student’s instructors determine the student is not ready to move to the next higher level of study, the student may be given a grade of IP (in progress), which would require the student to repeat the level. A student may voluntarily repeat a level that she or he has satisfactorily completed one time, with instructor and administration approval. In some cases, ELI instructors may recommend a student repeat a completed level to enhance the student’s academic preparedness before she or he advances to the next level. In such cases, it is the student’s decision whether to repeat the level. In all cases in which an ELI student repeats a completed level voluntarily, the student must repeat it in the very next session of ELI enrollment.

Advising ELI Students

Accepted ELI students acknowledge that they are solely responsible for adhering to any study limitations placed on their visa, if applicable. ELI students acknowledge that it is their responsibility to understand and comply with U.S. federal regulations pertaining to the engagement of study at the ELI. Full-time international ELI students holding F or J visas are required to have health insurance that meets the minimum standards set by the University System of Georgia.

In addition to following all ELI policies, ELI students are expected to follow the GGC Student Code of Conduct, including the Academic Integrity policy, with the exception that the appeal procedures for disciplinary actions within the Code of Conduct procedures are different for ELI students and GGC students. For ELI students, any appeal of a disciplinary action as a result of a Code of Conduct or Academic Integrity violation will be filed with the ELI Director or designee. The decision of the ELI Director or designee shall be final, and any violation of the ELI policies or the GGC Student Code of Conduct may result in disciplinary action, including dismissal from the program. With respect to APM 4.1.2 Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, Non-Discrimination and Harassment Policies and Complaint Procedures, the general policies of the institution apply to ELI students, and the protections associated with these areas extend to ELI students.

Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

University System of Georgia International Education-ESL Programs

University System of Georgia English Proficiency Requirements

APM 3.3.2 Student Success Course in English for English as a Second Language (ESL) Students

 

 

3.4 Calendar of Academic Activities

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.4.

3.4.1 Semester System

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.4.1.

3.4.1.1 Georgia Gwinnett College Credit Granting Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The credit hour at Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) is the unit by which course work is measured. All courses originate at the school level and are reviewed based on the standards set forth by the College Curriculum Committee’s Policy and Procedures.

GGC adheres to the view by the Department of Education indicating that learning outcomes are the final and most important result of varied educational platforms, and that individual institutions set standards for granting academic credit. Specific learning outcomes are assessed by each school.

A variety of teaching platforms (traditional day, evening, weekends) are available to the traditional and nontraditional students at GGC. Below are the typical formats used by GGC with the indicators of engaged learning time per credit to which the institution adheres. In addition, selected courses are offered in split sessions in the fall and spring semesters or mini sessions in the summer. The contact time for these different formats is equal to the full semester as per the chart below. Georgia Gwinnett College participates in eCore through the University of Georgia initiative (INGRESS). Contact hours for eCore courses are defined by the University System of Georgia.

Academic Activity Formula

(1)= 50 minutes

1= hour of credit
Meeting Plan Minimum Instructional Minutes Per Day Minimum Engaged Learning Time Per Credit Per semester
Classroom (1)-1 15 Weeks: 3 meetings per week 50 minutes per day 750 minutes
Classroom (1)-1 15 Weeks: 2 meetings per week 75 minutes per day 750 minutes
Classroom (1)-1 15 Weeks: 1 meeting per week 150 minutes per day 750 minutes
Laboratory (2)-1 15 Weeks: 1 meeting per week 100 minutes per day 1500 minutes per credit hour in classroom
Internship (3)-1 15 Weeks Varies per internship; however minimum of 450 minutes of time on task per week 2250 minutes per credit hour
Externship (3)-1 15 Weeks Varies per externship; minimum of 450 minutes of time on task per week 2250 minutes per credit hour
Student Teaching ( 8 CR)   15 Weeks Minimum of 2400 minutes of field time on task each week 5015 minutes per credit hour

3.4.2 Uniform Academic Calendar

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.4.2.

3.4.3 Religious Holiday Schedule

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual section 3.4.3.

In accordance with the University System of Georgia policies and procedures, Georgia Gwinnett College provides students the option of observing religious holidays unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the college. Students who miss class to observe a religious holiday during scheduled class times must make arrangements in advance with the faculty member. Faculty should be sensitive to the student issues regarding religious holidays and are encouraged to provide an alternative option for making up class work.

This policy is aligned with that of the USG Academic Affairs Handbook, Section 2.1, “Semester System, Uniform Academic Calendar, Cancellation of Classes, and Religious Holidays.” An excerpt dealing with the observance of religious holidays by students is provided below:

Religious Holiday Schedule

Decisions as to which religious holidays are covered by institutional policy are left to the discretion of individual USG institutions since the characteristics of the student body and faculty may vary considerably among institutions.

3.4.4 Exceptions

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.4.4.

 

3.5 Grading System

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.

3.5.1 Grade Point Average

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.1.

3.5.1.1 Grades Approved in Determining The Grade Point Average

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.1.1.

Georgia Gwinnett College shall use the Board of Regent’s Uniform Grading System with the additional grades of WA and FN.

The following grades are approved by the Board of Regents for use in institutions in the determination of the Grade Point Average. Georgia Gwinnett College has added the grade of WA and FN.

Grade Grade Point Average
A Excellent (4.00)
B Good (3.00)
C Satisfactory (2.00)
D Passing (1.00)
F Failure (0.00)
WF Withdrew failing (0.00)
WA Administrative Withdrawal (0.00)
FN Failure due to Non Attendance (0.00)

The minimum passing grade for most courses is the “D” grade. ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, MATH 1111 (or equivalent courses) and all Student Success courses must be passed with a minimum grade of “C.” Courses in Area F of the Common Core as well as all courses in the student’s major must be passed with a minimum grade of “C.” In addition, courses that are pre-requisites to other courses require a “C” or better to meet the pre-requisite requirement.

3.5.1.2 Cumulative Grade Point Average

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.1.2.

The cumulative grade point average at GGC will be calculated by dividing the number of hours scheduled in all courses attempted in which a grade of A, B, C, D, F, WF, FN, or WA has been received into the number of grade points earned on those hours scheduled. The cumulative grade point average will be recorded on the student’s permanent record. Institutional credit shall in no way affect the cumulative grade point average.

3.5.2 Symbols Not Included in Determining the Grade Point Average

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.2.

The following grade symbols will be used in the cases indicated but will not be included in computing the student’s grade point average:

I = indicates an incomplete grade for the course due to non-academic reasons which prohibited the student from completing the requirements for a course. The assignment of the “I” grade is at the discretion of the course instructor and Dean but should only be assigned if the student has completed satisfactory work up to the last two weeks of the semester then faced extreme personal hardships in completing the semester. Prior to the last two weeks of the semester, the grade assigned should be “W” or “WF.”

Assignment of an “I” grade indicates that the instructor and the student have worked out a plan for completing the remaining course requirements unless otherwise stated in the incomplete contract. The deadline for removing an “I” grade is the last day of the following semester. If the “I” grade is not removed within the defined time period, the “I” converts to a grade of “F” and is then factored into the student’s grade- point average. Requests for the approval of extensions must be made to the office of the dean.

IP = indicates a student has made progress in a Student Success course, but not sufficient progress to meet the requirements for the next course in the Learning Support sequence. The “IP” grade is not included in the calculation of the student’s grade-point average.

K = indicates credit given by external examination (CLEP, AP, etc.). The “K” grade is not included in the calculation of the student’s grade-point average.

S = indicates successful completion of the Regents’ Writing Skills course and/or the Regents’ Reading Skills course and successful completion of the corresponding Regents’ Test. The “S” grade is not included in the calculation of the student’s grade-point average.

U = indicates unsuccessful completion of the Regents’ Writing Skills course and/or the Regents’ Reading Skills course and unsuccessful completion of the corresponding Regents’ Test. The “U” grade is not included in the calculation of the student’s grade-point average.

V = indicates that a student was given permission to audit this course. Students may not transfer from audit to credit status or vice versa. Students may register, however, on a credit basis for a course that has previously been audited.

W = indicates that a student was permitted to withdraw without penalty. Withdrawals without penalty will not be permitted after mid-semester except in cases of hardship as determined by the Registrar.

WM= indicates a student was permitted to withdraw under the Board of Regents policy for military service refunds. The use of this symbol indicates that this student was permitted to withdraw without penalty at any time during the term.

3.5.3 Grade Point Average Upon Academic Renewal

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.5.3.

Academic Renewal (AR) allows Georgia Gwinnett College degree-seeking students who earlier experienced academic difficulty the opportunity to make a fresh start and have one final opportunity to earn an associate or bachelor’s degree.

Application for Academic Renewal (AR):

  • Students must be admitted to GGC and have had a previous absence of three (3) years from GGC or a regionally accredited institution of higher education to apply for AR.
  • Students with transfer credit taken during the period of absence will receive transfer credit for all coursework eligible to be awarded; however only credit taken over three years ago is eligible for AR.
  • Students are encouraged to apply for AR as soon as possible after admission to GGC. Students may not apply for AR if they were admitted one full year or longer prior to their application for AR.
  • Students must have a GGC transfer grade point average (GPA) of less than 2.0 at the time of admission in order to be considered for AR.
  • Students who are approved for AR will be eligible to graduate with honors based on GGC’s policy regarding academic honors at graduation.
  • All previously attempted coursework continues to be recorded on the student’s official transcript.
  • GGC’s registrar will review the application and determine eligibility.
  • Students who are denied AR can appeal. Appeals will go to the AR appeal committee for a decision.

Procedures for Academic Renewal (AR):

  1. The Academic Renewal GPA will be used for determining academic standing and eligibility for graduation.
  2. To earn a degree, a student must meet the institution’s residency requirements after acquiring academic renewal status.
  3. At least 50% of work toward a degree must be completed after the granting of Academic Renewal status for a student to be eligible for honors at graduation.
  4. Academic credit for previously completed coursework – including transfer coursework taken more than three (3) years ago – will be retained only for courses in which an A, B or C grade has been earned.
  5. Retained grades are not calculated in a Renewal GPA. Such credit is considered in the same context as transfer credit, credit by examination and courses with grades of “S.”
  6. Courses with D or F grades must be repeated at the Academic Renewal institution if they are required in the student’s degree program. Further, all remaining courses for the current degree objective must be completed at the Academic Renewal institution, i.e., no transient credit will be accepted.
  7. Applicability of retained credit to degree requirements will be determined by the degree requirements currently in effect at the time Academic Renewal status is conferred on the student. Specific institutional program regulations must also be met.
  8. If a student does not request Academic Renewal status at the time of re-enrollment after a three (3) year or greater period of absence, the student may do so within one full calendar year.
  9. The Renewal GPA begins with the semester following re-enrollment.
  10. Reentry into any program is not automatic.
  11. If a student is denied Academic Renewal and subsequently does not re-enroll, he/she may resubmit an Academic Renewal application after no fewer than three semesters have passed since the initial petition.
  12. The granting of Academic Renewal does not supersede financial aid policies regarding Satisfactory Academic Progress.
  13. The granting of Academic Renewal does not supersede the admissions requirements of certain programs (e.g., teacher education, nursing) which require a specific minimum grade point average based upon all coursework.
  14. The Academic Renewal GPA will include all coursework taken since re-enrollment.
 

3.6 Creation and Elimination of Academic Programs

Reviewed May 26, 2016

3.6.1 Creation of Academic Programs

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.6.1. Also refer to Faculty Manual of Policies and Procedures Curriculum Committee Policies and Procedures Manual Appendix 5.

3.6.2 Termination of Academic Programs

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.6.2.

 

Comprehensive Academic Program Review

Policy Number: 3.6.3
Effective Date: January 26, 2023
Revision History: August 2, 2019; March 3, 2016
Policy Contact: Provost

I. Purpose and Policy Statement

This policy establishes requirements for conducting program assessment of the College’s academic programs. This policy outlines how the College’s academic program assessment activities and reporting comply with University System of Georgia requirements for academic program review. This policy also codifies that academic program assessment initiatives abide by practices and processes that assure academic program assessment analysis is integrated into institutional effectiveness and strategic planning initiatives.

II. Scope

This policy pertains to all faculty and staff participating in academic program assessment activities. All College faculty, administrators, and staff who participate in academic program assessment activities or who review or apply academic program assessment analysis and reports, are expected to understand and comply with this policy.

III. Definitions

Academic program: An academic program is defined as any degree-granting major of the College, the Library, Student Success courses, the General Education curriculum, any certificate-granting program such as the Honors program, and any terminal certificate or degree such as a Nexus degree.

Annual program review: The assessment report generated on an annual basis that abides by the conditions and reporting schedule outlined below.

Comprehensive program review: The assessment report generated within no greater than a 7-year period that abides by the conditions and reporting schedule outlined below.

IV. Roles and Responsibilities
  1. Department Chair: Department Chairs or other deputized members of the faculty are responsible for developing and implementing their program’s assessment model and for reporting their results to the Assistant Provost of Academic Assessment and Accreditation or other members of the Office of the Provost.
  2. Assistant Provost of Academic Assessment and Accreditation: Assistant Provost of Academic Assessment and Accreditation or other deputized members of the Office of the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs and Provost (“OSVPASAP”) is responsible for assuring program assessment is being conducted and that results are being reported, that program assessment analysis is integrated in to the College’s planning and other institutional effectiveness initiatives, and that program assessment activities abide by practices that improve assessment processes and learning outcomes.
  3. Provost: The Provost or deputized member of the OSVPASAP is responsible for certifying the viability, revision, or removal of an academic program.
V. Annual Program Review

All academic programs will conduct an annual academic program review (“APR”), the purpose of which is to provide analysis of program effectiveness and to promote improvements and innovations to programs’ teaching and learning. The development and review of APRs follows a schedule where learning outcomes and other program effectiveness data are collected and reported during the academic year, report writing and review are conducted during the summer, and report review and reflection occurs during the fall semester of the subsequent academic year. The Assistant Provost of Academic Assessment and Accreditation provides orientation, support, and oversight of APR data collection and report production, and coordinates report and data analysis dissemination and presentation.

VI. Comprehensive Program Review Process

On a cycle of no greater than 7 years for degree programs, each certificate-granting major degree program will conduct a comprehensive program review in conjunction with its APR. Programs will conduct the reviews and create reports that comply with all relevant BOR and GGC policies and procedures. A report by an external review group may be included when appropriate or when requested by the Provost.

VII. Related Regulations, Statutes, Policies, and Procedures

BOR Academic and Student Affairs Handbook 2.3.6 Comprehensive Program Review
Georgia Gwinnett College Institutional Research and Analytics Program Review Content

 

3.7 Regents Writing and Reading Skills Requirement

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.7.

 

3.8 Degrees

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.8.

3.8.1 General

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.8.1.

3.8.2 Graduate Degrees

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College does not offer graduate degrees.

3.8.3 Residence Requirement for Degree

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.8.3.

Georgia Gwinnett College requires all students to complete at least 25% of their overall semester hours of credit in residence prior to graduation. A student is defined to be “in residence” when he/she is taking Georgia Gwinnett College courses. Transient courses taken at another institution and courses transferred from other colleges are not considered to qualify a student as “in residence.”

Typically, the last thirty one (31) semester hours of a student’s academic program satisfies the requirement to be “in residence.” Alternative arrangements to using the last thirty one (31) semester hours of the student’s academic program must be approved by the appropriate School Dean with notification of the approval sent to the Registrar’s Office.

Under no circumstances will a student be permitted to graduate from Georgia Gwinnett College without satisfying the “in residence” requirement.

3.8.4 Honorary Degrees

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.8.4.

3.8.5 Diplomas Earned at Institutions Under Previous Name

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.8.5.

3.8.50 Posthumous Degrees

Reviewed February 16, 2016

A posthumous undergraduate degree may be awarded at the request of or with concurrence of the immediate family or guardian of the deceased and upon recommendation of the faculty. The following criteria apply:

  • The student had earned at least 90 semester hours of credit toward the degree, at least 30 of which were completed at GGC;
  • The student had earned at least 12 semester hours of upper-division coursework in his or her major;
  • The student’s GGC cumulative GPA was at least a 2.0.
 

3.9 Academic Advisement and Mentoring

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.9.

Each institution shall have a program for the advisement of its students. Academic advisement is the primary responsibility of the faculty and should be integrally related to the education process. Effective advisement shall be credited toward retention, tenure, and promotion. It shall be a specific topic of faculty evaluation (BR Minutes, 1980-81, P. 85).”

In keeping with its commitment to create a culture devoted to the holistic development of students, Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC) embeds traditional academic advising (course selection and academic program planning) within a broader context of career planning, goal clarification, and personal growth. Georgia Gwinnett College has chosen the term “mentoring” for its academic advisement program to emphasize this focus on the whole student, rather than simply on academic matters.

Mission

The mission of the GGC Student Mentoring Program is facilitating student success, development, and retention by supporting the design and implementation of educational and career plans and enhancing student engagement in the academic community.

Academic Advising Model

In its broad definition of academic advising, the University System of Georgia asserts that academic advising “…represents…an opportunity for the faculty and the institution to express a special interest in both the personal and academic welfare of the students.” In keeping with this view, the overall goal of mentoring at GGC is to assure that all students achieve the Integrated Educational Experience (IEE) outcomes of the college:

  • Clearly communicate ideas in written and oral form
  • Demonstrate creativity and critical thinking in inter- and multidisciplinary contexts
  • Demonstrate effective use of information technology
  • Demonstrate an ability to collaborate in diverse and global contexts
  • Demonstrate an understanding of human and institutional decision making from multiple perspectives
  • Demonstrate an understanding of moral and ethical principles
  • Demonstrate and apply leadership principles

In support of these goals, mentoring at GGC encompasses the three broad areas of academic advising, career advising, and personal growth. Within these three broad areas, the outcomes of mentoring are:

Academic Advising

  • Development of academic program plans appropriate for students’ anticipated majors and career goals.
  • Progression toward completion of academic requirements and graduation at a reasonable rate.
  • Awareness of policies and procedures pertinent to completion of students’ planned academic programs.
  • Awareness of special academic opportunities such as study abroad, internships, etc.

Career Advising

  • Identification of educational and career objectives commensurate with students’ interests and abilities
  • Exploration of academic and other requirements for students’ chosen careers.
  • Exploration of post-graduate educational or employment opportunities for students’ chosen careers.

Personal Growth

  • Awareness of on-campus support available to students.
  • Engagement in the co-curricular program of the college.
  • Demonstrate leadership in the classroom, college, and/or community.
  • Make appropriate life decisions and accept personal responsibility for the consequences of decisions.

Ultimately, Georgia Gwinnett College graduates will be informed, engaged citizens of the community who are inspired to a lifetime of service.

Role of Faculty

All faculty and selected staff are engaged in mentoring students. Effective mentoring is a critical element in the annual evaluation process for faculty. All GGC students are assigned a faculty mentor at the point of matriculation and continue to be mentored by a faculty member throughout their educational careers.

3.9.1 Minority Advising Program

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Academic & Student Affairs Handbook Section 2.7.1

SOURCE: Memorandum from Vice Chancellor to Presidents, 7/9/93.

 

3.10 Academic Textbooks

Reviewed May 26, 2016

See Board of Regents Policy Manual Section 3.10.

 

3.15 Classroom Visitors Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Faculty members have the right to allow or deny visitors to their classrooms, except for authorized GGC personnel or external visitors who have been authorized by the administration to visit for a valid business purpose. Faculty should give their designated Dean the courtesy of sufficient advance notice when inviting high profile visitors to class. The Office of Enrollment Management may bring prospective students and other guests to classroom sessions, and as a courtesy, will notify instructors in advance of these visits. Occasionally a student may wish to bring a visitor to campus for participation in various events. The following requirements are applicable to all guests who wish to visit instructional areas while a class is in session.

  1. Visitors entering the classroom environment must comply with all GGC institutional policies and procedures.
  2. Students must obtain prior permission from the instructor before allowing visitors to enter the classroom. Approval or denial of a student’s request is within the sole discretion of the instructor. This policy is applicable to students wishing to have adults and/or children visit classroom sessions.
  3. Even with prior permission, instructors retain the right to ask a student’s visitor(s) to leave the classroom should it be deemed necessary or appropriate by the instructor. If a visitor does not leave the classroom when requested, the instructor may contact GGC security for assistance.
  4. Although visitors may generally observe classroom sessions, visitor participation in activity classes, laboratory sessions or studio work is discouraged, unless the visitor has been invited into the class as part of the curriculum. Visitor participation in other types of classroom activities may be approved or denied by the instructor.
  5. Child visitors must be under the supervision of their adult sponsor at all times. Children may not visit a class if they are ill. Nor may children be admitted to a classroom or lab area where dangerous substances or equipment are stored.

This policy is generally applicable to all areas of campus operations; however exceptions may be requested by a parenting student experiencing childcare emergencies. On an emergency basis, a parenting student with a documented childcare related emergency, may request options including but not limited to 1) an excused absence from class ; 2) an extension of time for completion of course assignment; 3) a hardship withdrawal and /or incomplete. Allowances granted under this section shall be for emergency childcare related exceptions and may be limited in number and scope per term.

It remains the responsibility of the parenting student to manage his/her ongoing child care needs. The College does not accept or infer responsibility for the care of children under this policy. Student parents must supervise their children at all times when on campus.

Notwithstanding the above, a parenting student may not bring a child to the classroom for any reason, without the express authorization of the professor or campus official. Laboratory and other high safety areas may be excluded from this exception and access to these areas may be denied to children at any time.

In the event exceptions are allowed by faculty or others, said Authorization may be revoked at any time by a campus official, as allowances under this section are not an automatic right. The allowances may be requested by the parenting student and considered or denied by the instructor/campus official based on the totality of the circumstances, safety factors, and/ or the operational needs of the College.

  1. No animals are allowed in classrooms or other instructional areas, except for service animals aiding a person with a disability. In accordance with ADA standards, Effective March 15, 2011, “Service animal means any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals for the purposes of this definition.”

Students who invite visitors into the classroom or lab environment are expected to explain applicable rules, including but not limited to safety related policies and practices.

  1. By entering the classroom environment, all visitors accept assumption of the risks of exposure to normal classroom/lab exercises and/or related experiments.

If you have any questions concerning the GGC Classroom Visitor Policy, please contact the Office of the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.

 

3.50 Academic Freedom Policy

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Academic Freedom Policy

It is Georgia Gwinnett College’s policy to publish academic freedom statement in all major policy documents that are used by the faculty, staff, and students. GGC is committed to the protection of Academic Freedom by providing grievance procedures that can be used in causes of violation of Academic Freedom. Grievance procedures can be found in section V of the Faculty Manual of Policies and Procedures.

Academic Freedom statement

As a liberal arts college dedicated to the holistic development of students and to the production of graduates who can anticipate and respond effectively to the changing world, Georgia Gwinnett College affirms the vital role of diverse perspectives in helping students to develop their own knowledge and their ability to evaluate knowledge claims critically. The administration, faculty, staff and students share responsibility for fostering a climate that is favorable to the free exchange of ideas and to the examination of conflicting ideas and interpretations using generally accepted disciplinary standards of inquiry. Freedom of speech and expression extends to all members of the academic community, subject to commonly accepted constitutional limits on speech that is libelous or slanderous, incites violence, or discriminates against or harasses others.

Academic freedom is essential to the integrity of intellectual inquiry and scholarly criticism, to the dissemination of knowledge, and to the search for truth and wisdom. It is the foundation upon which the all of the intellectual activity of the college rests. Faculty are free to pursue scholarly interests without fear of censure, discipline, or reprisal. This freedom extends to the display, publication, and performance of creative work. Faculty may speak freely on all matters of college governance, and may speak, work, or act as an individual in the public arena without fear of institutional discipline or restraint.

A fundamental goal of liberal arts education is the development of students’ skills of analysis and critical inquiry. To this end, faculty are free to teach and discuss any aspect of a given topic pertinent to the course being taught as a means of teaching students to explore and evaluate competing perspectives and interpretations as they learn to assemble their own informed judgments. Faculty have a concomitant responsibility to teach students to evaluate knowledge claims using standards of evidence accepted in their respective disciplines, and to promote respect for competing views offered by others. Students have the right to a safe classroom environment in which they can explore controversial ideas in an atmosphere characterized by openness, tolerance and civility, and where they will be graded only on the intellectual merits of their work.

The College has established formal grievance procedures for addressing claims of unfair academic treatment by any member of the campus community.

Our view of academic freedom incorporates the principles of academic freedom stated by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP, 1940) as follows:

  1. The teacher is entitled to full freedom in research and in the publication of the results, subject to the adequate performance of [his/her] other academic duties; but research for pecuniary return should be based upon an understanding with the authorities of the institution.
  2. The teacher is entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing [his/her] subject, but [he/she] should be careful not to introduce into his/her teaching controversial matter which has no relation to his/her subject. Limitations of academic freedom because of religious or other aims of the institution should be clearly stated in writing at the time of the appointment.
  3. The college or university teacher is a citizen, a member of a learned profession, and an officer of an educational institution. When [he/she] speaks or writes as a citizen, [he/she] should be free from institutional censorship or discipline, but [his/her] special position in the community imposes obligations. As a person of learning and an educational officer, [he/she] should remember that the public may judge [his/her] profession and [his/her] institution by [his/her] utterances. Hence [he/she] should at all times be accurate, should exercise appropriate restraint, should show respect for the opinions of others, and should make every effort to indicate that [he/she] is not an institutional spokesperson.

The faculty also endorses the Statement on Academic Rights and Responsibilities published by the American Council on Education (2005).

 

3.52 Centers and Institutes

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College currently does not have Centers or Institutes but will at a later date. Policies will be developed prior to establishing Centers and Institutes.

 

Student Education Abroad Requirements

Student Education Abroad Requirements

Policy Number: 3.53

Effective Date: July 1, 2022

Revision History: August 1, 2018

Policy Contact: Director of Internationalization

Purpose and Policy Statement

This policy defines several types of study abroad, study away, and service-learning opportunities and provides eligibility and credit transfer requirements, as well as requirements for participating in the programs. The policy also stipulates requirements for students receiving financial aid and GGC stipends.

Scope

The policy applies to all students interested in an education abroad program and is implemented primarily by the staffs of the Offices of Internationalization, Financial Aid, Student Accounts. All study abroad and service-learning program directors and their respective deans or supervisors are also responsible for understanding and complying with the policy.

Definitions

Affiliate programs: programs organized by third-party providers with which GGC has affiliation agreements.

Education abroad: an umbrella term for experiential learning programs or activities which occur in a different country and are designed to enhance participants’ academic and intercultural experience. Education abroad at GGC includes study abroad, research abroad, internships abroad, service or civic engagement abroad, and teaching abroad. Activities include, but are not limited to, classroom study, research, and excursions.

Exchange programs: programs which enable GGC students to study for a semester or an academic year at a foreign college or university with which GGC has an exchange agreement. Classes may be taught in the host language, English, or both. Courses taken through GGC exchanges or with GGC exchange partners count as transfer credit.

Good academic standing: A student is in good academic standing if their cumulative Georgia Gwinnett College grade point average is at or above the minimum cumulative Georgia Gwinnett College grade point average for the number of semester hours attempted plus transfer hours as shown in the GGC Catalog.

Good standing: A student is in good standing with the College if they are eligible to enroll in classes and are not on Academic Probation or Conduct Probation.

International internships: opportunities for students to work in an organization abroad to gain practical, real-world experience or satisfy requirements for a course or program of study.

Service learning: a form of study abroad, except that it may or may not be credit bearing. It focuses on contemporary global and transnational issues and emphasizes human connection. Service learning incorporates community work into students’ educational experiences by providing real-world learning experiences that enhance students’ academic learning while providing a tangible benefit to the community in which the activity occurs. GGC service learning may also be carried out in an appropriate setting within the United States.

Study abroad: a credit-bearing program of study in a foreign country. Participants earn grades for the course(s) they take, and the grades may or may not transfer to the participants’ home campus.

Study away: credit-bearing travel based in the U.S. designed to increase the opportunity for students to participate in relevant, hands-on, academic learning in culturally and geographically diverse locations where students can strengthen their intercultural competencies. Participants earn grades for the course(s) they take, and the grades may or may not transfer to the participants’ home campus

USG programs: programs organized by other colleges and universities within the University System of Georgia.

Eligibility and Requirements

The following criteria describe eligibility requirements for all GGC education abroad programs.

1. Only students may participate in GGC education abroad programs. Non-students may not participate in the programs.

2. GGC students who wish to participate in study abroad programs, study away programs, or service-learning programs abroad must be in good academic standing.

3. Students must be in good standing with the College; i.e., they are eligible to enroll in classes and are not on Academic or Conduct Probation or on any form of academic warnings.

4. Certain study abroad programs may require higher GPAs or other prerequisites.

5. To participate in an exchange program with GGC’s overseas partner institutions, students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher by the application deadline. Students interested in participating in exchange programs should contact Internationalization for guidance.

6. GGC students are eligible to participate in study abroad programs or service-learning programs abroad after completing a minimum of 24 collegiate credit hours by the program application deadline. Transfer students must successfully complete a minimum of one full-time semester at GGC before they may study or serve abroad.

7. GGC students are eligible to participate in study away programs if they are in good standing with the College.

8. International students wishing to study abroad must consult International Student Services to verify that their student visa will allow them to study or serve in the proposed host country.

Transfer Credit for Study Abroad

Students must verify whether the program is credit bearing and, if so, how many credits and whether the credits will transfer to their GGC program of study.

Courses from affiliate and non-GGC programs will be reflected on another institution’s transcript and will count as transfer credit at GGC.

The GGC Education Abroad Grant Program (EAG)

The GGC Education Abroad Grant Program (EAG) is funded by a mandatory International Education Fee (IEF). The program has limited funds, and applications will be considered as long as there are funds. Following are guidelines.

Criteria for Grants: All EAG applicants must

1. Have been enrolled the previous semester and be working toward completion of a degree program at GGC

2. Have earned 24 credit hours, including no more than 12 transfer credits

3. Have a minimum institutional GPA of 2.5 (transfer GPA not considered). Please be aware that specific education abroad programs may have a higher GPA requirement than 2.5 to participate

4. Have successfully completed an education abroad program through GGC or any other provider

5. Be traveling to a country or area with an overall Travel Advisory Level 1 or 2 according to the U.S. Department of State Travel Advisory System

6. Not be traveling to locations within these countries or areas that may be designated within the Travel Advisory System as Level 3 (“Reconsider travel”) or Level 4 (“Do not travel”)

7. Follow other applicable GGC education abroad policies and procedures

 

Award Amounts: If approved, students may receive the following amounts:

  • For programs lasting less than 28 days: $500
  • For programs lasting 28-41 days: up to $700
  • For programs lasting 42 days or longer: up to $900 (depending on availability of funds)

Note:

  • Meeting eligibility requirements and applying do not guarantee an award.
  • Maximum number of awards per student during her/his time at GGC: 1

Considerations for determining award amounts for programs lasting four weeks or longer

  • Preference #1: Program sponsor: preference for GGC faculty-led programs
  • Preference #2: Program location: preference for non-traditional locations (those outside the West, Australia, and New Zealand)
  • Preference #3: Duration of program: preference for longer-term programs (semester or yearlong)

Service Requirement

All Education Abroad Grant recipients must complete five (5) hours of community service for the education abroad session for which they request a grant. The service may be completed locally or abroad before applying for the grant. Students will report their service when they apply for the grant. Students can meet the service requirement in one of two ways:

A. If a student enrolls in an education abroad program with an approved built-in international community service project during the overseas trip, the student will not be required to do any additional service prior to receiving the grant. All service will be verified by a grade of “C” or better (for credit-bearing programs) and by successful completion of the service program (for non-credit programs).

B. If a student is not enrolled in an education abroad program with built-in service, the student must complete a five-hour local service project for the requested term within the required time frame of each term. The student may choose any service project she/he likes. For assistance with finding volunteer placement, students should visit Grizzlies Serve Volunteer Opportunities for a list of service opportunities. All service must be tracked through Presence and the applicant must submit to Internationalization a duly signed Volunteer GGC Grizzlies Serve Community Service Form (also available on the Education Abroad Portal).

Other Study Abroad Scholarships & Funding Sources: Students should contact the GGC Education Abroad Portal for external scholarships and funding sources.

SAP Requirements

Federal regulations, HEA Sec. 484(c), §668.16, 668.34 requires all schools participating in Title IV federal financial aid programs to have a Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) policy requiring students to meet the SAP requirements for the term in which they receive the financial support, or the financial support will not be disbursed (see SAP Standards).

Timelines

Service Completion Application Review Notice of Awards
For Fall Programs: March 1 to June 15 prior June 16-30 July 15
For Spring Programs: August 1 to Nov. 15 prior November 16-30 December 15
For All Summer Programs: Nov. 15 to Feb. 31 prior March 1-15 March 30

Additionally, if a student is studying abroad on a GGC Exchange, non-GGC program, ISEP, or Direct Program, the student will need to see an Internationalization adviser for additional paperwork before the Education Abroad Grant award can be posted to the student’s account. The forms include the Education Abroad Course Approval Form and the Transient Request Form, both of which are available on the GGC Education Abroad Portal.

Note: Failure to complete and properly submit the required documents will result in cancellation of any education abroad award!

 

Requirements for Education Abroad Program Directors and International Exchanges

Requirements for Education Abroad Program Directors and International Exchanges

Policy Number: 3.54
Effective Date: April 2021
Revision History: August 1, 2018
Policy Contact: Director of Internationalization

Purpose and Policy Statement

This policy defines several types of study abroad, study away, and service-learning opportunities and provides requirements for academic integrity, faculty compensation, program proposal development and approval, and risk and crisis management. The policy also provides requirements for establishing international exchange agreements.

Scope

The policy applies to education abroad program directors and is implemented primarily by the staff of Internationalization, school deans, the Vice President for Business and Finance, and the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.

Definitions

Affiliate programs: programs organized by third-party providers with which GGC has affiliation agreements.

Contact Hours: When calculating contact hours, field experiences that have academic value and are led by faculty can be incorporated with classroom instruction. One hour of field experience counts as a half-hour of classroom instruction. It is standard practice to reduce the number of classroom contact hours required for credit when the learning is taking place abroad. The usual calculation is to reduce the normal number of contact hours by 20%. If 3 semester credit hours normally require 45 contact hours, then 45 x 80% = 36 (the number of contact hours required for a study abroad program that carries 3 semester credit hours). 

Education abroad: an umbrella term for experiential learning programs which occur in a different country and are designed to enhance participants’ academic and intercultural experience. Education abroad at GGC includes study abroad, research abroad, internships abroad, service or civic engagement abroad, and teaching abroad. Activities include, but are not limited to, classroom study, research, and excursions.

Exchange programs: programs which enable GGC students to study for a semester or an academic year at a foreign college or university with which GGC has an exchange agreement. Classes may be taught in the host language, English, or both. Courses taken through GGC exchanges or with GGC exchange partners count as transfer credit.

Faculty exchange agreement: an international exchange agreement designed to include an exchange of faculty or researchers between institutions for a term exceeding two years.

Faculty-led study abroad programs: programs led and taught by GGC faculty members. The programs grant GGC resident credit, and no course substitution or transient permission is necessary. Students participate in lectures, site visits, excursions, and tours as part of the program.

Good academic standing: A student is in good academic standing if their cumulative Georgia Gwinnett College grade point average is at or above the minimum cumulative Georgia Gwinnett College grade point average for the number of semester hours attempted plus transfer hours as shown in the GGC Catalog.

Good standing: A student is considered to be in good standing with the college if they are eligible to enroll in classes and are not on Academic Probation or Conduct Probation.

International exchange agreement: a written document outlining the terms and conditions providing for an exchange of students, faculty, or staff or specifying research activity between GGC and a university or other institution located outside the territorial boundaries of the United States of America.

International internships: opportunities for students to work in an organization abroad to gain practical, real-world experience or satisfy requirements for a course or program of study.

Memorandum of understanding: an agreement which recognizes a shared interest between parties in exploring together potential projects, funding, or other arrangements that may lead to specific projects. No clear projects or plans are delineated. It is a legally binding contract subject to the same authorization and campus approval procedures as more specific agreements.

Non-provider-organized programs: programs organized and led by the program director, who is responsible for all or most of the logistical arrangements.

Pilot exchange agreement: an international exchange agreement which usually lasts for two years and allows both institutions to review their involvement before making a more substantial time commitment. In many cases, the agreement will be implemented prior to a long-term student or faculty exchange agreement.

Program director: a faculty or staff member responsible for writing the proposal and establishing and leading the program.

Provider-organized programs: programs which rely partly or entirely on third-party providers for logistical arrangements, including program deposit/fee payment, travel (international and in country), accommodations, meals, safety/security, and delivery of the instructional and cultural components.

Service learning: a form of study abroad, except that it may or may not be credit bearing. It focuses on contemporary global and transnational issues and emphasizes human connection. Service learning incorporates community work into students’ educational experiences by providing real-world learning experiences that enhance students’ academic learning while providing a tangible benefit to the community in which the activity occurs. GGC service learning may also be carried out in an appropriate setting within the United States.

Student exchange agreement: an international exchange agreement designed to include an exchange of students between institutions for a term exceeding two years.

Study abroad: a credit-bearing program of study in a foreign country. Participants earn grades for the course(s) they take, and the grades may or may not transfer to the participant’s home campus.

Study away: credit-bearing travel based in the U.S. designed to increase the opportunity for students to participate in relevant, hands-on, academic learning in culturally and geographically diverse locations where students can strengthen their intercultural competencies. Participants earn grades for the course(s) they take, and the grades may or may not transfer to the participants’ home campus

USG programs: programs organized by other colleges and universities within the University System of Georgia.

Student Eligibility and Requirements

The following criteria describe eligibility requirements for all GGC education abroad programs:

1. GGC students who wish to participate in education abroad programs must be in good academic standing with the College; i.e., they are eligible to enroll in classes and are not on Academic or Conduct Probation or on any form of academic warnings.

2. Certain education abroad programs may require higher GPAs or other prerequisites.

3. Students must have achieved the required GGC GPA by the application deadline of the education abroad program.

4. GGC students are eligible to participate in education abroad programs after completing a minimum of 24 collegiate credit hours by the program application deadline. Transfer students must earn at least 12 collegiate credit hours at GGC before they may study or serve abroad.

5. International students wishing to study abroad must consult International Student Services to verify that their student visa will allow them to study or serve in the proposed host country.

Program Proposal Development and Approval

Any type of education abroad program requires a written proposal. Program directors must submit a proposal for each year they plan to lead the program.

The detailed proposal must be approved before the proposer begins making related travel or logistical commitments.

The detailed proposal must address, among others, academics, logistics, risk management, and financial feasibility.

To ensure timely administrative review and budget allocation for the program, a signed copy of the detailed proposal must be submitted to Internationalization according to this schedule:

  • June 30 for programs proposed for the following summer
  • December 1 for programs proposed for the fall, winter, or spring of the following academic year.

NB: No GGC faculty or staff member may lead or serve on more than two programs abroad in a single academic year.

Program directors must keep accurate financial records and follow guidelines on the use of student money as established by the University System of Georgia and GGC.

Academic Integrity for Credit-bearing Programs

The program director must ensure the program is academically substantive and that credit awards are in line with the program curriculum, contact hours, and assignments. Course plans should take advantage of the international setting and ensure academic rigor. Among the factors to consider are these: number of credits, contact hours, class attendance, syllabus, evaluations, and logistics.

Faculty Compensation for Study Abroad: GGC Faculty-Led Programs

The following compensation policy applies to GGC programs, including programs that are in partnership with another USG institution and involve GGC students. Faculty members serving under an academic year contract will be eligible to earn up to 30% of their base salary (or the GGC standard rate per three-credit-hour course) during the summer months for teaching on a summer study abroad program. Faculty members serving under a twelve-month fiscal year contract are ineligible for summer pay. If faculty are teaching a study abroad course during fall or spring semester and the course is part of their normal teaching load, the faculty will not receive extra pay. If the course is considered a course overload during the fall or spring semester, the faculty member will receive instructional overload pay in the spring of the academic year in which the course is taught. The applicable extra compensation amount for overload duties shall be disclosed at time of notification to the employee or as soon as possible. For contract employees, the extra compensation shall be noted on the Academic Year and Fiscal Year Contract Addendum. In addition, limited summer non-teaching assignments may be offered for study abroad programs. If a faculty member’s services are needed beyond the full-time academic year commitment, a separate written agreement will be offered covering information on the study abroad program; said agreement shall govern the service commitment and level of compensation. Faculty members will be compensated according to the following conditions:

  • The GGC standard rate of base pay salary for teaching a three- or four-credit-hour non-laboratory study abroad course during summer
  • Up to five percent of base pay salary for teaching a one-credit hour laboratory study abroad course during summer
  • Compensation for study abroad courses not covered by the above two conditions will be determined by recommendation of the Dean and approval by the Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost (SVPASA/Provost).
  • Compensation for non-teaching summer assignments or special programs will be determined by recommendation of the Dean and approval by the SVPASA/Provost.
  • Extra compensation is not provided for teaching a course during fall or spring as part of teaching load.
  • The instructional overload will be applied in the spring for teaching a course as an overload in fall or spring.

Should the number of students who are accepted and paid in full drop below the requisite headcount of 10 (unduplicated headcount) GGC students per faculty member, then the faculty member must receive approval from his/her dean to continue the program with under 10 students. With approval from the Dean to continue with a program with less than 10 students, the faculty member will be paid based on the pay scale below, or the faculty member may choose not to participate in the program.

Number of Students Compensation (for 3 Credit Hours)
8-9 students 1% less than standard pay
6-7 students 2% less than standard pay
5 students or fewer $300 per student per class

 

 

 

Additional Support:

Based on availability of funding, Internationalization may provide program faculty additional support towards travel costs like airfare, lodging, and up to 50% of the meal per diem as identified by the U.S. Department of State for international travel.

Faculty Compensation for Study Abroad: USG Goes Global Programs

The following compensation policy applies to USG Goes Global programs:

  • Each participating faculty member receives $3,000 per course taught.
  • Each participating faculty member must teach two courses.

(https://www.usg.edu/international_education/usg_goes_global/institution_faqs)

Risk and Crisis Management

Program Directors must organize a program-specific orientation, which should address program-specific issues including, but not limited to, the following: emergencies, medications, immunizations and visas, culture, and academics.

Following are additional safety requirements for each study abroad or service-learning program:

  • The program director must be thoroughly familiar with the program and service providers as well as the cultural, political, and social conditions of the site(s).
  • The program director must make sure that someone is always in charge. An assistant director or in-country coordinator must be available in case the director is incapacitated.
  • If a situation arises where a student may have to remain or is remaining in a foreign country and/or is unable and/or unwilling to return as and when scheduled to do so under the program, the program director and the agent for the college (if such an agent exists) shall individually notify the GGC Office of Internationalization. The notification shall be provided as soon as the program director/agent for the college is aware of any situation where a student may be required to remain or is remaining in a foreign country past the scheduled return under the program. The GGC Overseas Secondary Crisis Management Team shall be activated and notice simultaneously provided to the GGC Senior Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs/Provost.
  • If a student is hospitalized, the program director must take all necessary measures to ensure the student is not alone.
  • All students participating on GGC study abroad or service-learning programs must carry study abroad insurance.
  • The program director must be certified in first aid (CPR) administration.
  • All students who participate in the study abroad program must sign an application form that includes a Waiver of Liability for their program.
  • Under no circumstances may a GGC faculty or staff member purchase for students or provide students with alcoholic beverages.
  • In case of a crisis abroad, the Program Director must contact Internationalization as soon as possible.
  • The program director or any employee with student oversight/authority is obligated to report any disclosures/allegations of Sexual Misconduct, Discrimination, and/or Harassment to Diversity & Equity Compliance.  Reports may be submitted to titleix@ggc.edu, via complaint form at https://www.ggc.edu/community/diversity-equity-compliance/title-ix/file-a-complaint/complaint-form/, or via telephone at 678-407-5085. 

Forms and Templates

Education abroad forms and templates are available on the Education Abroad Portal.

International Exchange Agreements

Before developing an exchange agreement, the developer must consider the potential for exchange and institutional or program compatibility with GGC.

Whenever any unit of GGC enters into an exchange relationship with a university or other institution located outside the territorial boundaries of the United States of America that involves, or might lead to, commitments of college resources of any kind, GGC must sign a written agreement with the partner institution.

Exchange agreements may be negotiated unit to unit, school to school, or in a broad-based institutional capacity. A relationship that stipulates an actual exchange of students, faculty, and/or staff requires a formal exchange agreement.

A relationship that reflects general collaboration without specific exchange components does not require an exchange agreement.

Formal exchange agreements stipulate the details and implementation procedures for a specific program of exchange or collaboration and may in some cases involve a commitment of resources.

The academic population targeted in the exchange agreement determines whether a student exchange agreement or a faculty exchange agreement is appropriate.

Specific exchange agreements that implement an actual exchange must specify the obligations and commitments of each party.

Exchange Agreements 

Every exchange agreement must make clear the following matters: home institution and host institution, parties, requirements for admission to GGC, housing, quotas (if applicable) and balance thereof, duration, visitation status, conduct, work plans, language ability, tuition and other costs, access to institutional resources, limitation of financial commitment, stipends/salary, travel, insurance, and review.

Exchange Agreements may be initiated by a school or Internationalization. School-initiated agreements must be approved at the school level before they go to Internationalization, while Internationalization-initiated agreements are approved directly by Legal Affairs, and then the SVPASA/Provost, with the support of at least one school. All agreements must be approved by the SVPASA/Provost before the President or his/her designee signs them.

Role of Internationalization in Formalizing an Exchange Relationship

Internationalization provides consulting, review, and authorization services for any GGC unit seeking to formalize an exchange relationship with an international counterpart. Internationalization must be included in formalizing any such relationships. Agreement forms and templates are available in Internationalization.

 [JD1]It may be good to specify what constitutes good academic standing.

 [FA2]Based on USG policy…replace language

 [MOU3]Is there a form template that we prefer to use? If so, we should mention that and where it is located.

 

3.55 I-Courses

Reviewed May 26, 2016

I-courses are those courses offered by GGC that have been intentionally designed to promote student learning and development in relation to the College’s 2013-2018 Quality Enhancement Plan. These courses are intended to provide students with opportunities to build intercultural competence and skill. As such, i-courses contain both a high level of international content and the requirements and activities needed to promote student success in achieving the desired learning outcomes at an appropriate level for a given course. The QEP Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) address three broad areas of competence: intercultural awareness (SLOs 1 and 2), communication and collaboration (SLOs 3 and 4), and application (SLO 5).

3.55.1 Operational Definition of An I-Course

Reviewed May 26, 2016

A course is considered an i-course if it:

  1. Has a score of three or four on the Content Rubric, indicating that over 30% of the course material is international or global in focus;
  2. Addresses a minimum of two of the QEP SLOs, drawn from two separate SLO categories as determined by the Outcomes Rubric.
    1. Category 1 is Cultural Awareness and includes SLOs 1 & 2,
    2. Category 2 is Communication and Collaboration and includes SLOs 3 & 4, and
    3. Category 3 is Application/Problem Solving and includes SLO 5.
  3. Expects students to demonstrate competence at a developmentally appropriate level, i.e.:
    1. For lower level courses, a minimum of two SLOs (in 2 of 3 categories) must be met at least at the novice level.
    2. For upper level courses, a minimum of two SLOs (in 2 of 3 categories) must be met at least at the developing level.

3.55.2 Verification of A Course as An I-Course

Reviewed May 26, 2016

A course must be verified as an i-course against the operational definition of an i-course above. A faculty member who develops or revises a course either through the Center For Teaching Excellence (CTE) Internationalized Learning Program (ILP) or individually may submit the course to the QEP Assessment Committee for review and verification. Required information and course materials are to be posted on the QEP Portfolio Course Repository for review. The QEP Assessment Committee will review the course once all materials are submitted and notify the submitting faculty member when a decision is made.

 

3.56 Global Studies Certification

Reviewed May 26, 2016

3.56.1 Global Studies Certification Admission Requirements

Reviewed May 26, 2016

To be accepted into the Global Studies Certification Program, a student must:

  1. Possess a 2.7 Cumulative GPA
  2. Have completed 24 hours of academic credit (with at least 12 hours completed at GGC)
  3. Complete/sign the Certification Agreement available in the Office of Internationalization. (This process involves the student, faculty mentor and Certification Coordinator.)

3.56.2 Global Studies Certification Program Completion Policies

Reviewed December 1, 2016

To complete the Global Studies Certification program, a student must:

  1. Complete at least six (6) hours in i-courses at the 3000 or 4000 level at GGC with a grade of “C” or better. NOTE: Students who took a course in 2012-13 through 2015-16 that is subsequently identified as an i-course may submit a request for the course to fulfill this requirement. The Certification Coordinator will verify whether the course qualifies as an i-course and respond to the student’s request.
  2. Complete the Global Studies Certification Capstone Course with at a grade of “C” or better. NOTE: Capstone Course Registration: Pre-registration for the Certification Capstone Course signals the completion of all other certification requirements.
  3. Complete a credit-bearing study abroad program, or a course offered in an international location, earning a grade of “C” or better and a minimum of 3-credit hours for the experience.
  4. Satisfy the foreign language requirement by demonstrating proficiency in at least one language other than the student’s native language. The foreign language requirement for the Global Studies Certification can be satisfied in any one of the following manners:
  • Two Courses at GGC: Completes two GGC courses at any level (in the same language) in Chinese, French or Spanish with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transfer Courses in Foreign Languages: Transfers into GGC with two courses at any level (in the same foreign language) in any USG recognized modern foreign language with a grade of “C” or better.
  • AP or IB Credit: Completes Advanced Placement (AP) or IB examinations and scores at the recommended score/level, he/she will receive academic credit in those circumstances and subsequently satisfy the Certification’s proficiency requirement.
  • CLEP Testing: Completes CLEP testing for a foreign language and scores at the recommended score/level to receive academic credit.
  • Language Testing International Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) or Writing Proficiency Test (WPT): Completes LTI testing and scores at the recommended level to test out of the GGC language requirement without credit. 

3.56.3 Global Studies Certification Language Proficiency

Reviewed May 26, 2016

The following reference charts provide additional descriptive factors regarding the range of proficiency standards to satisfy the foreign language requirement of the Global Studies Certification:

Language Category Based on Difficulty Class A:Western European Languages (Spanish, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Dutch, etc.) Class B: Other World Languages (Asian languages, Middle Eastern languages, Creole, indigenous languages of Africa and the Americas, Eastern European languages, etc.
Expected Proficiency Levels (See the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines) Intermediate Low (Reading, Writing, or Speaking) Novice Mid (Reading, Writing, or Speaking)
Satisfaction of Requirement With Foreign Language Credit Satisfaction of Requirement With Foreign Language Credit Satisfaction of Requirement With Foreign Language Credit
College Coursework 2 semesters in the same language, completed with a “C” or better1 2 semesters in the same language, completed with a “C” or better1
CLEP Score 50 (Spanish, French, and German)2 N/A
AP Scores 3, 4, or 5 (Spanish, French, ) 3, 4, or 5 (Chinese )
AP Scores 4 or 5 (Italian and German2) 4 or 5 (Japanese)
IB Scores HL 4/SL 5 (Spanish, French, and German) HL 4/SL 5 (Arabic and Chinese)

 

Language Category Based on Difficulty Class A:Western European Languages (Spanish, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Dutch, etc.) Class B: Other World Languages (Asian languages, Middle Eastern languages, Creole, indigenous languages of Africa and the Americas, Eastern European languages, etc.
Satisfaction of Requirement Without College Foreign Language Credit Satisfaction of Requirement Without College Foreign Language Credit Satisfaction of Requirement Without College Foreign Language Credit
Language Testing International Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) or Writing Proficiency Test (WPT) Intermediate Low Novice Mid
  1. Any level, need not be consecutive
  2. Credit in German is currently not awarded through the CLEP, although students are allowed to transfer in credit in German.
 

3.57 Demonstration of English/Reading Competency and Regents’ Writing Competency

Reviewed May 26, 2016

Georgia Gwinnett College has established standards and criteria for demonstrating competency in writing and in reading. Students with transfer credit for English 1101 and/or English 1102 will meet the criteria for demonstrating competency. Students’ records will be updated to show satisfaction of English/Reading Competency and Regent Writing Competency upon receiving transfer credit for English 1101 or 1102 (with a grade of C or better) or completion of English 1101 or 1102 at Georgia Gwinnett College (with a grade of C or better).